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  • I was so embarrassed.

  • One time, hanging out with friends, I completely mispronounced a word.

  • The stress was wrong, the sounds were wrong, it wasn't even close.

  • And it was a grammar word, and I teach English!

  • We all make mistakes, especially when it comes to pronouncing words, even native speakers

  • of English.

  • Even adults.

  • So this video is for you, my students, non-native speakers of English who are sometimes embarrassed

  • when they mispronounce a word.

  • You are not alone.

  • Today, we're going over 9 words that Americans have mispronounced.

  • You'll learn about pronunciation, you'll learn some new vocabulary words, and if you're a

  • native speaker and you have a story of mispronouncing a word, or hearing one mispronounced, please

  • put it in the comments below.

  • I love collecting your stories.

  • As always, if you liked this video or if you learned something new, please give it a thumbs

  • up and subscribe with notifications on.

  • I'd love to see you back here.

  • The word I mispronounced was this one.

  • Guess how it's pronounced.

  • It's a noun, and it means a verb being used as a noun.

  • It's used to express something generalized.

  • Learn, learning, for example.

  • I'm learning to drive.

  • There, it's a verb.

  • But I could say: The best learning happens in the real world.

  • The best learning.

  • There, I'm using learning as a noun.

  • This word is pronounced 'gerund'.

  • And when I was hanging out with some friends one weekend, I said: gerund.

  • Wrong consonants, wrong vowels, wrong stress.

  • I got everything wrong.

  • So the camera wasn't rolling when I said it but it was rolling when my friend brought

  • it up again later to make fun of me.

  • She has pie in her mouth so it's a little hard to hear but she says 'gerund'.

  • And I say, I was waiting for that to come up.

  • Gerund.

  • I was waiting.

  • I was waiting for that to come up.

  • So don't be like me.

  • It's gerund.

  • Gerund.

  • We're just going to have everyone text each other randomly the word 'gerund'.

  • Gerund.

  • I had never heard this word spoken before, I'd only ever seen it written.

  • I came to the conclusion, my pronunciation, my wrong pronunciation was influenced by my

  • study of German.

  • And since I studied German in a classroom as an adult, it's possible I heard this word

  • pronounced in German.

  • Listen to it.

  • The first two syllables Americanized it the pronunciation I chose.

  • Gerund.

  • I was waiting.

  • I was waiting for that to come up. I am not taking the time to explain that. That is getting edited out.

  • Gerund.

  • We're just going to have everyone text each other randomly the word 'gerund'.

  • I will never live that down.

  • The phrase to live something down is almost always used in the negative.

  • I will never live that down.

  • You won't live that down.

  • And it means live long enough to wipe out memories or effects of something.

  • I will never live that down.

  • My friends will always remember that about me, and probably, they'll always make fun

  • of me for that.

  • Let's get into a few mispronunciations that you all suggested in comments to other videos.

  • One of you suggested 'chic'.

  • SH consonant, EE vowel, K. A word of French origin, Dictionary.com gives just one pronunciation

  • of it, chic.

  • I've also heard this word mispronounced.

  • This chic 11,000 square foot house has 5 bedrooms and 9 bathrooms.

  • This word is chic.

  • Not to be confused with cheek.

  • Or chick, a baby chicken.

  • Chic.

  • Very fashionable, stylish.

  • Do you know anyone who is specially chic?

  • Here are a few examples of the correct pronunciation.

  • Men who I think are chic and inspiring.

  • While women paraded down the boulevard wearing these chic new gowns.

  • Make it a little more chic.

  • The glasses are basically a chic round frame.

  • Have you ever noticed with ES words like espresso, especially, escape, these words are sometimes

  • pronounced as if the S were an X. KS instead of sss-- S. That's not the pronunciation.

  • The drink is espresso.

  • There is no K sound in it.

  • Espresso, not expresso.

  • That's mixing up two words.

  • Espresso and express.

  • So you don't want to say:

  • Try Espresso.

  • You know, I just want to emphasize, again, I like to show clips of people mispronouncing

  • words to normalize it.

  • These are not dumb people.

  • English is just hard.

  • So for all my students studying English as a foreign language, even we as native speakers,

  • we get you.

  • It's tough.

  • Let's hear some examples of correct pronunciation of espresso.

  • Especially.

  • Not expecially. Not...

  • This word means particularly. I love roses especially red ones.

  • And one more like this, escape.

  • This one's confusing.

  • There is a K sound, but it comes after the S, not before.

  • Escape.

  • Escape.

  • To get away, to avoid capture.

  • Not excape.

  • Escape.

  • So, not:

  • But instead:

  • Okay, this next one, Big Mac, thank you for your suggestion.

  • People are all over the place with this one.

  • And some were dictionaries.

  • Dictionary.com and the Cambridge Dictionary gave one pronunciation, but it's not the same

  • pronunciation.

  • Dictionary.com says its: eschew.

  • Cambridge says its: eschew.

  • So different vowels in the first syllable.

  • This word, by the way, means to intentionally avoid something, to give something up.

  • I'm eschewing dessert this month to lose weight.

  • For example.

  • Oxford varies a bit.

  • They give us eschew, yet another different vowel in the first syllable, they also say:

  • eschew is the correct pronunciation.

  • And Merriam Webster gives us: eschew and eschew.

  • Two more acceptable pronunciations.

  • That gives us a total of 6 pronunciations listed in dictionaries and there's a little

  • overlap from dictionary to dictionary.

  • That's rare.

  • I don't think I've ever come across another word where there is such little agreement

  • among major dictionaries on pronunciation.

  • With this in mind, I guess, maybe there's no wrong pronunciation.

  • I think you could reasonably defend any of these 6 options.

  • So, what's most common?

  • I went to one of my favorite research sites, Youglish, and I found this pronunciation breakdown.

  • Eschew is definitely the most common pronunciation in American English.

  • Even though some of the major dictionaries don't even list it as a pronunciation.

  • This is a pretty sophisticated word so I'm guessing it might be new to a lot of my students.

  • Remember, the definition is to avoid something.

  • To give something up.

  • We're going to listen to 10 examples now.

  • Real life examples so you can see different situations and sentences to build your understanding

  • of how to use this word.

  • You'll hear a couple different pronunciations.

  • And now, we're going to have to move on with one that has more to do with writing.

  • Do you know these two words?

  • Americans sometimes mix them up in writing and it's easy to see why.

  • One of them is loose, and the other one is lose.

  • One is spelled with one O and the other, two, but the difference in pronunciation isn't

  • the vowel, it's the ending consonant.

  • One is an S, loose, the other is a Z, lose.

  • The one with one O, the verb, has the Z pronunciation.

  • When the final sound is voiced, like here, zzz, that's a voiced sound, the Z.

  • It tends to make the vowel longer.

  • So think of the OO vowel being longer here that in lose, which is the opposite of what

  • you might think because it's written with just one letter O and the other, with two.

  • But the vowel here is longer.

  • Lose.

  • With the weak ending Z.

  • This is a verb and it means to come to be without something.

  • To fail to retain something.

  • sample sentences: I might lose my job.

  • I'm ordering two pair because I know at some point, we'll lose one of his mittens.

  • Past tense, lost.

  • Drop the E, add a T, and the vowel changes.

  • Now, AH as in Father.

  • This can be a trick you use to help you in writing.

  • If it's the verb, if you can make it a past tense with lost, one O in lost, so one O in

  • lose.

  • That might keep you from accidentally spelling with two O's.

  • With two O's, loose, the ending is the S sound.

  • This is most commonly an adjective, meaning free.

  • Released, not secure, not tight.

  • Buying shoes for Stoney, we have to check: are they too tight?

  • Too loose?

  • Or just right?

  • Recently, I found my colleague Tom, who's been teaching American English Pronunciation

  • with me for over 10 years, mispronouncing a word.

  • I was listening to some audio he recorded for the Academy.

  • We have lots of audio training in the Academy, at RachelsEnglishAcademy.com and he recorded

  • this word.

  • In American English, it's pronounced nauseous with the SH sound.

  • Tom said: nauseous.

  • Djzz-- Djzz-- similar to sh-- but there's voice in it.

  • Sh-- Djzz-- Sh-- Djzz-- Two different sounds.

  • I did see in the dictionary that Djzz-- is an acceptable pronunciation in British English.

  • But of all the clips I found online, I only found one example of that.

  • In all the others, it was an SH or this very British pronunciation: nauseous.

  • In American English, it's with the sh-- SH sound: nauseous.

  • But look at this: the noun, nausea, the Djzz-- sound is now that most common pronunciation

  • of this word.

  • Nauseous.

  • Shh-- Adjective.

  • Nausea.

  • Djzz-- Noun.

  • Nausea.

  • A feeling of sickness in the stomach.

  • Nauseous.

  • An adjective, feeling that sickness.

  • I feel nauseous.

  • I feel like I might throw up.

  • Is there a word you've mispronounced terribly?

  • Put it in the comments below, let's support our brave learners of English by sharing our

  • own embarrassing stories.

  • It might even inspire a future video here on YouTube.

  • Click the I here if you want to see other videos of examples of words that Americans

  • sometimes mispronounce.

  • And follow me anywhere, or everywhere.

  • Keep your learning going with this video.

  • I make new videos on the English language once a week here on YouTube, be sure to subscribe

  • with notifications to catch them all, I love being your English teacher.

  • That's it and thanks so much for using Rachel's English.

I was so embarrassed.

Subtitles and vocabulary

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B1 pronunciation chic dictionary mispronounced vowel espresso

9 Words Americans Pronounce Wrong | Words Americans Mispronounce

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    Summer posted on 2021/03/30
Video vocabulary