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  • Ah, yeah.

  • Today I'm going to share my favorite tips to learn languages with music.

  • This topic is definitely my jam, and I have lots of experience with it.

  • Songs are one of my favorite language learning tools.

  • As you will see in this lesson, they can be a fun and playful way to learn English.

  • So if you watch until the end, you will get four fun tips and activities that you can do with songs that will help you to make sense of grammatical structures, to expand your vocabulary and even improve your pronunciation and, of course, to increase your fluency.

  • So turn the volume up and let's do this.

  • And by the way, if you are new here every week, we help you to understand fast speaking natives without getting lost without missing the jokes and without subtitles.

  • Just like Daniel, whose understanding is getting better.

  • Lesson by lesson.

  • We're going to take your comprehension to the next level to just hit that subscribe button and the button below, and you won't miss a single one of our new lessons.

  • Yeah, so first off, they can help you to make sense of grammar.

  • You don't need to depend only on books to learn grammatical rules.

  • Songs can also be a fun way to learn or review grammar.

  • It helps you to learn the congregations and master verb tenses as they are often repeated over and over again in different songs.

  • Also, they are a great way to recall the grammar that you have already learned.

  • You can spot a certain conditional sentence or a relative clause, for example, so here's one activity to use a song to help you with your grammar.

  • So first off you're going to choose a song that are already quite familiar with and a verb tense that you feel like you need to master.

  • So, for example, you might choose the simple past or the participle form.

  • Then you will get the lyrics of your chosen song and identify all the verbs.

  • I might even highlight them with a certain color.

  • For example, this step alone is already a great exercise, but let's take it a step further.

  • So now change all of them to the simple past.

  • At this moment you're practicing, repeating the form, so don't mind if the lyrics turn out to be a little bit strange.

  • Alternate between singing the song with the original verbs and the change verbs.

  • A couple of times you'll see that it will help you to remember them much more easily, and you can do the very same activity with pretty much any word family.

  • And you can even change adjectives to adverbs or add prefixes or suffixes to announce play with the opposites of adjectives and so on.

  • This might even get you laughing as you'll get a pretty silly new version of the song.

  • The music is really great for expanding your vocabulary.

  • Music is a really powerful workout for your brain as it activates both sides at the same time, helping increase learning and memory.

  • Take, for example, that it's mainly through songs that kids learn their first pieces of vocabulary.

  • Just think about it.

  • They BC's parts of the body colours actions.

  • There are songs for all of these that we learn at an early age.

  • Songs will help you expand your vocabulary to It's not for nothing that Bob Dylan, a musician when the Nobel Prize in literature for poetic expressions through music, one of them many good things about learning new words with songs is the fact that they are presented in context, so you don't learn isolated items, but rather a particular meaning of a word.

  • Moreover, oftentimes you won't even need to look up the word in the dictionary, and we'll be able to understand it because of the context.

  • The words that come before or even the overall tone of the song develop a habit of adding the words you learn to your lexical book or vocabulary apps like donkey quisling or memorize and were visiting them from time to time.

  • Also, remember to put them into use as soon as you learn them whenever possible.

  • So great exercise for you to start doing this right now is training with the lyrics.

  • One type of lyrics.

  • Training is an exercise in which you need to fill in the blanks of a song, so there are two ways to go about it.

  • First, by using the app or website called lyrics training or finding song activities on cool english dot net.

  • In these websites, the words you'll need to identify and remember already chosen for you, although you can choose the level of difficulty, whether easy, medium or hard.

  • So it's great whether you're a beginner or more advanced.

  • What's more, it's a good way to practice both listening and vocabulary at the same time.

  • The other way is to use the principle of lyrics training to help you learn through space repetition, which is a way of learning, in which you take the information that you need to memorize and repeat it across increasing intervals.

  • You get the lyrics of the song choose words that are new to you, or that you have a hard time remembering, and then you take them out of the song anytime that they appear.

  • After that, you play the song and try to listen and complete it with those words.

  • After a while, you may increase the challenge and try to remember the words before listening.

  • This song.

  • This is a great way to train your ability to recall words, adding them to your active vocabulary.

  • Plus, it's such a fun challenge.

  • The key here is to do that at intervals just like you would with an app like monkey or memorize.

  • So, for example, you do it first once every day than every two days.

  • Then once a week that way, you're forced to remember those words from time to time and will be much more unlikely that you will forget them.

  • Once you've done this with a few songs, you can just change the song you work with on each day and will only take you a few minutes.

  • And I have a question.

  • Do you usually get frustrated when you can't think of the right word?

  • If you're like most learners, I'm sure you have emphatically said yes.

  • Well, I have two suggestions for you.

  • First check out our free master class.

  • In it you will learn the three keys to being able to understand natives at any speed.

  • First is vocabulary.

  • You will learn the vocabulary that we need is really use in our everyday speech.

  • And we will help you to never forget it.

  • Second is pronunciation.

  • You will understand and even be able to imitate how we cut and connect our words.

  • Third is cultural context.

  • So you will be able to laugh along with all the jokes.

  • But you will not find this master class on YouTube To get exclusive access, you need to click up here or in the description below to sign up for free.

  • See you there and The second suggestion is to check out this lesson that Andrea made on our other channel about how to think in English.

  • You will also find a link to that in the description, and it's a great lesson to watch next.

  • When it comes down to it, language is music.

  • Every language has its own rhythm, so if you speak English with the rhythm of your native language, it can take you sound a little bit unnatural.

  • Songs tend to exaggerate the rhythm of the language so they can be a great tool to help you to practice speaking English with the correct rhythm and flow, while stressing words correctly.

  • Of course, because of the melody in some songs, there might be a slight change in the pronunciation.

  • This is, however, the exception, so it should not scare you away from learning with songs.

  • Most of the time.

  • Words that rhyme fall on the same beat or pulse of the song, and this certainly helps you to identify patterns on how to pronounce such words.

  • It is also helpful for you to learn how to actually pronounce a word.

  • Sometimes we learn words by reading, and we don't know how to pronounce them.

  • Or even worse, we get bad habits of pronouncing them incorrectly.

  • Songs will help you with that in a natural and enjoyable way.

  • Another thing.

  • That songs are enriched with its connected speech, and they will help you to notice which words are commonly reduced and linked together.

  • One of the benefits of using songs to study is accent reduction.

  • Have you ever noticed how singers with a very strong British accent like Adele or at Sharon sound kind of American when they sing?

  • This happens because accents are distinguished based on the use of intonation, Bao ling articulation and so on.

  • However, when a person sings, these aspects are neutralized as the air flows and the articulation and length of syllables and sounds tend to become less precise.

  • What's more, the muscles being articulated to project the voice of a particular genre?

  • Let's say pop music tend to share the same features of a neutral American accent, so so you can sort of take your mouth to the gym because it uses all the parts of your body to produce sound and helps you exaggerate the difficult phone names in English that don't exist in your native tongue.

  • A good exercise to practice pronunciation inspired by the mimic method, is to first try to imitate the sounds you hear in the song without caring about the lyrics.

  • Just a random invented words, also known as gibberish in the same rhythm and melody of the song.

  • If possible, identify when a word is emphasized.

  • When a sound rises and how many sounds there are in a sentence, this will help warm up the muscles.

  • So when you actually pronounce the real words of the lyrics, they fall into place more comfortably.

  • So if you still aren't convinced about the benefits of songs for learning English, let me give you a final reason.

  • Music is bound to help your fluency.

  • In general.

  • As I mentioned, music has been one of my number one language learning tools and most of the six languages I have learned.

  • I created playlists in Spotify for each language.

  • I might listen to my French playlist while cooking or Catalan playlist.

  • While working by singing along, I noticed huge differences in my naturalness of my speech when I got into conversations.

  • Why is this?

  • Well, first, because music affects our mood and you can help to create a better atmosphere for learning.

  • It might sound silly, but having the right mindset does wonders for our motivation, which sounds better to you, studying lyrics or studying grammar books.

  • Second, when we like a song, we tend to stick with it for a while.

  • Listening to it on repeat nonstop repetition, even from a passive perspective, is an extremely effective way of increasing memorization.

  • You can use melodies that you already know or that are stuck in your head and change the lyrics.

  • Invent your own story for the song.

  • Invent the meaning of everything that's being said.

  • You can create movements to words in the song, but the most important thing is to sing along.

  • Enjoy the moment.

  • Sing out loud, being in your car on the way to work in the shower or my favorite while cooking dinner.

  • If you want to take it to the next level, try this.

  • Download a program like audacity, which is free to edit audio.

  • Cut the song into small pieces, even just a few seconds.

  • Choose, especially the parts that you find most challenging to imitate.

  • Listen to these bits over and over again.

  • Once you feel comfortable identifying what's being said.

  • Sing those small bits.

  • Think of it like reps with a dumb bell that you would use to make your arms stronger.

  • But for your muscles of articulation, if this is difficult, you can also start by slowing down the audio.

  • Then, once you get more comfortable, speed it up.

  • This will help you speak English faster.

  • If you want a good challenge, check out how we broke down Eminem song.

  • Lose yourself in this lesson by trying this exercise and others that we've mentioned today.

  • Before you know it, you're going to be speaking English clearly and naturally.

  • Ah, yeah.

  • Wow.

  • So to wrap up this lesson, I have some lightning recommendations for you.

  • They'll make all of this much more fun and easier.

  • So first off, start with songs that you like, but that are suitable for learning.

  • And for your level.

  • Don't choose a song just because the teacher told you that it's a good one.

  • If you don't like it, otherwise you will not be motivated, and you'll probably give up if you need some help finding a song.

  • A great place to start is with our playlist of lessons with songs you can find navigating up here or also down in the description below and make sure you have access to the lyrics.

  • I really like genius lyrics because you can also see information about what the song is about, and sometimes this can help you to understand the cultural context of them as a bonus.

  • Print them out, take notes, mark them up, use colors.

  • Be creative.

  • You can mix active listening activities like the exercise we mentioned with passive listening that is listening for pleasure.

  • As Confucius once said, music produces a kind of pleasure which human nature cannot do without.

  • So that said and joint to the fullest and always be learning.

  • Now it's time to go beyond the classroom and live here.

  • English.

  • Ah, yeah, What's up, everyone?

  • Can you understand TV shows and movies with subtitles in English, but find it difficult to understand them when you turn off the subtitles.

  • Don't worry, you're not alone.

  • Lots of people get stuck at this stage.

  • The vocabulary allows them to understand media through reading subtitles, but they're listening.

  • Skills aren't quite there yet.

Ah, yeah.

Subtitles and vocabulary

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B1 vocabulary learning music language lesson exercise

How to Learn English with Songs | Speak Clearly and Confidently

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    林宜悉 posted on 2021/03/04
Video vocabulary