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  • JENNY: To celebrate Women's History Month, today

  • we are joined by Sarah Amos from Marvel New Media.

  • And we're talking Walt Disney Animation Studios' "Raya

  • and the Last Dragon."

  • I'm Jenny.

  • I'm Andre.

  • And we're your hosts for "What's Up, Disney+,"

  • where we talk all things Disney+.

  • Let's welcome our first guest.

  • She is the vice president of development and production

  • at Marvel New Media, and she's the executive producer

  • of "Marvel's 616" and Marvel's "Behind the Mask."

  • Sarah Amos, thank you so much for joining us today.

  • Hey, guys.

  • Thank you so much for having me.

  • I'm really excited to be here.

  • Well, we are excited to have you here today.

  • Can you tell us a little bit about yourself,

  • and what got you started in filmmaking?

  • I just love storytelling.

  • I love picking a topic or getting to dive into an area

  • of history or something that's interesting to me

  • that perhaps I thought I knew, and then, through the process

  • of filmmaking, discover a whole new side of that story that

  • maybe is unexpected, maybe brings out

  • emotion, maybe inspires someone watching at home.

  • Oh, that's great.

  • And what led you to Marvel New Media specifically?

  • I was lucky enough to get brought

  • on as we were kind of building up the New Media team.

  • To me, it just all clicked in exactly the right way.

  • And I was so lucky to get to join the team

  • and really help kind of spearhead

  • a couple of bigger nonfiction projects that started

  • to dive more into the history and the characters,

  • and maybe sides of Marvel Comics that people

  • didn't know existed.

  • From movies to documentaries to comics,

  • Marvel has told so many groundbreaking

  • stories over the years.

  • Are there any in particular that you've connected with the most?

  • At the heart of what Marvel is, it is human stories.

  • And it is about our characters.

  • And you can put them through the ringer.

  • So I love "Moon Girl and Devil Dinosaur."

  • I love "Squirrel Girl."

  • I think anyone who wants some humor in their comics

  • is-- yeah, see?

  • You're in.

  • The one that I'm absolutely obsessed with

  • is everything X-Men.

  • There's not a single X-Men comic that comes out these days

  • that I'm not giddy to pick up.

  • You helped bring some amazing nonfiction

  • Marvel stories to Disney+.

  • What made you want to bring people behind the scenes,

  • and what do you hope to discover there?

  • My hope is that everyone takes away something

  • a little different, right?

  • I think the beauty of Marvel is that there

  • is a comic book or a character for everyone, right?

  • You can love drama, or comedy, or action-adventure.

  • You can find the thing that you connect with.

  • And we tried to do the same thing with "616," getting

  • to learn more about the history of kind of how Marvel

  • Comics came to be, and maybe some unsung heroes that you

  • hadn't heard of before, getting to watch a comic book get made.

  • We actually follow one of our amazing writers, Dan Slott.

  • And you get to see the artists at work.

  • To see the way our characters and our stories

  • can really affect people's lives.

  • All of those are kind of real human connection and real life

  • lessons, and kind of inspirations, that I

  • hope people get to enjoy and experience

  • when they watch the series.

  • I loved episode 2 of "Marvel's 616",

  • "Higher, Further, Faster," because it breaks

  • down the misconception that comics are

  • only created by men, for men.

  • So how did it feel to spotlight all of these amazing women

  • behind Marvel Comics?

  • That episode is so special to us.

  • Gillian Jacobs came on really early into the series.

  • And she has a real passion and a dedication

  • to help telling the stories of women who were involved

  • in industries that may be predominantly get seen

  • as male-dominated industries.

  • I think, for me, just getting to learn myself and become

  • educated about these incredible creators, and the journey

  • for women throughout Marvel Comics,

  • was really one of the best things.

  • And seeing the future of where Marvel Comics is going,

  • and the way that we are expanding to include more

  • voices, and to make sure all points of view are represented,

  • and to hopefully put out a product that young girls can

  • pick up or read on their phones and say,

  • hey, I see myself in that.

  • And this inspires me to want to be a part

  • of that industry one day.

  • Like, that's the best thing to get to do.

  • Yeah, it's really empowering, because I

  • feel like shows like this are going to make such a massive--

  • probably already are making such a massive impact

  • on both boys and girls, because just five years ago,

  • me wearing this shirt would get me questioned.

  • "You're a fake geek girl!

  • You're not really-- you don't read the comics.

  • You don't know what you're talking about.

  • You're just wearing a shirt because you think it's cool."

  • And I think, with shows like "Marvel's 616,"

  • audiences get to see, "oh, there are women, lots of women,

  • behind some of my favorite characters and stories,

  • and people of color--" just an array of people

  • that I think the average person doesn't expect.

  • It's a thing of, oh, it's only guys.

  • The larger media perception has been wrong for a long time.

  • And it is assumed that the fanbase only

  • looked like one type of person.

  • And that has not been the case.

  • A lot of the most die-hard fans I know of Marvel Comics

  • are women of color.

  • And like, they can throw down way more facts and information

  • than a lot of what people would consider

  • to be traditional fans.

  • So I do think it's great just to get to showcase the wide array

  • of Marvel fans that really are out there,

  • and kind of be like, hey, guys, this is actually something

  • that everyone can be a part of.

  • Marvel speaks to such a wide range of ages and gender.

  • Tell us why you think it's important to make

  • these stories so accessible.

  • Marvel can be very daunting to people.

  • If you haven't read every Captain America

  • run for the last 40 years, how am I going

  • to know where to even begin?

  • And so we did try to tell stories that, yes,

  • were about our characters and our legacy,

  • but not necessarily just about the comics themselves.

  • There is a larger element of storytelling

  • that goes on at Marvel.

  • And there is a larger message that, a lot of times,

  • we are trying to make sure is encapsulated in the brand

  • and in what we do.

  • And I do think that there are things that people can

  • connect with, even if comics and super heroes aren't their thing.

  • What advice do you have for future creators?

  • Be honest with who you are, and know your own truth,

  • and what you want to take from that and put into your work.

  • And eventually, you will connect with the person that

  • sees your truth the same way you do and will help you

  • get it to a larger audience.

  • Know who you are.

  • Believe in who you are.

  • And then just have the hard work ethic and the determination

  • to see that through.

  • It's been amazing having you, Sarah.

  • Thank you so much for joining us today.

  • Well, thank you, guys.

  • Thank you for having me.

  • It's always fun to get to come, and meet new people,

  • and talk about things I like.

  • Yes!

  • So please go watch "Marvel's 616"

  • and "Behind the Mask" on Disney+.

  • And now, here's what's new.

  • We have new character posters from Marvel Studios' "The

  • Falcon and the Winter Soldier," featuring Anthony

  • Mackie as Sam Wilson, aka

  • the Falcon, Sebastian Stan as Bucky Barnes, aka

  • the Winter Soldier, Daniel Bruhl as Zemo,

  • and Emily VanCamp as Sharon Carter.

  • The all new six-episode original series starts streaming

  • March 19 on Disney+.

  • JENNY: This Earth Day, take a deep dive

  • with "Secrets of the Whales," an original series from National

  • Geographic, executive producer James Cameron, and narrated

  • by Sigourney Weaver, featuring the expansive knowledge

  • and skill of acclaimed National Geographic explorer

  • and photographer Brian Skerry.

  • "Secrets of the Whales" is streaming

  • April 22 on Disney+.

  • Now we have a special treat from the cast

  • of Walt Disney Animation Studios' "Raya

  • and the Last Dragon."

  • Take a look.

  • Hi.

  • I'm Kelly Marie Tran, and I play Raya

  • in Walt Disney Animation Studios' "Raya

  • and the Last Dragon."

  • In honor of Women's History Month,

  • the woman I would like to honor is my mom.

  • She's an incredible person who left her home country to have

  • a better life and worked so hard to teach me

  • the importance of work ethic and just

  • showing up for others around you, but also for yourself.

  • Hi, I'm Gemma Chan, and I play Namaari

  • in Walt Disney Animation Studios' "Raya

  • and the Last Dragon."

  • To celebrate Women's History Month,

  • the woman I would like to honor is Kelly Marie Tran.

  • She is brilliant, talented, resilient, with so much heart.

  • And I have been so honored to work with her on this project.

  • Now we are here with the team that brought the beautiful Walt

  • Disney Animation Studios' "Raya and the Last Dragon" to life.

  • Kelsey, Gabriela, and Shweta, thank you

  • so much for being here today.

  • - Thank you for having us. - Thank you.

  • Thank you.

  • You worked on the Technical team for the movie.

  • So for those who don't know, what does the Tech team do?

  • The Technical Director team, which is the team that we're

  • currently on, is kind of the bridge between technology

  • and production.

  • It's our responsibility to make sure that we have everything

  • that we need on a technical level

  • in order to complete this movie.

  • None of the work that we do actually shows up on screen.

  • But the TDs end up touching almost

  • every shot that comes through.

  • We work very closely with the artists and with the engineers

  • to make sure that the artists have what they need.

  • It's a little bit behind the scenes,

  • but I feel like it's just as important

  • and it's also super fun.

  • There's always a technical challenge to work on every day.

  • And that's what I love about it the most.

  • It's never the same issue.

  • And it's super fun.

  • You all have been with Walt Disney Animation Studios

  • for years.

  • And you've seen the technology of Walt Disney Animation

  • Studios evolve over time.

  • So I'm curious of what were the steps

  • of evolution of technology that led

  • to "Raya and the Last Dragon."

  • I think "Raya" is really interesting because it's

  • the movie that's brought together the technology

  • that we've been working on probably

  • for about the last 10 years.

  • We have Hyperion, which is our final frame in-house renderer

  • from "Big Hero 6."

  • We also have the water from "Moana," and the advancement

  • of our fur system that we saw on "Zootopia," and our upgraded

  • volumetric and environment toolset systems

  • that we saw on "Frozen 2."

  • We're working on some really cool stuff for the future.