Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • Who doesn't love their dogs?

  • Whether your dog is a small, mischievous Snoopy or a big, rambunctious Marmaduke, the odds

  • are a dog person has spent countless hours playing with their pooch, taking them for

  • walks, and watching them play with other dogs in the dog park.

  • Many people describe their dogs as members of the family and feel like they've developed

  • a true lifelong bond with them.

  • But there's one thing holding that bond back - language.

  • As smart as our dogs are - and some can pull off some pretty impressive tricks - they're

  • still lost in their own world, and it's hard to tell what that bark or whine means.

  • It's pretty common for dogs to behave in confusing, strange, or annoying ways - but

  • most of these common behaviors have meanings, and knowing them can make it easier to establish

  • a rapport with your dog.

  • All dog owners know this behavior is a challenge - especially late at night.

  • Dogs love to bark.

  • That's why people keep them as guard dogs, so they'll be alerted if someone is breaking

  • into the house in the middle of the night.

  • But why do some dogs seem to bark at everything - passing squirrels and birds, other dogs,

  • cars, you when you come home, you when you leave?

  • Some of it is typical protective behavior - dogs see other dogs encroaching on their

  • territory as a threat.

  • But other times, it can be a symptom of a lack of stimulation.

  • If a dog is bored or anxious, its bark reflexes may go into overdrive.

  • Distracting them and giving them something else to focus on can help calm them down and

  • quiet the house down for a while.

  • But what if their bark ISN'T worse than their bite?

  • Dogs that bite are a serious problem, and a dog that attacks people can wind up in serious

  • trouble with animal control.

  • But not all dog bites are an act of hostility.

  • Dogs, especially puppies, partially explore the world with their mouths.

  • Little nips aren't an attack, and the dog should be taught to control itself with gentle

  • discipline.

  • But a dog that has a habit of biting as it gets older might have other behavior problems.

  • This could be a reaction to fear, feeling backed into a corner, or a response to being

  • in pain.

  • If dog training techniques aren't working, it may be time to take the dog to the vet

  • to check that there's no medical reason for the biting.

  • Of course, people aren't the only thing dogs bite.

  • Oh no!

  • The antique sofa!

  • Dogs love to chew on things, and this is both a common behavior and a natural one that serves

  • a physical purpose.

  • They need to keep their teeth active, and young dogs do it to relieve teething pain

  • and to explore the world.

  • It can also be a common behavior when bored or anxious.

  • Dealing with dog chewing is less a matter of when they chew - they'll always want

  • to chew - than what they chew.

  • This behavior can be handled pretty easily by keeping valuables out of reach, distracting

  • them when they go for the sofa, and making sure they have a supply of durable dog toys

  • and rawhide bones to chew on.

  • But maybe not those squeaky toys when you're trying to sleep.

  • And there's another area of the house where they can cause a lot of damage.

  • Not the Azaleas?

  • Yes, dogs love to dig.

  • Who hasn't seen them playfully digging a hole and burying their favorite bone?

  • This is more common among dogs like terriers with a history as a hunting breed, but it's

  • a common way of playing for all dogs.

  • It only stops being fun when the dog digs up your carefully curated garden.

  • This can also be caused by boredom or anxiety, the desire to hide something from other dogs,

  • or seeking a place to hide.

  • This can usually be resolved by giving the dog positive reinforcement when it digs in

  • good places - and steering it away when it digs in places you don't want to be disturbed.

  • But carefully watch that the dog isn't digging its way out of the yard.

  • Dogs are evolved from hunting animals, and that plays into many of their behaviors.

  • Chasing things is one of those behaviors that all depends on the context.

  • It's a lot of fun when your dog chases that ball or toy mouse.

  • But if it's chasing the cat, other dogs, or random cars, it can become a problem.

  • Does the dog actually want to catch them, or is it just a display of dominance?

  • This is usually a display of predatory instinct, and it's not usually something you can fully

  • train out of a dog - it's in their DNA.

  • The best way to handle this is to keep the dog on a leash when you know they're likely

  • to be around something they want to chase and make sure they have lots of opportunities

  • for off-leash play in the yard and at dog parks.

  • Of course, modern dogs have their own ways of getting things they want.

  • A dog begging at the dinner table can be cute, especially when they give you those eyes!

  • It's enough to make you want to slip them a meatball under the table - but that's

  • a sure way to keep them coming back for more.

  • Plus, human foods aren't always good for dogs.

  • They love food, they love attention, and getting food from the table is a special treat.

  • As long as they're getting enough food, they're not begging out of hunger, so the

  • best way to stop this behavior is to hold firm.

  • Maybe take the dog to another room, or let the dog out before dinner if you have a safe

  • backyard for them to play.

  • A friendly dog is great - but some are a little too friendly.

  • If a dog likes to greet you by jumping up on you, it can be cute - but it can also be

  • unsanitary, and lead to you dropping things.

  • This is usually just the dog seeking attention and showing enthusiasm, but it can also be

  • an attempt to get something they want out of their person's hand.

  • The dog is usually seeking a reaction, so scolding them or trying to fend them off when

  • they jump up can backfire.

  • If you want to deter a dog from jumping up, the best way can be to just ignore them until

  • they calm down.

  • Dogs love their people - but sometimes that can be a little overwhelming.

  • Have you ever dealt with a clingy dog?

  • Dog separation anxiety is a common problem, especially for young dogs or dogs who have

  • previously been in rough situations.

  • If a dog becomes anxious when the owner tries to leave or follows the owner around constantly,

  • it's probably a sign of the dog having past trauma over being abandoned or left alone.

  • Not all cases where dogs misbehave when left alone are this, though - some are just rambunctious

  • dogs acting out.

  • But if a dog seems incapable of being without its owner, it may need some behavioral therapy

  • to work through it.

  • Of course, some dog behaviors can be a bit less...palatable.

  • It's kind of funny to watch a dog scoot its butt along the carpet, but not exactly

  • sanitary.

  • But what makes them do this?

  • It can actually be a sign of a medical condition, and if it happens frequently, it's probably

  • time to take the pup to the vet.

  • They may have backed-up anal glands that need to be taken care of, or they may have an infection

  • or allergies that are irritating that sensitive area.

  • For less serious reasons, if your dog likes to eat grass, it may have some stalks stuck

  • there.

  • You can take care of that yourself - with some gloves, naturally.

  • What is it with dogs and poop anyway?

  • Dogs eating poop is one of the weirdest and grossest things dog owners see, but there

  • are a couple of good reasons for that.

  • Dogs sometimes do it when they don't get enough nutrients from their food, so make

  • sure they're being fed a balanced diet.

  • It can also be caused by curiosity, or fear if the dog has been yelled at for pooping

  • before.

  • They may also be mimicking their mother, who cleaned them up as a puppy.

  • But this usually isn't a serious behavior, and if you want to avoid it it's best to

  • just distract the dog or gently guide them away.

  • Dog owners spend a lot of time with their dogs, and they'll often notice a lot of

  • odd little behaviors that don't always make sense.

  • Who hasn't seen a dog panting after a long run or on a hot day?

  • This is how dogs regulate heat - unlike us, they don't expel heat and moisture through

  • their skin the same way.

  • They release most of their body heat through their mouths, so by actively panting when

  • they're getting overheated, they regulate their heat and cool themselves down.

  • Imagine if we were all walking around during the summer with our tongues hanging out.

  • But if they're doing it when they're not hot, it can also be a sign of pain that should

  • be checked out by a vet.

  • This next behavior can be cute - but can have different causes.

  • Is there anything cuter than a yawning puppy?

  • Your sleepy pooch could be your ticket to a million YouTube hits, but it's also not

  • always a sign of fatigue.

  • Yawning can be a sign of a tired dog, but it can also be a sign of fear or stress.

  • Dogs may yawn more when around an unfamiliar person, and that can be a sign that it's

  • time to back off of the encounter.

  • Either way, if a dog is yawning, it's probably time to let them back off and relax a bit.

  • Speaking of cute behaviors, this next one is a classic.

  • Ever notice how your dog tilts its head to one side when it's trying to figure something

  • out?

  • This looks like a sign of confusion - you can almost see the little question marks over

  • their head.

  • And this can be a sign of uncertainty or waiting for future instruction from their owner or

  • trainer.

  • It can also happen when the dog is trying to carefully listen to a sound - they have

  • an excellent sense of hearing and may be craning their head to find the source of something

  • you can't even hear.

  • Dogs' ears are one of the most expressive parts - and can tell you all sorts of things.

  • What does it mean if your dog's ears are pricked - suddenly standing up on end?

  • This is usually a sign of curiosity or excitement.

  • They're probably ready to play or chase something, and the ears will go flat if they're

  • scared, sad, or insecure.

  • For humans, it's all in the eyes - but for dogs, it's all in the ears.

  • But what does it mean if their ears are a bit more...active?

  • When a dog is flicking its ears up and down, it's usually a sign that it just heard something

  • unfamiliar.

  • If you're in a safe place like the backyard or the park, the odds are that an animal just

  • jumped in and they're trying to track it down.

  • But if it happens in a place where there shouldn't be anything unfamiliar around, it may be worth

  • listening carefully yourself - another area where dogs are a great early warning system.

  • Dog's senses are very strong - and they can often give you an early warning.

  • If your dog is sniffing the air, that's another sign that something unusual is up.

  • If they're barking or growling, that might be a standard sign of high alert, but this

  • is something else.

  • They don't know what it is and they want to learn more information.

  • They may have sensed danger, but they may have also smelled something they're just

  • unfamiliar with, like a new visitor to their home.

  • If your dog is sniffing the new visitor, that's not a problem - they're probably trying

  • to see if it's a friend.

  • But there's one response that should be cause for concern.

  • If your dog wrinkles its muzzle, that's a sure-fire sign that something is wrong.

  • The dog is angry or aggressive, and the next step could be showing its teeth and snarling.

  • This is a warning, and if the dog is this keyed up, the best approach is probably to

  • separate the dog and whatever's making it so upset.

  • Better a delayed first meeting than an unfortunate dog bite.

  • But what about when your dog lets out a more primal sound?

  • Dogs are descended from wolves, and wolves love to howl.

  • But it can be a bit unsettling when you hear your pooch let out a howl from the backyard.

  • This is usually a sign of loneliness, and the dog may be trying to let people know where

  • it is.

  • If a dog is howling through the night, they may be struggling to get used to being away

  • from its owner.

  • Short howls, though, can be a sign of a satisfied or excited dog.

  • Of course, most dogs are usually happy - and they have some great ways of showing it.

  • Has your dog ever lay down and exposed its belly to you?

  • This is a sign of vulnerability, and it shows that your dog trusts you.

  • They're showing their vulnerable part and showing respect to the master.

  • And hey, that fluffy dog belly looks pretty soft.

  • Don't be afraid to pet it - not only is it going to give you a good feeling, but it'll

  • show your dog that you can be trusted and it's safe to expose the belly around you.

  • And of course, there's the one most famous dog behavior.

  • Is there anything that says “I'm a happy dogmore than a wagging tail?

  • This means the dog is friendly and happy, but there are subtle differences.

  • A rapid wag in a downward direction shows submissiveness, while a slow natural wag means

  • alertness and readiness to play.

  • A slow high wag means an excited and confident dog.

  • A slow downward wag can mean a sad or confused dog, but in most cases, a wagging tail means

  • a happy and healthy dog.

  • Be wary of a rapidly wagging, stiff tail though- as this could be a sign of aggressive energy.

  • And as all dog owners know, a happy and healthy dog means a happy owner.

  • For more on man's best friend, check outAmazing Survival Story of a Dog Saving

  • a Humanor watch this video instead.

Who doesn't love their dogs?

Subtitles and vocabulary

Operation of videos Adjust the video here to display the subtitles

B1 sign behavior chew bark wag owner

Why Your Dog Does This - Explained

  • 6 0
    林宜悉 posted on 2021/03/16
Video vocabulary