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  • now.

  • It's been three weeks since the military staged a coup in Myanmar on ousted the country's leader, Aung San Suu, Ky.

  • And have a look at the protests in the country today.

  • Demonstrators have held their biggest protest today these pictures from Yangon, where it's estimated hundreds of thousands of people took part.

  • And that's in defiance of a clear threat from the military, which said protesters will suffer the loss of life if they continue.

  • Well, here's more from BBC Burmese reporter named Chan A in Yangon Despite the threat off being shot or getting arrested, there is no sign off becoming this intense and even drawing more people out there, including many civil servants.

  • Yes, you see, protests show they are sheer grit and determination to take down the regime.

  • There is, however, raising key question whether that gender would Jews existed force again against those who refused to live or work under the military regime.

  • Well, as we heard there, the military has bean relatively restrained in yang gone, but there have been protests all over the country and in some smaller cities.

  • There reportedly bean hundreds of arrests.

  • Have a look at some of the other protests from me.

  • Akina in the northern state of catch in tow.

  • Lashio in Shan State, the ancient town of Bergen on Tongi to the southern town of Dawei.

  • On in the capital, while you can see the army blocking this huge road, so protesters crowded onto smaller streets, walking and chanting, demanding that the military hand back power.

  • Well, there were lots of important numbers today.

  • Here's the BBC's Katie Silver on how many demonstrators have bean out why these gatherings of being called the to to to to to protests.

  • So what's hard to estimate?

  • Numbers?

  • Some.

  • They're suggesting hundreds of thousands potentially upto a million people are taking to the streets, and it's across the country from Yang Gone to Mandalay and Napier door Now.

  • The reason for this for why today is particularly important, is because it's the 22nd of February 2021.

  • So that's a lot of twos to to to To To and dates are seen as auspicious in Myanmar.

  • It's not the first time, for instance, that we have seen protests there based on the date well, today, Facebook has removed Myanmar's state run M R T V and M R T V live pages from its platform for repeated violations of community standards.

  • If you search for the TV pages on Facebook now, well, this is what you'll see on this.

  • Could make announcements from the military less widely read and shared in Myanmar, given the volume of people who use Facebook as a primary source of information welfare calls a reporter and producer here on BBC World News.

  • She's also been following the Myanmar coup and how it's been playing out in social media for the last few weeks.

  • First of all, your reaction to this move by Facebook.

  • Well, Rose.

  • It's an interesting one.

  • It's actually played out over the course of the last two days.

  • As you stay, Facebook has removed state media pages.

  • Yesterday it removed the military's main information page from Facebook.

  • Now, considering 25 million people use Facebook in Myanmar, it's regarded as the main source of news and information in the country.

  • This will come as a a significant blow to the military.

  • The reason Facebook has decided to act now is a state media broadcaster threatening statement last night, saying that any confrontation with protesters will put lives at risk Facebook says that is a breach off their community standards.

  • But Rose.

  • I suppose it's worth noting at this point.

  • It feels a little bit like a game of wack.

  • A mole.

  • Uh, Facebook is a huge platform.

  • It's incredibly hard to regulate.

  • There are still pages linked to high ranking military officials, but I suppose it it is a step in the right direction for those who want to stop the spread of misinformation and see democracy restored.

  • So that's going on.

  • But there's a broader context.

  • Isn't there that there have been a Siris of Internet shutdowns?

  • Yeah, the military or the tap Madore is they're known locally has been using Internet censorship and restriction since the very beginning of this military coup.

  • Back in February 1, it's enacted a new cyber law, which means every Internet service provider in Myanmar must shut down the Internet from one AM to nine AM on.

  • We're seeing this happening every night.

  • It will happen again tonight for 1/9 overnight in a row on for one toe.

  • To really simplify that, it's simply pulling the plug on the entire country's Internet service.

  • Even people who use a foreign VPN will find it incredibly difficult to get a connection during these hours.

  • But on top of this, there are other measures in place is well.

  • I know that there are restrictions on thousands of I P addresses like Web Wikipedia, for example.

  • And so this appears to be a tactic used by the military to limit access to information within Myanmar.

  • And there is a huge outcry within the country.

  • And you spent a lot of time in the last three weeks on social media communicating to people in Myanmar, people who were involved in these protests, what have they made of the situation they've reached with these huge protests going on, but also with severe threats from the military?

  • I've been speaking to hundreds and hundreds of people within Myanmar.

  • They're mostly young people who have flocked from Facebook to Twitter in search of new information, foreign journalists and human rights activists.

  • And there is an overwhelming sense that they will continue to rally in the streets until they see the release of Aung San Suu, Ky.

  • And her democratically elected government.

  • Now we know and Santucci is a controversial leader for her handling of the Rohingya crisis.

  • But I think what's interesting today, Ross on social media is there's a lot of young people saying they didn't do enough to stand up for the Rohingya people and that they'd like to see democracy restored so the country can move forward and be united.

  • And while that is a great sentiment at the moment there's no clear end in sight.

  • The situation in Myanmar.

  • These protests are growing.

  • There's a huge groundswell of digital activism, but the military is sewing, showing no signs of backing down either.

  • And, uh, and this is something we'll be watching over the over the next coming days.

  • Prayer.

  • Thank you very much indeed.

  • Those of you watching to follow Frayer on Twitter Frayer cold If you'd like to get updates on the situation in Myanmar now, European Union foreign ministers have agreed today to introduce sanctions against the military in Myanmar over its seizure of power.

  • We've just been discussing it.

  • Here's your several the EU Foreign Affairs Representative today we have decided the set of targeted measures with ministers in response to these events.

  • When we took the political agreement toe, apply sanctions targeting the military responsible for the cool on the economic interest.

  • All direct financial support from our development sister to the government reform programs is good held.

  • But this is NZ in Brussels.

  • Jean, what did you make of that move on Myanmar?

  • Yes, obviously that was you.

  • Foreign ministers meeting in Brussels today to discuss a whole host of things but Myanmar very much near the top of their agenda.

  • You know, they were strong words today on Myanmar, of course, saying that they found the developments very worrying that they strongly condemned what they saw as unacceptable violence, violence that we've seen there in recent weeks on as you just played Ross.

  • They are prepared now to look at sanctions targeting the members of the military that they believe are responsible for this coup.

  • To the military leaders on the key thing they want to do is to try and starve them of their economic power.

  • So one thing we heard is that they are going to look to suspend Aled the funding that they give directly to government development and support programs.

  • Now, clearly, this comes with a worry that by starving the military and die starving the development programs in this way, you impact people in society.

  • There was a commitment from the EU today that they're going to continue working with people to try and make sure that they provide them with the basic communities that they need, but at the same time was trying to have the biggest impact on those coup leaders.

now.

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Myanmar coup: Facebook blocks military-run news site - BBC News

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    林宜悉 posted on 2021/02/23
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