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  • Hi, welcome to England dot com.

  • I'm adam in today's lesson.

  • It's a little bit of a special treat for you guys.

  • It's fraser verbs, I know you guys love the fraser verbs but a little bit different.

  • What's different about these fraser verbs as is that they don't actually use a verb, they use a noun with a preposition and together these work to create a verb.

  • Even more special is the fact that all of them include an animal.

  • So I take an animal at a preposition and you get a completely different verb than you could even imagine.

  • Some of them you can guess because of the animals in nature, but most of them you're going to need to be told about.

  • So we're gonna look at pig out, wolf down, fish for horse around, Monkey with ferret out fair, It is an interesting animal.

  • Chicken out!

  • Clam up, weasel out.

  • Usually weasel out of something squirrel away.

  • This is a tricky word, squirrel, Bear with duck out and rat on.

  • Okay, so these are the animals were looking at and I'll explain to you each one, so pig out and wolf down.

  • They're kind of similar, they both have to do with eating.

  • If you pig out, it means you're eating a lot because the idea is that pigs eat a lot, they're always eating, always eating.

  • So if you pig out, you're eating a lot, If you wolf something down means you're eating it very fast.

  • So some people wolf down their food that they're pigging out on, they can do both things at the same time.

  • So for example, if you're, if you go to an all you can eat buffet, you go to a restaurant, you pay one price and there's all kinds of tables full of food and you can eat as much as you want.

  • So a lot of people go to these buffets and they just pig out on all the food if you're really, really, really hungry and you go to a restaurant or you go home and you make yourself a meal and then you just wolf it down.

  • You like eat it right away.

  • It's gone in seconds.

  • Okay, So that's what these two phase als mean fish for.

  • This is a little bit tricky if you're thinking about fish and you think about fishermen, they, they have a rod in the line and they throw the hook and the bait into the water and they're fishing for something.

  • They want to try to catch some fish.

  • So when a person fishes for something, they're trying to catch some information or some detail or some gossip.

  • So if your friend is asking you a lot of different questions, it sounds, it seems to you like they're trying to get something specific, then they are fishing for details.

  • They are fishing for gossip, they're trying to catch something from you.

  • So be careful with them.

  • If you're horsing around this was a little bit hard to guess.

  • A horse just runs around and playfully.

  • If you're horsing around, you're just playing with someone or something, right?

  • So if you're just like, if you go to your friend and you like, you know, push them, but for fun, not for not angry or anything, just push him or you do some little trick or have some fun with somebody, you're just horsing around, you're not serious, you just playful, having a good time.

  • Okay, that's horse around monkey with.

  • Now, a lot of people, especially men, they like to get into their car engine for example, or into their home stereo and they go inside and they bring their tools and they, you know, they're trying to fix something, they're trying to change something because they think they really know the engine, they really know mechanics, what they're really doing is monkeying around the monkey with the engine because at the end of the day they don't actually know what they're doing.

  • They're probably going to make some mistakes.

  • Like a monkey fixing the engine is the same as a person who doesn't know engines fixing the engine.

  • So if you're monkeying around, you're doing little changes in little fixes, but you don't really know what you're doing, ferret out now, first of all, what is a fair, it is a little bit hard to explain.

  • I recommend that you get on your, get on the internet and do a google search or whatever search you use and look at a picture of a ferret, it looks a little bit like a rat, but it's longer and it has for and you know, it like walks around all over the place and does all kinds of little things.

  • If you ferret out now, if you, if you've ever seen a ferret in action like a real ferret, they go into every little corner, looking for stuff, looking for food, looking for something.

  • So if you fair, it's something out means you discover, you ferret out the information, you ferret out the secret to ferret out something.

  • You discover something like a little ferret that goes everywhere.

  • Okay, They're kind of cute but not that much fun chicken out.

  • Now, a lot of people probably heard of the word chicken to mean like coward or somebody who's afraid of something.

  • So if you chicken out of uh a situation or uh, if you go, you want to do something or you promised to do something and then you chicken out, it means that you decided not to do it because you were too afraid.

  • Okay, maybe a little bit cowardly.

  • So a lot of people, they say, yeah, this year I'm going to go on the big roller coaster and then they go to the amusement park and they get to the roller coaster and they look up and they see the big drop and they say maybe next year I'll do it.

  • So they chickened out.

  • They didn't go on it because they were too afraid.

  • Okay.

  • Clam up a clam, like seafood.

  • It's like this shell and it opens and closes and there's some like a clam inside.

  • So if you clam up then you basically, you don't speak, you, your lips close like a clam and no sound comes out now.

  • Two things.

  • Two ways to use this expression if you tell someone to clam up, which is a little bit old fashioned, you don't hear people saying that anymore, but you used to hear some teachers that clam up means shut up means close your mouth, stop talking, but if a person clams up, it means maybe they got really nervous and they just, they couldn't speak, So if again in school, if your teacher calls on you to answer a question and you clam up means you get really tight and quiet and don't say anything, you're too nervous.

  • If you got a job interview, the interviewer asked you questions and you clam up.

  • Not a very good sign that you'll be a good worker, so make sure you speak well.

  • Okay, now weasel out of a weasel is very similar to a fair it again, you can do a search for that, what a weasel looks like.

  • A weasel is a little bit bigger than a ferret.

  • Now, a weasel can basically get into every little space.

  • It's a, it's a wild animal, you want like a ferret.

  • Some people have, it's pets weasels, you can't have as a pet, it's a wild animal, but it knows how to get into places and it knows how to get the food and it knows how to get away from a predator, another animal that's trying to catch it.

  • So when we say weasel out of it means we can find like a little bit of a sneaky way or we can find our way out of a difficult situation.

  • So the boss in your company, the boss wants somebody to work on the weekend and you say, oh, you know my mother is sick, I gotta go take care of her.

  • So you weaseled out of the situation and somebody else had to come in and work because you didn't want to do it.

  • So you weaseled out of having to work on the weekend, okay.

  • You found a sneaky way to get out squirrel away.

  • Squirrels also look a little bit like rats, but they have a big tail, very furry.

  • They climb up trees and they eat nuts in Canada.

  • We have a lot of them, they're kind of cute but stay away from them.

  • Don't go near them.

  • They bite.

  • So if you squirrel something away, so squirrels, if you ever ever see how they collect food, they'll take a nut, they'll put it in, one cheek goes up like this and they'll take another night, put in another chick, then another nut and then they go up to the tree and they hide the nuts for the winter.

  • So if you squirrel something away, it means that you're saving it.

  • So some people squirrel away a few dollars every month for vacation or for retirement or whatever.

  • So basically we squirrel away save a little bit.

  • Okay, bear with.

  • So a bear everybody knows a bear.

  • If you bear with something it means you endure it or you tolerate it.

  • So if you have pain, you have to bear with the pain until the doctor can come and fix it.

  • For example, sometimes you can just say just bear the pain, but if you bear with, you can bear with the doctor fixing stuff, you can bear with a situation you can tolerate or endure.

  • Usually a difficult situation.

  • Now a duck.

  • Now if you ever hear anybody yelling duck automatically go like this because something is coming at your head.

  • So to duck means to go like this.

  • It's also of course the animal like donald duck, but if you duck out of uh of a place means you you leave without anybody noticing.

  • So if you duck out of the party or you duck out of the ceremony, it means you went like this and nobody can see you when you left and went your way and it's all good.

  • And last one rat on a rat is like a big mouse, grey long tail lives in like dirty places.

  • If your rat on someone, it means you you tell about them, they have a secret or they did something bad and you tell the police or this guy did it or that person did it.

  • Or if the teacher, the teacher is writing something on the board and in the back he or she here is some giggling and he turns around, the teacher turns around and says who did that?

  • And then one boy or one student says oh he did it.

  • So that first boy rats on the other boy and gets the other boy in trouble.

  • Okay, It's not good to rat on people.

  • If you can avoid it, avoid it, but sometimes it happens.

  • Okay, so there you go, you have a whole bunch of new faisel verbs.

  • Remember all the animals are not actually verbs, but when you combine them with these prepositions, they become verbs with very specific meanings and these are very, very common.

  • You will hear these native speakers use these all the time, so get familiar with them and make sure you know how to use them.

  • Okay now if you want to make sure if you want to practice your understanding of these, go to invade dot com.

  • There's a quiz below the video, you can test your knowledge of these faisel verbs.

  • You can also ask questions.

  • If you're not sure about any of these, I'll be happy to answer them and that's it.

  • If you like the video, give me a like, don't forget to subscribe to my channel and come back for more useful vocabulary and grammar and writing tips and all kinds of other stuff.

  • Okay, see you again soon.

  • Bye bye.

Hi, welcome to England dot com.

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B1 clam weasel bear squirrel duck rat

13 Phrasal Verbs with Animals: fish for, clam up, wolf down...

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    林宜悉 posted on 2021/04/09
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