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  • It's coronavirus time, which means everyone's locked indoors.

  • Sick and tired of quarantine, you decide to go where you can't possibly infect, or be

  • infected, by the virus- nature!

  • Except maybe all this time indoors has made you forget one crucial fact: nature sucks

  • and really wants to kill you.

  • Don't worry, Infographics is here to remind you of all the reasons man invented apartment

  • buildings and Netflix, with some of the most venomous bites and stings in the world.

  • Warning: some of these entries contain images that may be difficult to stomach.

  • Black Widow Spider

  • Scarlet Johannson notwithstanding, black widow bites are pretty terrible affairs.

  • These spiders can be identified by the red hourglass-like coloring on the abdomen set

  • against a black body, and they inhabit every continent on earth except Antarctica.

  • With venom as much as 15 times as potent as a rattlesnake, these tiny eight-legged horrors

  • can cause anything from moderate discomfort to death, depending on how sensitive the person

  • is to the venom- luckily they discharge far less venom than a rattlesnake per bite, or

  • else they'd surely be exponentially more deadly.

  • So what delights are in store for you after getting a lovebite from everyone's second-favorite

  • Black Widow?

  • Within fifteen minutes you'll start feeling cramps in the area where you were bitten,

  • as your nervous system fires off random signals uncontrollably.

  • Within the first hour, your body will begin to experience powerful muscle spasms as the

  • venom goes all 2007 Britney Spears on your neurotransmitters (animators: show a Britney

  • Spears with shaved head smashing human cells to pieces).

  • Now the pain begins to become acute, and good news for all you wannabe-heart throbs, because

  • your abdomen will become rock-hard as the muscles cramp.

  • The venom isn't trying to give you a sweet beach bod though, instead the alpha-latrotoxin

  • and accompanying cocktail of chemicals is busy trying to kill as many of your nerve

  • endings as possible.

  • Remember, this is a spider that kills by paralyzing its prey.

  • Luckily for most of you, you're too big for the venom to completely shut down your nervous

  • system.

  • Unluckily for you, things are still going to be very, very painful.

  • After about 3 hours your cramps will become acute, leading to extreme pain.

  • You may be looking for painkillers at this point, but because of the effect of narcotics

  • on the body, doctors likely won't prescribe them for fear of helping the venom shut down

  • your breathing.

  • Your skin will get clammy and your blood pressure drop, which will lead to mild delirium and

  • mental confusion.

  • Pregnant women will likely go into labor at this point.

  • As you move into day 2 of your ordeal, and assuming you haven't died yet, symptoms will

  • start to fade, though you can look forward to large amounts of swelling in the affected

  • area for several more days.

  • Black widows may be painful, but they don't even hold a candle to our next entry on this

  • list.

  • Irukandji Jellyfish Jellyfish are simple creatures.

  • They have almost no measurable intelligence, and their entire hunting strategy consists

  • of floating around aimlessly The Irukandji takes everything that's awful

  • about jellyfish and cranks it up to eleven.

  • Jellyfish are notoriously difficult to see and avoid already, and the Irukandji doubled

  • down on that and became even smaller and more difficult to see.

  • The bell is only about 5 to 25 millimeters (.20 inch to .98 inch) wide, but the tentacles

  • can extend up to a meter (3.3 feet) in length.

  • While other jellyfish only have stingers on the tentacles, the Irukandji was kind enough

  • to line even its bell with stingers, you know, so there's absolutely no chance of avoiding

  • getting stung if you run into one.

  • Despite its tiny size, Irukandji jellyfish pack one of the biggest venomous wallops in

  • the world, and is generally accepted as being the most painful sting in mother nature.

  • The initial sting is only mildly painful, and leads most swimmers to believe they ran

  • into a common jellyfish.

  • However, within minutes as the venom circulates through the body, the real nightmare begins.

  • Painful muscle cramps first hit the arms and legs, which can lead to drowning.

  • As the venom makes its way to the organs, the kidneys pulsate with pain akin to that

  • of a kidney stone, while the back begins to spasm.

  • Waves of fiery pain course through the body as nausea, headaches, uncontrolled sweating

  • and vomiting kick in.

  • The heart begins to race uncontrollably, leading to serious problems for those with pre-existing

  • heart conditions.

  • Hospitalization is absolutely necessary for an Irukandji sting, and even the most powerful

  • narcotic painkillers have been widely reported to be completely ineffective.

  • Victims must simply ride out the pain as hospitals try and make them as comfortable as possible.

  • Perhaps the most terrifying part though is the way the venom causes psychological feelings

  • of doom and despair, leading to suicidal thoughts and depression.

  • At least Irukandji jellyfish have the decency of trying to kill you- our next entry will

  • leave holes in your body if it gets its fangs inside you.

  • Brown Recluse Warning, this next entry contains some disturbing

  • images.

  • Spiders are basically the jellyfish of land- they're often extremely venomous, difficult

  • to see, and there's probably one working its way up your pant leg right now but you

  • probably think we're kidding and you're just feeling a random tickle.

  • If it's a brown recluse on your leg though, you'd better start making arrangements to

  • get to the hospital.

  • A bite from a brown recluse is typically painless, though you'll start to feel very tender

  • around the bitten area within a few hours.

  • The area will quickly become inflamed, with burning pain setting in.

  • If you're lucky, this is as bad as it'll get- but most people are not lucky when it

  • comes to brown recluse spiders.

  • For the unlucky victims, necrosis will set in around the affected area, as the venom

  • destroys the surrounding tissues.

  • Typically this begins with a very large blister, then an ulcer will start to develop.

  • Over the course of one or two weeks, the ulcer grows by inches, and dead tissue begins to

  • blacken and scab on the wound.

  • Within three weeks the bite will finally begin to heal, but can take up to 3 months to fully

  • heal.

  • Depending on the location you were bitten, you may need skin grafts or full-on reconstructive

  • surgery to recover from the massive tissue death- and you'll likely carry a significant

  • scar or deformity for the rest of your life.

  • Some victims may even need a limb amputation.

  • Brown recluses only sting defensively, but our next entry doesn't just pack one of

  • the most painful stings in the world, it can fly and chase down its victims.

  • Tarantula Hawk No, it's not a spider that can fly like

  • a hawk- even that's too terrifying for nature to come up with.

  • Instead, the tarantula hawk is a species of wasp that lives to prey on spiders.

  • If you live in the southern United States or South and Central America, you're smack-dab

  • in this species' habitat.

  • Tarantula Hawks like to hunt down spiders and inject them with venom that paralyzes

  • them.

  • The wasp then drags the spider into a hole and plants its egg inside of it.

  • The growing young promptly hatches and feeds on the still-living spider, kind of like a

  • really slow-acting xenomorph.

  • In humans, the venom isn't strong enough to paralyze, but it's more than enough to

  • create one of the most painful experiences of your life.

  • American entomologist Justin Schmidt, who has dedicated his life to the creation of

  • the Schmidt sting pain index, has this to say about the tarantula hawk's sting: all

  • you can do is lay down and scream.

  • The good news is that the pain only lasts for about 5 minutes, the bad news is that

  • this will definitely be the most painful five minutes of your life- other than the last

  • time you tried to do something special in the bedroom for your significant other only

  • to be a complete disappointment.

  • And that is an Infographics sting, with pain that can last from minutes to a lifetime.

  • Our next entry is not only so well camouflaged that many people get stung by accident each

  • year, but the pain of even a glancing sting can last for years.

  • Stonefish

  • Its camouflage is almost perfect, and 13 deadly spines line its body to ward off would-be

  • predators.

  • Unfortunately for humans, those same spines routinely end up piercing the bottom of swimmers

  • feet fairly regularly.

  • For its victims, there's few experiences in life more painful than getting stung by a

  • stonefish.

  • One swimmer stung by a stonefish in Australia managed to accidentally nick one with a finger,

  • and that was more than enough to bring on a nightmare of pain that would last years.

  • Stung on a finger, the pain was immediate and intense, described as having a sledgehammer

  • smash into each knuckle, the wrist, the elbow and then up to the shoulder for an entire

  • hour after the sting.

  • After that, the venom went to work on the kidneys, causing so much pain that the victim

  • couldn't stand or sit straight up, and was forced to remain doubled over in crippling

  • agony.

  • For him, as with most victims, the pain would take years to go away, with recurring kidney

  • pain striking long after the initial sting.

  • And that was just a glancing blow on a single spine.

  • Divers who have stepped onto a stonefish and experienced several of the spines piercing

  • their body have experienced pain so intense they've begged for their limbs to be amputated.

  • Now that's just one more reason to leave the ocean to the jellyfish in our opinion.

  • Now go watch Scientists finally know why mosquitoes bite some people more than others.

  • Or click this video instead!

It's coronavirus time, which means everyone's locked indoors.

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Black Widow Spider Bites - How Painful is it (What Actually Happens to Your Body)?

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    Summer posted on 2021/04/14
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