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  • Is 'gonna' bad English? Is it wrongIs it improper? Yes and no. And also,  

  • you have options. You certainly don't want to be  saying 'going to' all the time. Let's explore

  • Personally, i don't like a 'gonna' in writing  at all. I wouldn't use it in a text or an email  

  • to a friend, but that's personal preferenceSome people think it's not a problem. However,  

  • it would be absolutely inappropriate to  use it in something like a cover letter.  

  • So don't use it in professional writingAnd if you're not sure, just don't use it

  • Spoken English, however, is an entirely different  thing. Reductions like 'gonna' are a natural part  

  • of spoken English, and have a place there. Whether  it's a conversation with a friend, or in an  

  • important professional environment. Professional  English is not English where each word is  

  • clearly and fully pronounced. This is not natural  English in any setting. This example: And you're  

  • so determined to get there, that you're just  gonna crash through any obstacle. Can you do that

  • A business person in a professional settinggiving a speech, use not only gonna but also  

  • wanna. We'll get into that more and other good  pronunciations and reductions for 'going to'  

  • in a minute. But first, you need to know some  grammar about when you can and can't use 'gonna'. 

  • It has to be followed by a verb. If you're gonna  use gonna. Did you hear that? Gonna use. The next  

  • word, use, a verb, it's okay to pronounce 'going  to' as gonna. But you can't use it in these cases.  

  • The word after 'going to' is not a verbGoing to my friend's house. My, not a verb,  

  • can't reduce to gonna. Going to the grocery  store. The, not a verb, can't say gonna.  

  • So we can't say: i'm gonna my friend's houseOr: i'm gonna the grocery store. Instead, say:  

  • i'm going to my friend's house. Or: i'm going to  the grocery store. But let's change the sentences.  

  • I'm going to drive to my friend's house.  I'm going to go to the grocery store. Now,  

  • what comes after 'going to'? Drive and go. Both  verbs. So 'going to' in both of these sentences  

  • can be pronounced gonna. I'm gonna drive to my  friend's house. I'm gonna go to the grocery store

  • Every once in a while I'll get a comment from  someone or an email when I'm teaching reductions  

  • that's like this: this is horrible EnglishHow dare you call yourself an English teacher?  

  • But show me one example where reductions  aren't present in American English.  

  • I've never found one in fact, once I got  an email from someone complaining about  

  • Obama using 'gonna' and the ''to' reduction. I  pointed out that these reductions are an important  

  • part of spoken English, and that Trump, who is  present at the time, uses reductions as well.  

  • Anyone, everyone, rightly so, uses reductionsBut she never emailed me back. You know,  

  • most native speakers just have no idea  about their own pronunciation habits.  

  • You know what? Let's hear a 'toreduction from Trump. He's gonna say  

  • 'to protect our families'. To, to, to protect. Brave law enforcement officers who risk their  

  • lives every day to protect  our families in our country

  • To protect. Okay, but would he use  gonna? Yes! He uses it twice here

  • Other people aren't gonna bring it backcertainly the person that we're dealing  

  • with is not gonna bring it back. So love reductions. Embrace them,  

  • presidents use them. Gonna is extremely commonNow, we just mentioned the 'to' reduction.  

  • You can use a 'to' reduction in the phrase 'going  to' instead of gonna. You can say: going to,  

  • going to, to, to, to. We almost never pronounce  that 'going to'. Going to-- I'm going to be a  

  • little bit late. So 'to' reduction, T, schwa, tt--  In a minute, we'll hear more examples of that

  • Another common reduction is instead of  saying 'gonna' or 'going to' is to say:  

  • going to- A flap T. Going to-- dadadadada going to

  • I'm going to be a little bit late. So we can  say: gonna, going to, or going to- All of  

  • these are good reductions for any situationand will sound more natural than 'going to'.  

  • You know, if you're a non-native speakerand you didn't learn these reductions,  

  • and they're not that comfortable for you, I  get that. I'll include a training session at  

  • the end of this video so you can get more used to  making these sounds, so they become more natural  

  • and comfortable for you. But now, let's listen  to some real world examples. I went to Youglish,  

  • and for American English, I typed in 'going to'. Now the kinds of videos that usually show up on  

  • Youglish tend to be talks. Ted talkspresentations, that kind of thing.  

  • So perhaps a little bit more professional than  conversational English. But still, even in these  

  • professional settings, gonna is dominant.  I listened to a hundred examples of 'going  

  • to'. The reduction 'gonna' happened 58 timesThe other examples had a different reduction.  

  • The full pronunciation of 'going to' didn't  happen. Let's listen to a few examples of 'gonna'. 

  • Gonna. Gonna. Gonna. Gonna. So much gonna. Get  really comfortable with this pronunciation. As I  

  • said, i'll give you some pointers and help you  train in the second part of this video. Now,  

  • we'll listen to some examples where the word  'to' is pronounced 'tuh'. True T, schwa,  

  • going tuh-- going tuh-- This  happened 24 out of 100 times

  • And finally, the reduction where 'tois pronounced 'tuh', with a flap T,  

  • going tuh-- going tuh-- going tuh--  This one occurred 18 times out of 100. 

  • If you're wondering what's the difference between  these reductions, when you should use one,  

  • when you should use another, don't worry about  it, they're interchangeable, it doesn't matter.  

  • It's probably easiest to learn  gonna and stick with that one.  

  • So to answer the question, is 'gonnawrong? If you don't already know, is no,  

  • absolutely not. It's very right in spoken  English. Now, let's get into some training.  

  • G consonant, UH vowel, very relaxed, guh guh  guh, low placement, guh, not gah, gah, gah,  

  • not high placement, guh, guh, guh, gonna,  

  • gonna. The tongue flaps quickly on the roof  of the mouth for the N. Gonnnanananananana--  

  • Gonna. Gonna. And a schwa at the endThat second syllable should be as short,  

  • as fast as you can make it. It's not uhit's uh, uh. No longer than that. Gonna.  

  • Gonna. First syllable, a bit longer, second  syllable just as short as you can make it.  

  • Gonna. Gonna. I say it, then you repeat it back  out loud. Training is pointless if you're not  

  • gonna do it out loud. Train it with me focus on  the rhythm and making that second syllable as  

  • short as you can. Focus on the placement, nice and  low. Guh guh guh gonna. Repeat after me ten times.  

  • Make your whole face relaxed.

  • Gonna.

  • Good.

  • Now, we'll get into some sentences. We'll train  ten sentences. You'll hear just 'gonna' then  

  • some fragments, then the whole sentence. Each time  you see the word repeat, say what you just heard.  

  • You'll listen and repeat to each part three timesBe careful that you're not over pronouncing.  

  • There might also be other words in the sentence  that reduce or are unstressed, say them quickly,  

  • just like the last syllable of gonna. You're  going to have to simplify your mouth movements  

  • to match the speed of what you hear. Rely on  your ear, maybe even you want to close your eyes.  

  • Maybe you don't even want to see the text  on the screen. Just rely on your ear and  

  • repeat what you hear. You can do this. In this audio file, you'll hear sentences  

  • with the reduction of gonna. You'll  hear each sentence fragment three  

  • times. Repeat each time.

  • You know, if you're interested  in reductions and training,  

  • I have a course dedicated to reductions in my  academy, and each example has tons of audio  

  • to train with. Visit rachelsenglishacademy.com  check it out, sign up, you're going to love it

  • You're going to love the transformation that  takes place when you have the right materials  

  • to train with. And be sure to come back every  Tuesday for new videos on the English language.  

  • Keep your learning going right now with this  video, and please do subscribe with notifications.  

  • I love being your English teacher. That's it  and thanks so much for using Rachel's English.

Is 'gonna' bad English? Is it wrongIs it improper? Yes and no. And also,  

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B1 gonna gonna reduction tuh syllable grocery store repeat

When To Use Correctly "GONNA" | How To Speak English

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    Summer posted on 2021/04/06
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