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  • Pig butts.

  • They're in your hot dogs, and you're eating them.

  • Or at least that's what the popular myth states- along with other questionable and hardly edible

  • body parts of various animals.

  • But what's really in your hot dog?

  • The truth may shock you, and perhaps change your mind on America's favorite baseball treat.

  • Americans eat a whopping 20 billion hot dogs every year, with many of those consumed as

  • favorite snacks at America's favorite pastime- watching men hit balls with bats and do some

  • very light cardio in between.

  • But there's one thing that even the most avid hot dog fan typically doesn't want to know,

  • and that's what goes into making these tasty tube steaks.

  • When you look at a butcher's diagram of a pig or a cow, you'll notice the copious absence

  • of any long, tube-like cuts of meat.

  • That's because much like ground meat or sausage, hot dogs are basically just the ground up

  • bits of other cuts of meat.

  • In the good old days when men were still men, and they died in horrific industrial accidents

  • at the age of 14, hot dogs included such things as dog, horse, and even sawdust.

  • But then an uppity young social justice upstart named Upton Sinclair went undercover in the

  • factories of the early 1900s and uncovered a bunch of nasty little secrets about the

  • food and manufacturing industries.

  • His immediate best seller, The Jungle, was written based on his experiences working in

  • the factories of early 1900s America, and exposed a litany of horrors brought to you

  • courtesy of the industrial revolution and completely unregulated industry.

  • Modern hot dogs have ditched the dog and sawdust, and now contain the leftover trimmings from

  • beef, pork, turkey and chicken.

  • One of the most common ingredients ismechanically separated chicken”, but despite the ominous

  • sounding name, this is just a term for cheap and efficient practice that separates chicken

  • from the bone.

  • The trade off is that human workers are much more precise, so when the machine separates

  • your future hot dog meat from a chicken bone, it doesn't really care about all the gristle,

  • fat, and tendons you normally wouldn't eat.

  • The leftover trimmings that also get thrown into the hot dog pot are typically cuts of

  • meat left over from making the more choice steak cuts that are sold in the supermarket.

  • After separating an animal carcass into its choice cuts, there's plenty of smaller leftover

  • bits that wouldn't make sense to sell on their own, so into the grinder they go.

  • Along with these perfectly legitimate pieces of meat though go more questionable cuts which

  • we're willing to bet you'd never purposefully eat on their own, such as the meat from an

  • animal's head, lots of fat, and even more bits of sinew and tendon.

  • Food companies are no fool, so they grind this mess into a very unappetizing paste,

  • mixing in the good bits of meat with the... less than good bits of meat, into a meat puree.

  • That meat paste is then cooked thoroughly so as to kill all the bacteria it contains.

  • Then that tasty meat pudding is sent to a chopping chamber where it is finely chopped,

  • resulting in what's called an emulsion.

  • That finely chopped mess is once more put through a grinder, and finally through a sieve

  • to give it a more ground-beef type of feel.

  • At this point, every manufacturer adds different ingredients to its hot dog recipe.

  • Most however will include potassium lactate, a preservative which helps inhibit mold and

  • fungus growth.

  • The last thing you'd want is to bite into a delicious hot dog and get a mouthful of

  • mold.

  • Sodium Diacetate is also included in most ingredients list, because factory farming

  • is a literal hell hole of misery, cruelty, and other things you care more about like

  • germs and pathogens.

  • Rather than transition to a healthier, if slightly more expensive, method of farming,

  • sodium diacetate is dumped into the hot dog mixture to help kill deadly germs.

  • Hot dog meat, just like any other meat, quickly loses its appealing pink luster that lets

  • you know it's fresh and delicious- even when it's most definitely not fresh, and questionably

  • delicious.

  • That's where Sodium Nitrite comes to the rescue.

  • This additive helps hot dogs and other processed food products keep their delicious pink coloring

  • for longer, so that you don't think twice about buying that 7-11 hot dog that's definitely

  • been on that roller thingy for at least a month and a half now.

  • Sodium Phosphate pulls double duty in hot dog meat.

  • For a long time it was used to treat constipation and upset stomachs, but in processed meats

  • it's used to keep that meat nice and moist.

  • Nothing looks unhealthier than dry meat, and aesthetics are very important for consumers.

  • Unlike other chemical additives on our list though, at least sodium phosphate is already

  • working to help your inevitable constipation and upset stomach after eating a bunch of

  • hot dogs.

  • Everything else is pretty much just giving you cancer.

  • Along with chemicals, each hot dog brand has its own recipe for flavor.

  • This is also the stage where things like salt, sugar, and other spices are mixed into the

  • meat paste, giving the future hot dogs a distinctive, and branded flavoring.

  • Now that the hot dog meat is full of chemical additives and spices, the whole thing gets

  • another thorough mixing and then is pumped into plastic casings, which gives them their

  • tube shape.

  • The hot dogs, which finally look like proper 'dawgs, are then put into a giant cooker in

  • 180 degree water for about 30 minutes.

  • After this very warm bath, the hot dogs are dumped into ice cold water in order to prevent

  • shriveling, then have their plastic cases removed and are packaged for your consumption.

  • Hot dogs are definitely a better food option than they were 120 years ago, but if you'd

  • like to eat more, well actual meat, and less 'filler', look for packaging that says things

  • likeall beeforall pork”, and avoid labeling that saysmeat by-products

  • orvariety meats”.

  • 'Organic' is just a buzzword cooked up to sell you overpriced crap, so instead of relying

  • on labels do some research ahead of time on brands and their manufacturing processes,

  • because organic doesn't mean you aren't going to be eating a questionable hodge-podge of

  • animal bits and pieces.

  • At least though you can rest easy knowing that human meat is likely not part of the

  • recipe.

  • In 2015 food tests on popular hot dog brands showed that 2 percent of their samples contained

  • human DNA, but this was likely just hairs and fingernails accidentally dropped into

  • the hot dog batch by careless workers.

  • Not exactly comforting, but eating someone's ground-up fingernails is probably less gross

  • than eating their entire ground-up body.

  • Now that you're turned off hot dogs forever, check out our Challenge: I Ate Only Fast Food

  • For 30 Days.

  • Or click this other video instead!

Pig butts.

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B1 meat hot dog sodium eating delicious questionable

What's Actually Inside a Hot Dog

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    林宜悉 posted on 2021/03/05
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