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  • Hello and welcome to News Review from BBC Learning English.

  • I'm Neil. Joining me is Catherinehello Catherine.

  • Hello Neil. Hello everybody.

  • Now, today's story is about an interview given on American television

  • by Prince Harry and Meghan Markle.

  • The interview contains some potentially very damaging claims

  • for the British Royal Family.

  • If you want to test yourself on any of the vocabulary you hear today,

  • you can do a quiz on our website at bbclearningenglish.com.

  • But now, let's find out some more about our story

  • from this BBC News bulletin:

  • Yes. So, the Duke and Duchess of Sussex – that's Prince Harry and Meghan Markle

  • have given an interview on American television

  • about the reasons they gave up their roles in the British Royal Family.

  • Meghan in fact said she had been under so much pressure

  • that she even considered suicide.

  • Prince Harry said his father is no longer taking his phone calls.

  • He added that they both felt they weren't given enough support

  • by the British Royal Family. Meghan also added

  • that somebody in the Royal Familyand they haven't named this person,

  • expressed concerns about the skin colour of her unborn first child.

  • OK. Well, you've been looking at this story, Catherine.

  • You've picked out three really interesting expressions and words.

  • What have you got?

  • We have: 'lays bare', 'bombshell' and 'salvo'.

  • 'Lays bare', 'bombshell' and 'salvo'.

  • So, let's have a look at your first headline please.

  • Yes, we're starting in Canada with CP24 – the headline:

  • 'Lays bare' – reveals something previously not known.

  • Yes. Now, this is a verb phrase. It's made of two words:

  • 'lays' – L-A-Y-S – and 'bare' – B-A-R-E.

  • So, you can 'lay bare somethingor you can 'lay something bare'

  • and it means to reveal something that was previously unknown

  • or hidden or possibly partially hidden.

  • If you 'lay something bareyou show everything about it.

  • Everything is available for view or scrutiny

  • and nothing is hidden or secret.

  • Yeah, it's actually quite clear from the two parts of this verb phrase:

  • 'lay' means to put something in a place, often visible place,

  • and 'bare' – 'bare' is another word for nakedso, exposed.

  • Yes, exactly. 'Expose' is a veryvery good synonym for 'lay bare'.

  • And this is an expression which is very useful, isn't it?

  • It's neither formal nor informal.

  • Yeah, you can use it really for most situations.

  • If you 'lay something bare', you just let the truth be known about it.

  • Yeah. So, for example, you could 'lay bare' the truth

  • about a relationship that's not going very well on a personal level,

  • but you could also say, for example:

  • 'The data about coronavirus laid bare the need to have a national lockdown.'

  • Good example, yeah.

  • So, it can be used theresort of, for the personal

  • and also for more, kind of, important matters.

  • Most definitely. It's a very versatile expression.

  • Let's get a summary:

  • We've just been looking at the expression 'lay bare'.

  • It contains that word 'lay', which is often confused with 'lie' –

  • but no need for further confusion, is there Catherine?

  • There is no need for that confusion. If you have any,

  • we can clear it up in just one minute when Sian will tell you

  • about the difference between the English words 'lay' and 'lie'.

  • To watch that, just click the link.

  • OK. Let's have a look at your next headline please.

  • And we're now with Sky Newshere in the UKthe headline:

  • 'Bombshell' – describesshocking event or piece of news.

  • Yes. It's all one word: B-O-M-B-S-H-E-L-L – 'bombshell'.

  • It's a military term. Neil, you know what a 'bomb' is, don't you?

  • Yes. A 'bomb' is a device that explodes in order to destroy things

  • like buildings or military hardwarethose type of things.

  • Yes. And a 'bombshell' – excuse me – is the casing around the bomb.

  • So, 'bomb' or 'bombshell'. And yes, a 'bombshell' will destroy everything:

  • it's a shocking, life-changing, momentous event.

  • Nothing will be the same after a 'bombshell'

  • and that's the idea behind the word in this context.

  • A 'bombshell interview' is something that really shocks:

  • potentially very damaging, devastating even.

  • So, 'bombshell' is something really, really serious.

  • And we're talking about figurative damage here; we're not saying

  • that Harry and Meghan actually used a weapon of any kind.

  • No, no, no. Not unless you count words as a weapon.

  • Yeah, there's no actual weaponry involved here.

  • Yeah. In this example, 'bombshell' is an adjective, so we're talking about

  • a 'bombshell interview' – we can say a 'bombshell moment'.

  • But it's also often used as a noun and with the expression 'to drop a bombshell'.

  • Yes – 'to drop a bombshell'.

  • If you 'drop a bombshell', you give very important, unexpected news.

  • So, your newsif you 'dropbombshell', you're giving shocking

  • and surprising news at the same time. So, for example,

  • if your family have always expected you maybe to go to university.

  • You've always said you're going to go to university

  • and then, the day before you're supposed to go to university,

  • you say, 'Actually, I'm not going.'

  • That would be... you would be 'dropping a bombshell'

  • or you'd be giving some 'bombshell news'.

  • Yeah and the degree to which this news is shocking is of course relative.

  • You know, it might be very important to an individual,

  • but not important on an international scale.

  • Yes, of course. Yeah, you don't have to be leaving a royal family

  • to 'drop a bombshell' – it's literally what's important to you

  • and the person that you're giving this news to.

  • OK. Well, let's get a summary:

  • If you like stories about Meghan and Harry,

  • we can go back to happier times, can't we Catherine?

  • We can. We covered the royal wedding and to find out

  • the words we used on those days, just click the link.

  • Now, for your next headline please.

  • Yes, we are now going to the Telegraphhere is the headline:

  • 'Salvo' – sudden multiple releases.

  • Yes. Now, this is another military term.

  • It's spelt S-A-L-V-O. It is a noun and often used with the verb 'to fire'.

  • If you 'fire a salvo', in military terms that means

  • a lot of weapons fire at one target at the same time.

  • So, several guns all firing at the same thing togetherthat's called a 'salvo'.

  • Now, back to the interview

  • there were lots of different things that Harry and Meghan said:

  • they said that Meghan had considered committing suicide,

  • they said that somebody was expressing concerns

  • about the skin colour of their unborn child,

  • Harry said his father was no longer taking his calls

  • and many other things.

  • So, this is not just one accusation or allegation;

  • there were lots and lots of things they said about the Royal Family.

  • So, that's why we're using the term 'salvo':

  • it means lots of damaging attacks all together.

  • Yeah. It's not always used in a negative context though.

  • For example, there could be an 'opening salvo' of a speech,

  • meaning that the opening few sentences were very attention-grabbing.

  • Yes. I mean, that's the idea of 'salvo' in that sense:

  • it's about the impactmaking a great impact

  • by making several interesting, noteworthy remarks

  • or comments in the beginning of a speech.

  • So, that's the idea of multiple things that have an impact.

  • Yeah. With the... another set expression there: an 'opening salvo'.

  • And we can also talk about a 'salvo of laughter', if we want to be really positive,

  • which means a sudden outburst of lots and lots of laughter.

  • Yesfrom lots of different people, yeah.

  • OK. Let's get a summary:

  • Time now then for a recap of our vocabulary please, Catherine.

  • Yes we had 'lays bare' – reveals something previously not known.

  • 'Bombshell' – describesshocking event or piece of news.

  • And 'salvo' – sudden multiple releases.

  • If you want to test yourself on the vocabulary,

  • check out the quiz on our website: bbclearningenglish.com.

  • And also have a look for us on social media.

  • We are all over the place, aren't we?

  • We are everywhere on social media.

  • Take it easy, take care and see you next week. Goodbye.

  • Bye.

Hello and welcome to News Review from BBC Learning English.

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Harry and Meghan interview: BBC News Review

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    林宜悉 posted on 2021/03/09
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