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  • Do not get in the way of a pregnant lady and  her donuts. That is the moral of this video.  

  • Along the we'll will talk about expectations in  English and how to describe how good something  

  • is. Is it mediocre? out of this worldStick with us, learn useful English phrases,  

  • and English vocabulary and a cute  toddler makes an appearance too.

  • Important: I am not pregnant again. This  is footage from a couple of years ago.  

  • We visit these friends every year. And foryears, we've been trying to get these donuts. We'd

  • heard such good things about them each year. For  whatever reason, it didn't work out to go until  

  • this trip. So at this point, our expectations  were pretty high. An expectation is a belief that  

  • something will happen. Our high expectations meant  we were expecting these donuts to be amazing.

  • We're on our way to try what we've heard  are some of the best donuts in the world.

  • So Tara just said she hope she wasn't talking  about it too much because we have been wanting  

  • to come here for 3 years and sometimes  when you talk something up too much, then  

  • you get let down because you blew it up in your  head into something more than it could ever be.

  • Talking something up: a phrasal verb. When you  talk something up, you talk about how great it  

  • is. “These donuts are the best donuts you'll  ever have. People come from all over the state  

  • for these donuts.” Think about something  you've heard great things about. A movie,  

  • a restaurant, a place to work. Got  it? Now make a sentence with it.

  • I'll do one.

  • The critics really talked up  Parasite, butnever saw it. Now you make a sentence, out loud,  

  • for your example, using 'talk up'. Go ahead and  pause this video if you want to take your time.

  • And before I forget, if you like this  video or you learn something new,  

  • please give it a thumbs up and  subscribe with notifications.  

  • I'd love to have you as my student here on  YouTube. Now, let's hear just that phrase again.

  • So Tara just said she hope she  wasn't talking 'em up too much.

  • Talking'em up. What's 'em? This is one of  common ways we pronounce the word 'them'.  

  • In this case, 'them' refers to 'the donuts.' And  what we do is drop the TH sound, we also change  

  • the vowel EH, THEM, to the em, em, em the schwaAnd we say it really quickly. Em,em, em. We link  

  • it on to the end of the word that comes before  it. Talking'em, talking'em, talking them up.

  • So Tara just said she hope she  wasn't talking 'em up too much.

  • Now, I also saidlet down.”

  • Sometimes when you talk something  up too much, then you get let down  

  • because you blew it up in your head into  something more than it could ever be.

  • You get let down. Disappointed. Like  the Beatles songDon't let me down”.

  • You get let down because you blew it up in your  heard into something more than it could ever be.

  • Because you blew it up in your head. Blow  up, a phrasal verb, it has a lot of different  

  • meanings. The way I used it here, it means  to make something bigger, better in my mind.  

  • You think about something so much, so  positively, that you kind of blow it  

  • up into something bigger or better than it can  actually be in reality. It also means to explode.  

  • They're going to blow up the old building to make  space for new houses. It also means to get really  

  • angry. My boss blew up at me for being late  again. It also means to enlarge, like a photo.  

  • We're going to blow up a family  photo to hang in our dining room.

  • You get let down because you blew it up in your  head into something more than it could ever be.

  • As we said, talking something up is to speak  very favorably of it. What's the opposite? To  

  • belittle something, to disparage it. In other  words, to say it's not very good. Talk down.

  • So David said we're going to talk'em down. How to  we talk'em down? These donuts are kind of stale.

  • Well they're just, they're average.

  • Notice that 'them' reduction. Talk'em  down, talk'em, talk'em. Talk down does  

  • have another definition. It's when you think  someone can't understand what you're saying,  

  • so you really simplify it. It's a little  insulting. If you're arguing with somebody and you  

  • feel they're doing this to you, you can say, don't  talk down to me. But here we're talking about  

  • trying to lower our expectations. They're really  high, and we don't want to be disappointed.

  • High expectations, low expectations, no  expectations. If you have no expectations,  

  • that means you have no idea what to expectyou've heard nothing about it. If something's  

  • been really talked up, of course, you'll  have high expectations. If it's been talked  

  • down a little, you might have low expectationsYour expectations might also be based on previous  

  • experience. For example, if you went to Disney  world last year and had the time of your life,  

  • and now you're going back, you  probably have pretty high expectations.

  • So we decided, to lower our expectations,  

  • we're going to come up with a bunch of ways  to say the donuts just aren't that good.

  • So David said we're going to talk'em down. How to  we talk'em down? These donuts are kind of stale.

  • Stale. You do not want that in a pastry.  

  • It's a few days old. Eww. You want  the opposite. Fresh. What else?

  • We'll they're just, they're average.

  • Average. Not terrible, but not very good. If  you're selling something, this is not what  

  • you want people to say about it. You want  them to give it a glowing reviewthat is,  

  • to say how much they loved it. You want them to  say it's out of this world. Out-of-this-world,  

  • out-of-this pronouncedoutta”, means excellentthe best of the best. Way better than average.

  • We'll they're just, they're average.

  • Stoney: Yeah. They just (mumbling)

  • They're just average.

  • Stoney, can you talk them down a little bit?

  • Say I bet these donuts aren't that great.

  • Not that great. Again, that's sort of like  average. What else? How else can you describe  

  • something as being not very good? Let's hear  what Stoney has to say about the donuts.

  • Yummy,yummy!

  • Oh, you think they're going to  be yummy? Stoney's talkin'em up.

  • Talkin'em'up! He didn't want to talk them  down. He was too excited to have donuts.  

  • But David and I had lots of other phrases  to say something is just not very good.  

  • Stoney, as you'll notice, was really  into repeating what we were saying.

  • David, you said they we're kind of average  and then you had another phrase for that.  

  • What did you say? Yeah, I've heard these  donuts we're just run of the mill. Yeah.

  • Yeah. They're just. They're just run  of the mill. They're nothing special.

  • Nothing special.

  • Run of the mill, nothing special. The idiom run  of the mill means exactly what we're talking about  

  • here. Average. Not especially good, not especially  bad. Just ordinary. Notice the stress there,  

  • just like when we reduced 'them' in  “talking 'em up”. RUN uhthe MILL. 'Of'  

  • and 'the' are unstressed, said very quicklyThey SHOULD NOT have the same stress as  

  • 'run' and 'mill'. I even reduced 'of' by dropping  the V. uhthe, uhthe. Run of the. Run of the mill.

  • We also said they were nothin' special.  

  • Changing the ING ending, nothing, to the  IN ending, nothin'. This is something we  

  • do sometimes in familiar phrases like this. It  makes it a little more casual. Nothin' special.

  • Yeah, I've heard these donuts  we're just run of the mill.

  • Yeah. They're just run of  the mill. They're nothing special.

  • Nothing special.

  • What else?

  • Mediocre.

  • Stoney: Mediocre.

  • (Laughing) Stoney thinks so too.

  • I bet he won't think so when he eats them.

  • Eats'em. Again, reducing 'them' to 'em'.  

  • We also said 'mediocre'. Just not very good. You  never want to hear your boss saying about you,  

  • His performance is pretty mediocre.” Let's hear  three more ways to say something is not good.

  • These donuts leave a lot to be desired.

  • Yeah. They're falling short of expectationsAnybody else got one? They suck.

  • Stoney: Yes!

  • The final one there, “they suckis very informalmaybe a little bit crass, not a cuss word but sort  

  • of. It's used a lot in the US, but you probably  don't want to use it in a professional setting.  

  • Casually, you can use it to describe something  that's not good at all, likethese donuts  

  • suck,” “the weather sucks”, “that movie  sucked.” You can also use it for situations.  

  • Let's say you run out of gas and you're  stranded on the side of the road. You might say,  

  • Well this sucks.” You can also use it  for sympathy. If a friend is disappointed,  

  • for example, “my computer crashed and I lostbunch of workyou could say, “Aw, that sucks.”  

  • But you would not want to use this for sympathy  in a more extreme situation, likeMy dog died.”  

  • Do not follow that withThat sucks.” Let's listen  to these three again. We all laugh because of how  

  • informal 'sucks' is, and to be honest, that's  probably not a word we want Stoney using yet.

  • These donuts leave a lot to be desiredYeah. They're falling short of expectations.  

  • Anybody else got one? They suck.

  • Stoney: Yes!

  • We have one more.

  • These donuts have nothing to write home about.

  • Another idiom, that again means, just nothing  special. Not particularly good. You wouldn't  

  • write home to family. Back in the days of writing  letters, to tell them how good the donuts are.

  • Ordinary run of the mill  donuts, we hope that's not true.

  • Ok, so, we've used a lot of phrases to describe  

  • the donuts NOT being good. We've tried to lower  our expectations. Let's go try these donuts.

  • Rise' n Roll. They took the and reduction and they  wrote it. They've made just and n. Rise' n Roll.

  • It's overrated?

  • Overrated

  • Yeah We're trying to lower your expectations.

  • Yeah, thank you!

  • They're still trying to lower our expectations.  

  • Saying something is overrated means you don't  think it's as good as other people say it is.

  • Is it good? Is it meeting your expectations?

  • Stoney ate a free sample. Let's  go ahead and put in our order.

  • He'll have one of the Cinnamon caramel  and I'll have one too. So two of those.

  • Three of those.

  • Three of those.

  • A glazed.

  • I'll have a glazed. You want a glazed too?  

  • Well, let's split the glazed and then  let's just split the chocolate covered.

  • Lucas and Tara should come  with us. We got a dozen.

  • One glazed, one chocolate covered.

  • We finished putting in our order and  pay. Now, let's try these donuts!

  • Here Stoney, put on your smock.

  • A smock is something kids wear to keep clean while  doing messy art projects, or in this case, eating.  

  • We also have lots of bibs, which just go around  the neck. With a smock you put your arms through.

  • So you love it. Do you think it's as good as  the Krispy Kreme fresh off the conveyor belt?

  • As you know I never have that.

  • You haven't?

  • Right.

  • A Krispy Kreme fresh off the conveyor beltRemember fresh, the opposite of stale,  

  • which we talked about earlier in this video. I  grew up in Gainesville, Florida, where there is  

  • a Krispy Kreme donut shop. And when you drive  by, if they're finishing up a batch of donuts,  

  • they turn on this neon sign  to let you know they're hot,  

  • super-fresh, just made. And, when they're  that fresh, they're truly the best.

  • A conveyor belt is something you'll see infactory, moving things from one place to another,  

  • so if it's coming off the conveyor  belt, it's done, it's hot,  

  • it's perfect. And David has never had one.

  • I didn't know that I forgot.

  • But yeah, there's no chance. I mean nothing  could be better than this. So that's not bad.

  • I'm just saying get a glazed off the  conveyor belt. It's better than that glazed.

  • So there it is, my opinionThese donuts were good,  

  • but they were not the best donuts I've ever  had. However, I did say this about them.

  • Definitely worth the drive.

  • What did you say?

  • Definitely worth the drive.

  • Oh good. Okay.

  • Worth the drive. Worth it. We use this phrase  when we're talking about something that was  

  • expensive, or took effort. Even with  that expense, we're glad we did it.  

  • It was 'worth it'. “It's a long hike to the top  of the mountain, but the views are so great,  

  • it's worth it.” The necklace was very expensive  but my mom likes it so much, it was worth it. In  

  • this case, we had to drive about 30 minutes to  get there, but it was good, so it was worth it.

  • I try to make great videos for you so that each  minute you spend with me feels worth it. I make  

  • new videos here on YouTube every Tuesday and  I love being your English teacher. Keep your  

  • learning going right now with this video, and  don't forget to subscribe with notifications.  

  • I'll see you back here next week. That's itand thanks so much for using Rachel's English.

Do not get in the way of a pregnant lady and  her donuts. That is the moral of this video.  

Subtitles and vocabulary

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B1 stoney mill glazed conveyor conveyor belt average

English Phrases | LOWERING EXPECTATIONS

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    Summer posted on 2021/04/13
Video vocabulary