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  • While some rich people like to brag about  their expensive Ferraris and Rolex watches,  

  • the truly wealthy can find ways to spend incredible amounts of money on even the most ordinary of objects

  • Such as, say, a mango.

  • That's rightthere is a mango out there that costs thousands of dollars.

  • So that's really not an item you want to throw in the back of your fridge, forget about and let it spoil.

  • Just like last week's Chinese takeout. But what  mango costs so much? And for what possible reason?  

  • For all you wealthy fruit lovers out therewe sent our investigative team to find out.

  • Most mangoes in the world are produced in Indiawhich is responsible for 46% of the global trade.  

  • There are some disagreements on what the most expensive type of mango in the world is,

  • with each country wanting to promote their own types as the priciest, and therefore, highest quality.

  • However, most reputable sources cite the Miyazaki Mango from Japan as the world's most expensive mango.

  • A pair of Miyazaki mangoes have been known to sell for as much as $3600!

  • They are better known by the impressive moniker "Egg  of the Sun" or "Taiyo-no-Tamago" in Japanese.

  • Considering the mango is native to South Asia, considered the national fruit of India and Pakistan,

  • and the national tree of Bangladesh,

  • how is it possible that the most expensive variety grows thousands of miles away in Japan?

  • After all, the island nation didn't even start producing mangos until the mid 1980s. 

  • That makes it almost offensive to the rest of the mango-producing countries for Japan to have the most expensive variety in the world.

  • Actually, the Taiyo no Tamago mangoes are specifically grown in only the Miyazaki Prefecture of Japan, hence the name, on the island of Kyushu in the southern part of the country,  

  • where the climate is much closer to the parts of India than you'd think.

  • This part of Japan has a tropical climate with heavy rainfall, which combine to form ideal mango-growing conditions.

  • Farmers on Kyushu island have a history of growing expensive niche fruit.   

  • Hey, everyone has to be known for something. They were previously known for growing the Satsume mandarin orange,  

  • and still cultivate other local delicacies found pretty much only in this part of the world.

  • In fact, farmers in the area only pivoted to mangoes when other Japanese farmers started competing with them in the cutthroat world of orange production,

  • and the resulting flood of oranges on the market made prices drop.

  • But what makes Miyazaki mangoes in particular so expensive?

  • The first clue as to the Miyazaki mango's quality and price might come from the way they're presented and packaged.

  • The ruby red Miyazaki mangoes usually come in pairs in a cushioned box.

  • That's right, most of us will haphazardly throw our $800 smartphone on the counter, on our desks, and let's be honestprobably drop it on the floor several times a day,  

  • but these mangoes are so extra special, they need to be gently delivered in a cushioned box.

  • The mangoes are also uniformly a deep, rich red color. How do they obtain such a beautiful color?

  • Well, they're grown in a very unique and  time consuming way.   

  • Each small baby mango is placed in an individual net suspended on a wire from the top of the greenhouse they reside in.

  • The seeds from which Miyazaki mangoes are grown are pretty much the same as the seeds for any other red mango

  • It's the special TLC farmers give these mangoes that make them the expensive, quality fruits they are.

  • The net the farmers set up around each seed allows the mango to grow in an almost perfect round shape.

  • There is also a reflector placed underneath to ensure that sunlight hits it pretty uniformly.

  • Thus, the Miyazaki mangoes get their deep, rich red color from the sun shining on them in this process.

  • If any other small fruits start budding out from the plant, the farmers remove them

  • to make sure all the nutrients are going to the prized Egg-of-the-Sun mango instead.

  • Instead of harvesting the mangoes themselves, farmers take their sweet time waiting until the mangoes are fully ripe, and therefore at their sweetest, and fall from the tree into the net.  

  • Thanks to our global addiction to sugary treats,  

  • this sweetness is also what gives the Miyazaki mangoes their high value.

  • Taiyo no Tamago, much like fine wine and premium cuts of steakmust pass quality control

  • This control ensures that they have a 15% sugar content and weigh at least 350 grams, or 12.3 ounces.

  • In other  words, two times as heavy as your average hamster,

  • which, unlike Miyazaki mangoes, is hopefully not a part of your healthy, balanced diet.

  • We should point out that 12.3 ounces isn't particularly heavy for a mango.  

  • Some varieties grow up to five poundswhich, depending on how out of shape you are, could even be used for weight training instead of food.

  • Those who have the disposable income to taste the Miyazaki mango report it's flavor is almost candy-like, with a hint of pineapple and coconut.

  • That taste sounds just like the tropical cocktails people slam down in Cancun resorts before making terrible decisions.

  • Alright, so the color is pretty and uniform, the shape of the fruit is tightly controlled,

  • and the taste will give you a toddler-like sugar rushBut still, thousands of dollars for a mango? Why?

  • Well, the truth is most Miyazaki mangoes don't fetch nearly that high a price tag.   

  • Don't get us wrong, the Taiyo no Tamago is still not am usual item on the average person's grocery run.  

  • A regular pair will generally sell for $50 in the market,

  • and the prized mangoes bearing the highest sugar content and 350-gram weight aren't even sold in grocery stores.

  • In Japanthey are usually sold at department stores as gifts. We'll get to that later.

  • However, the high price fetched for some of these mangoes, including one sold for almost 300,000 rupees, $3600 at the time, are fetched at auctions, not in stores.   

  • If you're wondering who in the world  is going to auctions to bid on fruit,  

  • the answer is, mostly buyers on behalf of large distributors, such as various store chains.

  • In this instance, the high price isn't about the actual value of the mangoes;

  • rather, it's an incentive for farmers to encourage them to keep growing this fruit,

  • as buyers think it will be lucrative, and want to encourage demand for the mango, or maybe they just find it delicious.

  • We mentioned the fact that these mangoes are usually sold as gifts.  

  • This isn't that unusual in Japanwhich has a long history of fruit gifting.

  • Boutique fruit markets have been a thing in Japan since around the early 19th century,   

  • and the custom of fruit gifting goes back way before  that.   

  • Customs using fruit as ritual offerings exist in both the Shinto and Buddhist religionsthe two main religions of the Japanese people.

  • In Buddhism, fruits are often used as temple offerings

  • They are left at the altar until they are ready to be eaten by either the family who made the offer, or a tightly knit community of worshipers at the altar.

  • When the meal of fruit is finally shared,  

  • it's supposed to bestow a blessing on all those who eat it.  

  • Hopefully accompanied by less judgment and passive aggressive bickering than your average family meal.

  • Fruit placed on the Shinto altar has a slightly different significance.  

  • Since Shinto altars usually honor devotees' ancestors,  

  • the fruit on the Shinto altar connects the devout with the spirits of those who came before them.

  • These days, high-end fruits have also become a prized gift in Japan for formal or even business occasions.

  • Employees may give fruits like Miyazaki mangoes to their bosses,  

  • or companies might give them to high-end clients.

  • This shouldn't be that surprising to anyone used to US culture, as fruit baskets are pretty commonplace in the States as well.

  • So that's how the Miyazaki mangoes are bought and given.   

  • Few people are dropping $50 on "Eggs of the Sun" because they are hungry and need a sweet afternoon snack.  

  • In fact, recipients usually take the gifts as such a sign of respect from the gift giver that they would rather display them than eat them.

  • No word on how long those displays last before the whole living room starts to smell like a spoiling, sugary mess.

  • Now that you've learned about the "Eggs of  the Sun," the most expensive mangoes in the world,  

  • tell us, if you dropped $3600 on a pair of mangoes, would you display them or eat them?

  • Or is there any other food you'd be willing to drop $3600 on instead if you were guaranteed the highest quality product

  • Please let us know below, and in the meantimeclick on this video or the next one right here to learn about interesting customsstories, and objects from around the world!

While some rich people like to brag about  their expensive Ferraris and Rolex watches,  

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World’s Most Expensive Mango

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    林宜悉 posted on 2021/04/21
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