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  • Hello. Welcome to News Review from BBC Learning English.

  • I'm Tom and joining me today is Catherine. Hi Catherine.

  • Hello Tom. Hello everybody.

  • Today's story comes from Egypt, where delays

  • continue along the Suez Canal.

  • And don't forget, if you want to test yourself on the vocabulary

  • from today's programme, we have a quiz at bbclearningenglish.com.

  • Now, let's hear more about this story from a BBC radio report:

  • So, there's a big problem in the Suez Canal in Egypt.

  • A large ship called the Ever Given got stuck in the canal

  • on March 23rd. This has caused delays in

  • what is one of the world's busiest shipping routes.

  • At the time of recording, efforts to free the ship are still going on.

  • However, it's an uncertain situation at the moment.

  • Experts are saying it could take some time

  • before the Suez Canal is fully reopened.

  • And we've got three words and expressions that you've

  • found to talk about today's story, Catherine. What are they?

  • Yes, we have: 'stricken', 'budges' and 'stretches'.

  • 'Stricken', 'budges' and 'stretches'. OK. Catherine,

  • let's have a look at your first headline for today please.

  • OK. We are starting in the United States with CNNthe headline:

  • 'Stricken' – badly affected by problems.

  • Catherine, please tell us more.

  •   Yes, 'stricken'. It's an adjective.

  • It is spelt: S-T-R-I-C-K-E-N – 'stricken'. And we

  • use it when something is... when something is in a very bad condition

  • or to describe a very serious problem. So, in this case,

  • we're talking about a 'stricken' ship.

  • The ship cannot move: it's stuck. This is a serious, serious

  • situation, which prevents the ship from doing what it normally does,

  • so we say the ship is 'stricken'.

  •   So, the strict... Excuse me...

  •   It's a mouthful! ...the ship is 'stricken'.  

  • Well, this problem that it can't move.

  • It's badly affected. Lots of other people are 'stricken' as well,

  • I assume. Can we just use 'stricken' for ships?

  • When else can we use this adjective?

  • Well, we often use it for people and we can use in a number of ways for

  • people. We can use it when something externally affects you really badly.

  • So, you can be 'stricken by poverty', for example, if you're very poor.

  • You can be 'stricken with poverty' – is a second preposition.

  • So, you can be 'stricken by' or 'with' something. And we can also

  • use it for emotions. So, you can be 'stricken with grief'.

  • So, if you have a big loss and this loss is quite disabling for you:

  • you can't function as normal.

  • Sameyou can be 'stricken by fear' or 'stricken with fear'.

  • If you're really, really frightened, you can see it in somebody's face

  • when they're 'stricken with fear'. The shock

  • you can be 'stricken by shock'. 'Stricken with panic',

  • Tomyou can be 'stricken with panic' as well.

  • So, we've got fear, shock, panic – I think you can be

  •   'stricken by disease' as well. Yes.

  • All very negative things, right? Yes.

  •   They're all problems, which will very badly affect us.

  • Yes. It's not good to be 'stricken'.

  • Let's have a look at that summary slide please:

  • So, ships can be 'stricken' with problems.

  • People can be 'stricken' with problems.

  • Penguins can also be 'stricken' with problems.

  • We have a News Review from the archive about penguins

  • who are being stranded in South America.

  • Catherine, how can our audience access this video?  

  • Really simple. Just click that link.

  • Just click that link. OK. Fantastic. Catherine,

  • let's have a look at your second headline for today please.

  • OK. Let's go to the Metro in the UKthe headline:

  • 'Budges' – What a lovely word! 'Budges' – moves.

  • Catherine, what can you tell us about 'budges'?

  • Well, I can start by telling you

  • it's a verb, Tom, and it's spelt: B-U-D-G-E-S.

  • 'Budges' – there in the third person with the 's' on the end.

  • It's all about movement and it's a very informal word. So, if you're

  • sitting on a sofa with your mate, Tom, and they're taking up too much space,

  • then you can say...?

  •   I could say, 'Budge up!' You know, 'budge up',

  • move up, 'budge over',

  • 'Budge along.'

  • Yeah, I could 'give them a budge.'

  • You could! Yes, just push them.

  • So, it's informal and it's to do with movement, right?

  • Are there any other kind of ways that we can use 'budges' or 'budge'?

  • Well, we've just done some examples of using 'budge' to

  • describe things that are moving, but we can also use

  • 'budge' in the negative to describe things that won't move.

  • And this is really common – a common way of using the word 'budge'.

  • So, you've got that bottle of tomato ketchup,

  • Tom. You've got your fish and chips and you just want... or just your chips,

  • if you're a vegan, and you want to put tomato ketchup on and you're

  • trying to get that bottle top off and you really go 'aaaargh'...

  • And it won't move itit won't... It 'won't budge'!

  • ...it won't budge. It won't budge at all.

  • OK. So, 'budge' – it can have a literal meaning about, sort of, physical

  • movement, but we can also use it in a figurative way as well, right?

  • Yes, we can. We can use it to describe people who are very stubborn,

  • or their ideas, or plans, or things that they're not going to change.

  • Now imagine, Tom, you're selling your bicycle,

  • aren't you, for £100?

  • But I give you a call. Good price!

  • Yes! And I say, 'Tom? Mates rates

  • come on, do it for 90. I'll give you £90 for your bike.'

  • What do you say?

  • Well, I'm going to say, 'Catherine,

  • I'm a very stubborn person. I don't want to move from my position.

  • So, unfortunately, I won't budge.' I won't move. I could also say,

  • 'Sorry, you know, I just refuse to budge.'

  • Nice fixed expression: to 'refuse to budge'.

  • And we use it not just when we're selling things,

  • but you can talk about any sort of fixed idea:

  • politicians often 'refuse to budge' when they've made a decision about

  • something and they won't change it.

  •   They won't 'budge an inch', right?

  • Won't budge an inch!

  • So, that sounds like a very familiar expression

  • but, before we get to that, let's take a look at our summary slide please:

  • 'Not budge an inch'. This is quite an old expression, right, Catherine?

  • It is. It appeared even in a Shakespeare play and we did a

  • lovely little animation about it. If you want to watch the animation,

  • learn more about Shakespeare's phrase 'not budge an inch', just click the link.

  • Great. Catherine, let's have a look at your next headline, please.

  • Yes, we're still in the UK with the Telegraph:

  • 'Stretches' – becomes longer than normal.

  • Catherine, tell us about this word 'stretches'.

  • Yes, this one is also a verb in the third person.

  • The spelling is: S-T-R-E-T-C-H-E-S. The pronunciation: 'stretches'.

  • So, 'stretch' – when... As a verb when could I 'stretch'?

  •   Or when might we 'stretch'?

  • Well, you can use 'stretch' first thing in the morning, Tom.

  • As soon as you wake up, what do you do?

  • I give it one of these. Aaaah!

  • I kind of make my arms a bit longer than normal.

  • I 'stretch' my muscles. Good example.

  • Yes. And then you jump out of bed because you've had a great 'stretch'

  • and you put on your 'stretch jeans', don't you, Tom?

  • I do, yes. So, if my jeans 'stretch', they kind of become longer than normal

  • so they fit my legs perfectly, right?

  • That's right, yes. So, anything that becomes

  • a little bit longer than normal, we can describe that as a 'stretch'.

  • Now, I'm not sure, but I think we're talking about ships here,

  • not... not what I do in the... Yes, yes.

  • ...not what I do in the morning.

  • So, why is this word 'stretch' important in the headline?

  • OK. Well, the ship itself isn't 'stretching'.

  • The ship is the same length. It's not become abnormal.

  • But the time that is... it is stuck.

  • is becoming longer, and longer, and longer and none of this is normal.

  • So, we're using 'stretch' to describe

  • time here. Interestingly, 'stretch' is also the name, as a noun,

  • that we can give to a body of water, especially a river or a canal.

  • So, the headline writers have done what headline writers love to do:

  • they've used a word with a double meaning.

  • So, the time is 'stretching' and this ship is also in a 'stretch of water'.

  • So, the time's 'stretching', it's in a 'stretch of water' –

  • Do you think maybe it's also because the ship is very long?

  • Do you think this is why they put it in there?

  • Errr... I think that's a bit of a stretch, actually.

  • OK. That example's much better! A 'bit of a stretch'.

  • What do you mean, Catherine, when you say 'a bit of a stretch'?

  • Yeah, another meaning of the word 'stretch' is when... we use a 'stretch'

  • or the phrase 'a bit of a stretch' to describe something that's unlikely,

  • or really out of the ordinary. Not... or quite difficult.

  • So, for example, if you said to me:

  •   'Tom, let's do another News Review straight after this one.'

  •   I could say, 'I'm not sure Catherine...'

  • That would be quite tricky.

  •   That would be quite tricky or that would be 'a bit of a stretch'.

  • You know, it would be unlikely, or quite difficult to do.

  • Yes. Good example.

  • OK. Great. Well, it's not 'a bit of a stretch'...

  • ...to get a summary slide up, so let's have a look at that one please:

  • Fantastic. Catherine,

  • can you please give us a recap of today's vocabulary?

  • I can. We had: 'stricken' – strongly affected by problems.

  • We had: 'budges' – moves.

  • And 'stretches' – becomes longer than normal.

  • Lovely. And don't forget that we have a quiz,

  •   so test yourself on it at bbclearningenlish.com.

  • And of course we are all over social media as well.

  • That's it from us today.

  • Thanks for being here and we'll see you next time.

  • Goodbye. Bye!

Hello. Welcome to News Review from BBC Learning English.

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B1 catherine headline canal describe longer stretch

Suez Canal: Delays continue - News Review

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    林宜悉 posted on 2021/03/30
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