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  • Hello. It's News Review from BBC Learning English.

  • I'm Neil. Joining me is Tomhello Tom.

  • Hi Neil and hello to our audience.

  • Today's story is about Sunday's Golden Globes ceremony.

  • OK. If you want to test yourself on any vocabulary you hear in our programme,

  • you can find a quiz on our website: bbclearningenglish.com.

  • Let's hear some more about Tom's story from this BBC News report:

  • The Golden Globes ceremonyor the Golden Globes awards,

  • happened on Sunday evening.

  • The awards celebrate the best in TV and cinema.

  • British actors and talent took home several awards

  • and this year the award ceremony was virtual.

  • OK. Well, you've been looking at this story;

  • you've picked out three really good expressions and phrases

  • that we can use to talk about it. What have you got?

  • Our vocabulary today, Neil, is: 'red carpet', 'channelled' and 'posthumously'.

  • 'Red carpet', 'channelled' and 'posthumously'.

  • Let's start then with your first headline, with that word 'red carpet'.

  • My first headline is from right here at the BBCit says:  

  • 'Red carpet' – a red-coloured carpet used for important guests on special occasions.

  • Now Tom, why are we talking about 'red carpet'?

  • Everybody knows what a 'red carpet' is!

  • It's perhaps a bit basic for News Review, isn't it? A 'red carpet'.

  • No. Red... 'red carpet' is a noun – noun phraseand it has two meanings.

  • Number one is the literal meaning and it means the 'red carpet'

  • that you would normally see at an award ceremony,

  • where the movie stars walk into the building.

  • But we can also use the figurative meaning, which means special treatment.

  • That's right, yes. So, for example, I visited some friends,

  • before lockdown, in a foreign country – I hadn't seen for a long time

  • and they really gave me and my family the 'red-carpet treatment'.

  • Now, that doesn't mean that they bought a red carpet

  • and put it outside their house for us to walk on, does it?

  • No, it means they gave you special treatment.

  • So, actually if we think of 'red carpet' as meaning special treatment,

  • we could look at the headline, which says:

  • 'Golden Globes stars shine without...' special treatment of an Oscars ceremony.

  • You know, they did a very good job without all the normal fuss

  • that goes at something like the Golden Globes.

  • There are a couple of fixed expressions. You mentioned one, Neil.

  • First, I'm going to give 'roll out the red carpet'. Have you heard this one?

  • I have, yeah. That's similar meaning to the one that I mentioned earlier.

  • Yeah, if someone 'rolls out the red carpet', they make you very welcome

  • and they give you kind oflike, a superstar's treatment

  • or they 'give you the red-carpet treatment'. This was the one you gave, Neil.

  • I gave this second because 'treatment' is a noun,

  • so we need to use 'red-carpetas an adjective structure.

  • So, it must be hyphenated: 'red-carpet treatment'.

  • Absolutely. OK. Let's get a summary of that:

  • Well, that was a story about the Golden Globes.

  • The connection to the video that we think you should watch

  • is the word 'global'. We have one about global warming.

  • Where can our audience find it, Tom?

  • They can find it by clicking the link.

  • Time now to have a look at your second headline.

  • My second headline, Neil, is from InStyle,

  • which is a website from the USAit says:

  • 'Channelled' – carried the spirit of a person or idea.

  • Yeah. So, 'channelled' here is a past simple verb of 'channel'.

  • You notice in the headline it's spelt with one 'L'.

  • This is an American websitethis is the American spelling.

  • In British English we use two 'L's. Both are acceptable

  • and this word 'channel' has many meanings.

  • It does. Now, this word 'channel', as you mentioned, has many meanings.

  • It's probably really familiar to people with reference

  • to 'YouTube channels', 'radio channels', 'TV channels',

  • and also bodies of water like 'the English Channel'.

  • So, what's the connection?

  • The connection, Neil, when you talk about the noun example

  • so 'TV channel', bodies of water – is the connections flow, OK.

  • It's sort of.... they describe, almost, movement.

  • You know, a 'TV channel' will direct information towards the viewer.

  • A 'channel' between two seaslike the English Channel,

  • will direct ships that want to travel between it.

  • So, you get this idea of flow or, kind of, directing things.

  • So, tell us about this word as a verb.

  • So, as a verb 'channel' can mean to direct or to allow to flow.

  • Now, if we 'channel a spirit' of someone,

  • we kind of allow their spirit to flow through us.

  • I'm trying to think of a good example.

  • Neil, can you give me one, please?

  • Oh yeah, I've got a great example, Tom.

  • People may have noticed, behind me here,

  • this electric guitar hanging on the wall.

  • Now, when I... when I'm not sitting here presenting News Review,

  • sometimes I use this room as a kind of music room

  • and I try and 'channelthe spirit of Jimi Hendrix.

  • So, what I mean is I imagine Hendrix and his music and I imagine

  • what it would be like for it to flow through me, down my arms...

  • You let that energy kind of flow through you, right?

  • ...into my fingers andtry almost to become him...

  • ...really unsuccessfully, I must say!

  • So, next week on News Review,

  • Neil will 'channel' the spirit of Jimi Hendrix:

  • he will play guitar with his teeth...!

  • Fantastic idea. I thinkTom, it's time for a summary:

  • Talking about 'channeling spirits',

  • we have an expression with ghosts

  • in a programme we think you would like to watch.

  • What... where can our audience find it please, Tom?

  • They can find it by clicking the link.

  • OK. Let's have your next headline.

  • My next headline is from Entertainment Weekly,

  • another source from the USAit says:

  • And that word is 'posthumously'.

  • 'Posthumously' – after death.

  • Now, this is a funny word, isn't it?

  • Because it doesn't sound like it looks for a start.

  • At the beginning we have the word 'post'

  • and then we have what looks like 'humous',

  • but we don't say 'post-humous', we say 'posthumous'.

  • Yeah. It's got a funny pronunciationThe emphasis is on the first syllable

  • and it's – as you sayit's not 'post', it's 'post-'.

  • It's 'posthumous' and the 'h' is silent.

  • Yeah and don't... 'Posthumously'.

  • Don't be confused by that 'T-H' combination.

  • It's not a '-th-'. It's a 'posthumously'.

  • So, can you give us examples of other words

  • that start with that prefix 'post-' or 'post-'.

  • 'Post-' or 'post-', yeahyou could have 'postgraduate'.

  • So, if you do a 'postgraduate degree', you do a degree after you graduated

  • from your first degreeit's a second one.

  • Also if you write 'PS' onletter for extra information,

  • that means 'postscript'.

  • So, it comes after the text, or the script, that you've just finished.

  • Yeah. Now, going back to 'posthumously' and 'posthumous',

  • it's a pretty formal-sounding expression, isn't it?

  • But, at the same time, it is often used

  • because it's an efficient way of saying 'after someone died'.

  • Exactly, yeah. It's not only an efficient way of saying 'after somebody died'

  • or 'after this person's death', it's also quite respectful as well.

  • So, for example, another word that uses this same tone is 'late'.

  • If you refer to a 'late actor', you mean an actor, which is dead.

  • But this is a way that we can refer to it without being as direct

  • and by being more respectful.

  • Yeah and we also see this word not as an adverb but as an adjective.

  • So, for example, you might hear about a singer or a group

  • no... well, a singer, who has a 'posthumous hit'.

  • A 'posthumous hit', yeah. Often, in the same context as award ceremonies,

  • we can use it for things that people sort of achieve after they die.

  • For example, very brave soldiers that die in a battle:

  • they might get a 'posthumous medal' –

  • so, a medal that's given to them after they die.

  • And it's also used in legal terms to refer to somebody being pardoned.

  • So, you might hear about a 'posthumous pardon':

  • it's decided that somebody didn't commit the crime

  • that they were punished for – unfortunately they have died

  • and then they have their name cleared afterwards.

  • Exactly. So, it can be an adverb, 'posthumously',

  • or it can be an adjective, 'posthumous', and mind that pronunciation.

  • OK. Let's get a summary.

  • OK. Tom, time now for a recap of the vocabulary please.

  • Today's vocabulary, Neil: we had 'red carpet' – a red-coloured carpet,

  • used for important guests and special occasions.

  • We have 'channelled' – carried the spirit of a person or idea.

  • And 'posthumously', which means after death.

  • If you want to test yourself on the vocabulary,

  • take a quiz on our website bbclearningenglish.com.

  • You can also find us all over social media.

  • Thanks for joining us and see you next time.

  • See you next time.

  • Goodbye. Bye bye.

Hello. It's News Review from BBC Learning English.

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Golden Globe 2021 - News Review

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    林宜悉 posted on 2021/03/02
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