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  • Lorraine Kearney: One of the biggest myths that I get

  • from my clients is that

  • I need to skip meals and starve in order to lose weight.

  • It's not true.

  • So, if you skip meals,

  • it's gonna have such a negative effect on your body

  • that when you do go to sit down and eat,

  • you'll probably overconsume.

  • Narrator: That's Lorraine Kearney,

  • one of three dietitians we brought into our studios.

  • My name is Ryan Turner.

  • My name is Nikita Kapur.

  • Narrator: To debunk 18 of the most common

  • weight-loss myths.

  • Kearney: The biggest myth that frustrates me the most

  • is that all calories are created equally.

  • A calorie is not just a calorie.

  • It depends on the source of your calories,

  • whether it's coming from caloric-dense foods

  • or nutritional-dense foods.

  • Caloric-dense foods would be more so

  • our cookies, our cakes.

  • We can have a cookie that's 100 calories,

  • we'll eat it, it'll digest really fast,

  • then it's gonna spike our blood sugar levels

  • where, when we start to crash again,

  • we're gonna crave more sugar

  • for that energy pick-me-up.

  • Narrator: And that can make you gain weight.

  • Kearney: On the other hand, you can have a banana.

  • Narrator: Which is an example

  • of a nutritionally dense food.

  • Kearney: I get the question a lot,

  • do bananas make you fat?

  • Bananas do not make you fat.

  • Bananas, they're a great source of potassium,

  • but for those 100 calories

  • you're also gonna get the fiber and the nutrients

  • that your body needs in that cellular level

  • to make sure that you are healthy

  • and that you're nourished.

  • Narrator: And you definitely need to nourish your body

  • if you're trying to lose weight.

  • Kapur: When we are restricting calories,

  • you are restricting the energy source of your body.

  • You're also restricting the energy source of your brain.

  • And if that's happening,

  • then, you know, very primitive,

  • protective mechanisms

  • start to kick into place

  • where your body senses that as

  • a physiological threat

  • and does start to shift your metabolic balance

  • to burn less because it's getting less.

  • It's kinda like a budget. Right?

  • So, if you have a paycheck

  • and you're running out of funds,

  • you're going to conserve how much you pay

  • till your next paycheck.

  • Your body does the same.

  • Your body will jump into this protective

  • physiological, biological mechanism

  • to reduce the amount of energy you're using,

  • which is why it is hard for people to maintain weight.

  • Narrator: And starving yourself

  • can also shrink your muscles.

  • Turner: You wanna make sure that

  • you're not eating less

  • than 70% of your overall calorie needs.

  • If you do, that's where not only

  • are you probably gonna feel extremely hungry

  • and it's gonna take you off

  • of any goals that you're setting,

  • but you're probably gonna start compromising

  • your muscle mass as well,

  • and that's where weight loss is gonna be unhealthy.

  • Narrator: But while the amount of calories

  • you consume matters,

  • the timing might not.

  • Turner: Timing your meals is always a big question.

  • Everyone comes to me and they kinda smirk

  • and they think that I'm gonna give them a thumbs up

  • when they say, "I don't eat

  • after 6 o'clock or 7 o'clock."

  • And I say, "Oh, all right, do you enjoy that?"

  • And they say, "No."

  • And I say, "Well then maybe eating after is OK."

  • Because timing of day

  • is not going to affect weight loss.

  • Calories are what's going to affect

  • weight loss or body-fat loss.

  • So, if you eat a bunch of additional calories

  • and you're in calorie surplus

  • and those are coming late at night,

  • then that's what's causing something like weight gain.

  • Narrator: And what about eating

  • first thing in the morning?

  • Kearney: It depends on the body, and it depends on

  • the person and their relationship with food.

  • For a lot of people, me included,

  • if I don't eat a meal, I usually feel very deprived,

  • and it's like I want to make up for it later.

  • If that happens,

  • then that's when we can add in a lot of calories.

  • Personally, I'm a huge advocate of breakfast.

  • Our body runs on fuel, and food is our fuel.

  • So if we have our breakfast,

  • then we feel we have more sustained energy

  • throughout the day.

  • Narrator: And if you do choose to eat breakfast,

  • feel free to go for that 2% yogurt.

  • Turner: Now, fat is incredibly necessary.

  • We should not be afraid of fat.

  • We need fat in the diet.

  • Fat's gonna be necessary for things

  • like absorbing nutrients, like the fat-soluble nutrients

  • like vitamin A and D and E and K.

  • And you also need to make sure that fat,

  • specifically cholesterol,

  • is what's gonna help produce things like your hormones,

  • so things like estrogen and

  • testosterone, growth hormones,

  • so we need all those kind of things.

  • Narrator: Not only is fat healthy,

  • but fat-free foods are often loaded with sugar or salt.

  • Kearney: So, if you have a wholesome product

  • and you're removing the fat of it,

  • it's gonna taste completely different.

  • You probably wouldn't even like it.

  • But what they're gonna do is replace that flavor

  • with something else,

  • and usually it's either sodium or sugar.

  • So, with sugar,

  • when we have, like, a yogurt

  • that has the fruit at the bottom,

  • they're gonna have way more sugars

  • than if you had, like, a 2% Greek yogurt.

  • Narrator: And, as it turns out,

  • fat isn't the only nutrient you can keep in your diet

  • and still lose weight.

  • Kearney: One of the biggest myths I get about carbs

  • is that you must omit them from your diet to lose weight,

  • or my body doesn't digest them

  • well and I have to omit them

  • because I'd never lose weight

  • unless I restrict myself.

  • It's not true.

  • Narrator: And it's just not sustainable.

  • Kearney: It's almost impossible to have

  • a no-carb diet.

  • Fruits and vegetables are known as carbohydrates,

  • and we must get those for their nutrients.

  • Why carbs have a bad name?

  • It's because of the simple carbs.

  • The carbs that you see prepackaged

  • that are the cookies,

  • the cakes, the sodas, the potato chips.

  • They're called simple carbs

  • because the chemical structure of them

  • is usually one to two glucose molecules put together.

  • So, when you have, like, a small glucose molecule,

  • it's easy for them to break away.

  • But with our complex carbs,

  • they are really long chains of carbon

  • that usually are about 18-carbon long,

  • and then, by the time that your body

  • starts to break it down,

  • it's gonna take a while, and that's exactly what we want

  • because it helps balance our blood sugar

  • and also that fiber keeps us full for longer

  • and then also prevents us from snacking.

  • So, eat your carbs.

  • Definitely eat your carbs and eat your bread.

  • Bread's delicious; it's one of my favorite things.

  • Narrator: And she has a pro tip

  • for finding bread with more complex carbs.

  • Kearney: Read your ingredient list.

  • With bread, a lot of those mass-produced breads

  • that are in the bread aisle that are shelf-stable,

  • they can last a month

  • without getting mold on them.

  • And when you look at the ingredient list,

  • it's probably about 50 ingredients long.

  • They're the ones we wanna avoid.

  • When you're getting bread,

  • get the fresh bread that comes from the local bakery,

  • which is usually around the deli counter area

  • inside of grocery stores.

  • Those will have maybe four or five ingredients,

  • it'll mold after two days,

  • but you can preserve it

  • by just putting it into the freezer

  • and take it out as you need it.

  • Narrator: And, speaking of bread,

  • what about going gluten-free to lose weight?

  • Kearney: Gluten-free for weight loss

  • can be a huge marketing ploy.

  • So, with gluten-free, there are a lot of people

  • that do have an intolerance to gluten.

  • Or they have celiac disease,

  • which is where the body starts attacking itself

  • and can deteriorate the body.

  • Narrator: But there are also people

  • without these conditions who are looking to...

  • Kearney: Blame something like the gluten

  • without checking the rest of their diet.

  • If you are honest with yourself,

  • recording your food, checking the ingredients,

  • and then you eat the gluten

  • and you feel the intolerance, then great.

  • But a lot of people will choose to just jump in

  • and be like, gluten's the enemy.

  • Narrator: So, most of us don't need to cut out gluten

  • or fat or carbs to lose weight.

  • But there are some products better left on the shelf.

  • Kearney: The diet sodas are terrible,

  • with all the additives, preservatives in them,

  • and the hidden sugars.

  • A lot of the added sugars are the synthetic sugars

  • that are supposed to be great

  • because they don't release insulin,

  • which then doesn't cause a spike in blood sugar levels.

  • But, internally,

  • if we don't stimulate the release of insulin,

  • those sugars, the synthetic sugars, go to the liver,

  • build up around the liver,

  • hinder the functioning of the liver,

  • and then can lead to nonalcoholic fatty disease.

  • If I'm gonna have a soda,

  • which I have once in a blue moon,

  • it will be the real thing.

  • Yes, there's more sugar in it,

  • but it's something that I don't have on a regular basis.

  • Narrator: Better yet, she says, drink water.

  • Kearney: Jazz up your water.

  • Add fruit to it, add some mint or cucumber, lemon.

  • Yes, it'll take a little bit for your taste buds to reset,

  • but you're getting so many nutrients from that water,

  • and your body requires water

  • for it to function optimally.

  • Water is one of the six nutrients

  • that the body needs.

  • And when we're dehydrated,

  • it also mimics the signs of hunger.

  • So people turn to food a lot if they're dehydrated,

  • not realizing that they're not hungry,

  • it's just your body saying,

  • "Give me some water, I'm thirsty."

  • Narrator: And what about juice?

  • Kearney: Oh, juice cleanses. [laughs]

  • So, juice cleanses are, like, one of my pet peeves.

  • If you're having a juice every once in a while, great.