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  • What's in the box?

  • Whatever it is must be pretty important,

  • because I've traveled with it, moved it,

  • from apartment to apartment to apartment.

  • (Laughter)

  • (Applause)

  • Sound familiar?

  • Did you know that we Americans

  • have about three times the amount of space

  • we did 50 years ago?

  • Three times.

  • So you'd think, with all this extra space,

  • we'd have plenty of room for all our stuff.

  • Nope.

  • There's a new industry in town,

  • a 22 billion-dollar, 2.2 billion sq. ft. industry:

  • that of personal storage.

  • So we've got triple the space,

  • but we've become such good shoppers

  • that we need even more space.

  • So where does this lead?

  • Lots of credit card debt,

  • huge environmental footprints,

  • and perhaps not coincidentally,

  • our happiness levels flat-lined over the same 50 years.

  • Well I'm here to suggest there's a better way,

  • that less might actually equal more.

  • I bet most of us have experienced at some point

  • the joys of less:

  • college -- in your dorm,

  • traveling -- in a hotel room,

  • camping -- rig up basically nothing,

  • maybe a boat.

  • Whatever it was for you, I bet that, among other things,

  • this gave you a little more freedom,

  • a little more time.

  • So I'm going to suggest

  • that less stuff and less space

  • are going to equal a smaller footprint.

  • It's actually a great way to save you some money.

  • And it's going to give you a little more ease in your life.

  • So I started a project called Life Edited at lifeedited.org

  • to further this conversation

  • and to find some great solutions in this area.

  • First up: crowd-sourcing my 420 sq. ft. apartment in Manhattan

  • with partners Mutopo and Jovoto.com.

  • I wanted it all --

  • home office, sit down dinner for 10,

  • room for guests,

  • and all my kite surfing gear.

  • With over 300 entries from around the world,

  • I got it, my own little jewel box.

  • By buying a space that was 420 sq. ft.

  • instead of 600,

  • immediately I'm saving 200 grand.

  • Smaller space is going to make for smaller utilities --

  • save some more money there,

  • but also a smaller footprint.

  • And because it's really designed

  • around an edited set of possessions -- my favorite stuff --

  • and really designed for me,

  • I'm really excited to be there.

  • So how can you live little?

  • Three main approaches.

  • First of all, you have to edit ruthlessly.

  • We've got to clear the arteries of our lives.

  • And that shirt that I hadn't worn in years?

  • It's time for me to let it go.

  • We've got to cut the extraneous out of our lives,

  • and we've got to learn to stem the inflow.

  • We need to think before we buy.

  • Ask ourselves,

  • "Is that really going to make me happier? Truly?"

  • By all means,

  • we should buy and own some great stuff.

  • But we want stuff that we're going to love for years,

  • not just stuff.

  • Secondly, our new mantra:

  • small is sexy.

  • We want space efficiency.

  • We want things that are designed

  • for how they're used the vast majority of the time,

  • not that rare event.

  • Why have a six burner stove

  • when you rarely use three?

  • So we want things that nest,

  • we want things that stack, and we want it digitized.

  • You can take paperwork,

  • books, movies,

  • and you can make it disappear -- it's magic.

  • Finally, we want multifunctional spaces and housewares --

  • a sink combined with a toilet,

  • a dining table becomes a bed --

  • same space,

  • a little side table

  • stretches out to seat 10.

  • In the winning Life Edited scheme in a render here,

  • we combine a moving wall with transformer furniture

  • to get a lot out of the space.

  • Look at the coffee table --

  • it grows in height and width

  • to seat 10.

  • My office folds away,

  • easily hidden.

  • My bed just pops out of the wall with two fingers.

  • Guests? Move the moving wall,

  • have some fold-down guest beds.

  • And of course, my own movie theater.

  • So I'm not saying that we all need to live

  • in 420 sq. ft.

  • But consider the benefits of an edited life.

  • Go from 3,000 to 2,000,

  • from 1,500 to 1,000.

  • Most of us, maybe all of us,

  • are here pretty happily for a bunch of days

  • with a couple of bags,

  • maybe a small space, a hotel room.

  • So when you go home and you walk through your front door,

  • take a second and ask yourselves,

  • "Could I do with a little life editing?

  • Would that give me a little more freedom?

  • Maybe a little more time?"

  • What's in the box?

  • It doesn't really matter.

  • I know I don't need it.

  • What's in yours?

  • Maybe, just maybe,

  • less might equal more.

  • So let's make room

  • for the good stuff.

  • Thank you.

  • (Applause)

What's in the box?

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A2 US TED space edited stuff apartment smaller

【TED】Graham Hill: Less stuff, more happiness (Less stuff, more happiness | Graham Hill)

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    Amber Chang posted on 2014/07/20
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