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  • - Michael said, "Kobe, I'm not using my guy anymore,

  • "why don't you give him a call?"

  • Kobe says, "Well tell me about Grover."

  • And he goes, "Man, Grover really, really knows his stuff,"

  • but he goes, "But he's the biggest asshole

  • "you will ever meet."

  • One of the nicest things Michael's ever said to me,

  • because he didn't call me a asshole,

  • he called me the asshole.

  • Well if you're gonna strive for something,

  • never strive to be a.

  • A is a part of a group, the, you stand out.

  • [upbeat music]

  • Tim Grover, company is Attack Athletics,

  • title is Sports Enhancement Specialist.

  • Kobe Bryant's trainer from 2007 to 2012.

  • I've always admired Kobe when I was training Michael.

  • Everyone said he's the next one,

  • so I've always kind of watched him,

  • and saw him coming in and out of the United Center,

  • and so forth.

  • But in 2007, he actually called Michael,

  • and said, "Hey listen, my knees are absolutely killing me."

  • Because Kobe had came into the league when he was 17,

  • so he had had a lot of miles on his legs already.

  • People forget about that, that he came in

  • at such a young age,

  • and was playing at a very young age.

  • So, he goes, "You think you could help me out?"

  • I said, "I don't think I can help you out,

  • "I know I can help you out."

  • And he goes, "I'll see you tomorrow."

  • [upbeat music]

  • Once I got the medical history,

  • I talked to a bunch of individuals

  • that had been doing work with Kobe,

  • kind of getting what his regimen was,

  • what he was doing, how often he'd workout,

  • so once I got the resources put together,

  • I flew out to LA, sat down with him.

  • We started to go through the regimen

  • and the problem with his knees were,

  • he was basically doing too much.

  • This is a common problem that's happened now.

  • You have so many experts involved.

  • You have your trainer, you have your massage therapist,

  • you have your muscle activation guy.

  • Everybody's pulling everybody

  • in all these different directions,

  • because everybody wants the credit for the client.

  • You gotta get everybody on the same page.

  • If I need an individual to shorten

  • a certain group of muscles, or leave them alone,

  • and lengthen others, and then you're seeing something,

  • and you're doing the complete opposite,

  • that's never gonna benefit the athlete,

  • so when I came in, I told Kobe, I said,

  • "If I'm gonna do this, I have to be the person in charge."

  • I said, "You can continue to work with everybody,"

  • but I said, "I have to be in charge,

  • "I have to know everything that's happening,"

  • and then once we got everybody on the same page,

  • we actually decreased the amount of workload he was doing,

  • and cause Kobe is another one of the persons

  • that his biggest obsession was

  • to have more championships than Michael.

  • You know, if you were to ask him

  • when he was gonna retire, he would say,

  • "After number seven."

  • He didn't say, he never bought it in years,

  • because Michael had won six, so his goal was seven.

  • One of the biggest differences

  • between the two is, Michael always knew when it was enough,

  • and he would listen to you.

  • You know, if you told him that's it, that's it.

  • With Kobe, to him, that's it meant,

  • that's it for that moment,

  • but three hours later I can start back up again,

  • and he never really got out of that mentality,

  • which I don't blame him,

  • because that's what made him successful.

  • It's hard to understand that sometimes you need

  • to do less to get more.

  • So I get everybody in the room.

  • We pool all the information together,

  • and I don't come in and say, "I'm right."

  • Let's everybody understand what's going on,

  • and figure out how to cure this ailment.

  • Just like basketball is a team sport,

  • getting an individual healthy is a team sport.

  • [upbeat music]

  • When I started with Kobe, what did I have to do?

  • We had to rebuild the whole foundation again.

  • We had this super athlete,

  • who had all the beautiful things,

  • had the expensive kitchen,

  • had all the great appliances, had the cars,

  • but the foundation of the house wasn't taken care of.

  • What is foundation?

  • Foundation is solid cement.

  • It's solid brick.

  • You build foundation by lifting weights.

  • The fastest, quickest way to get an athlete stronger,

  • is through moving metal.

  • How can you have a sport now,

  • when you have so much more technology,

  • you have so much more resources,

  • less contact, and the, more injuries.

  • It's mind boggling to me.

  • It's because everything is rubber bands,

  • everything is resistance, everything is cable.

  • There's teams now in the NBA

  • that don't even have a weight room.

  • You still have to move iron.

  • It's the one greatest form of injury prevention,

  • because you do a compound movement,

  • it sends the muscles, and the electric stimulus

  • that goes into the body,

  • that cannot be duplicated by cables,

  • it cannot be duplicated by body work,

  • it cannot be duplicated by medicine balls,

  • and there's all the studies that are out there to prove it.

  • But, everyone gets back into sport specific.

  • It doesn't look good.

  • All right, it's too simplistic.

  • It is very simplistic, but,

  • you're building the foundation.

  • And this is nothing new.

  • This goes back to when they built the pyramids.

  • If you start adding pulleys and cables,

  • it's not true resistance.

  • When you play basketball, you play football,

  • you play baseball, you play soccer,

  • whatever you play, when you get hit,

  • when you jump, when you land,

  • there's no pulleys, there's no cables.

  • Your body weight is the meta.

  • You have to learn how to explode with it,

  • and you also need to learn how to land with it,

  • and how to stop it, and that's what metal does.

  • It teaches you to lift it,

  • but it also teaches you to put it down.

  • Accelerate and de accelerate.

  • With Kobe, everything was acceleration.

  • He had a Ferrari and a Lamborghini acceleration,

  • and he had a sub car performance brakes in it.

  • Here everyone talks about, you know,

  • well how fast can a person go

  • from one end to the court to the other?

  • Well I wanna know how quickly a person can go

  • from one end to the other,

  • and stop on a certain particular point.

  • I need you to be able to de accelerate,

  • so what he had, he had a major imbalance

  • between the muscles that accelerated,

  • and the muscles that de accelerated,

  • and that was causing the issues on his knees.

  • So what we had to do was,

  • for all your years, you've been shortening muscles,

  • because that's what most training does.

  • It's a contraction of a muscle.

  • So we put a whole new regimen into his program,

  • where everything was lengthening of the muscle,

  • to lengthen, lengthen, lengthen.

  • So there's three types of contractions that you have.

  • You have the isometric contraction,

  • which is static, where the contraction doesn't move.

  • You have the concentric contraction,

  • which is a shortening of the muscle,

  • and you have the eccentric contraction,

  • which is the lengthening of the muscle.

  • We totally took the concentric phase

  • out of his training, totally.

  • Very difficult to do because the way

  • to overload a muscle through an eccentric phase,

  • you're stronger on a lengthening of a muscle

  • than you are on a shortening of a muscle.

  • Let's take a simple leg press movement.

  • Most people when they do it,

  • you have the weights setup, and you push out,

  • and you bring the weight back.

  • I wouldn't allow him to push out.

  • We would literally have two or three of us,

  • we would push the weight out,

  • have him place his feet on there,

  • and just have him come bring the weight back slowly.

  • We were able to create a more of a space

  • in between his knees, so there was less friction there,

  • so if you had less friction,

  • the chondromalacia, and the different,

  • the tendonitis and the stuff that was happening on his knees

  • was starting to get alleviated.

  • We were able to identify all that

  • with the rest of his team, and everybody started

  • to work on concentrating on lengthening everything,

  • and lengthening is so much more painful than shortening,

  • but the one thing you know about Kobe,

  • this guy's pain tolerance was off the charts.

  • [upbeat music]

  • People always say, you should have posted more

  • of Kobe's workouts on social media.

  • I said, "If I posted Kobe's workouts on social media,

  • "we'd literally be posting something four times a day."

  • That's how focused he was in his pursuit of excellence,

  • and his pursuit of championships.

  • Kobe was like, everyone said you won the championships

  • because of Shaq, but when Shaw was traded to Miami,

  • Kobe wanted to prove that he could win not one championship,

  • he could win multiple championships without Shaq,

  • and that's when I was there.

  • Kobe wanted that pressure,

  • so he knew he had to become more effective,

  • he had to get his teammates involved.

  • Kobe was as hard on his teammates as Michael was.

  • He was just as hard, and as competitive, in practice.

  • Everybody watched films of the current players.

  • Kobe would tell these guys to get film

  • of players going way back.

  • Jerry West, Oscar Robertson, Pete Maravich.

  • He goes, "I wanna see what those guys did

  • "to be successful."

  • A lot of people don't know this,

  • is Kobe knew four or five languages very fluently.

  • I'm talking about fluently.

  • Obviously English, Italian, Spanish,

  • and I know he had started working on like Mandarin.

  • I mean those aren't easy languages.

  • I mean, I'm talking about fluent,

  • like he could have a conversation

  • with individuals in those languages.

  • Pau Gasol was one of his teammates, the Spaniard,

  • so they would communicate on the court in Spanish,

  • so the other team wouldn't know

  • what they were talking about.

  • And the reason he ended up learning Mandarin so well,

  • is because he saw the explosion in China basketball

  • before everybody else did.

  • So he goes, "How can I endear myself

  • "to this culture even more?"

  • He says, "Yeah okay, a lot of players just go over there,

  • "but what if I can give a press conference

  • "in their language?"

  • You know, the greats, they show up early, they stay late.

  • There's times where you'll see Kobe

  • and the athletic trainer throw a towel over the finger,

  • yank it back, and go right back in the game,

  • because Kobe doesn't wanna miss that time.

  • Same thing with his shoulder,