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  • Two guys who haven't seen each other for some time are driving in a car on their way

  • to a bible meeting.

  • One of them, who's recently returned from a trip around Europe, says to the other, “You

  • know what they call a quarter pounder with cheese in Paris?”

  • The other man looks perplexed, surely, it's just a quarter pounder, he thinks.

  • His friend explains that in Europe they use the metric system, so a quarter of a pound

  • doesn't really mean much.

  • In France, he says, they call it a “Royale with cheese.”

  • He further surprises his good buddy by informing him that in France a burger weighing roughly

  • 113 grams is a damn tasty burger, somehow a better burger than what's served in the

  • McDonalds restaurant they frequent in North Hollywood.

  • The question is why?

  • Why do Europeans get a better standard of McDonalds than Americans?

  • After all, the fast-food burger, the cornerstone of any nutritious diet, was invented in the

  • U.S.

  • It just wouldn't seem right for Europeans to get a burger of a higher standard.

  • The answer might surprise you.

  • Let's start with a few McDonalds facts so you know how such a great American institution

  • made its way across the pond.

  • The first restaurant was opened in 1940 in San Bernardino, California.

  • That was basically a hamburger stand, but a few years later the owners, Richard and

  • Maurice McDonald, got the idea to create a system in which food could be made and served

  • fast.

  • They called this theirSpeedee Service Systemand they had a mascot calledSpeedy

  • to go with it.

  • That clown that a good chunk of the world is familiar with known as Ronald McDonald

  • didn't appear until 1965, and by that time the company had been franchised and McDonalds

  • restaurants were popping up all over the U.S.

  • By 1968, there were a thousand franchises and in 1970 the company opened its first place

  • outside of the U.S. and Canada, which was in Costa Rica.

  • A year later and a branch was opened in Japan, quickly followed by entries into the European

  • and Australian markets.

  • What the company attempted to do was make the food pretty much the same everywhere.

  • With McDonalds, the idea was you always knew what you were getting wherever you went.

  • You'll see today that this hasn't always been the case, but the same meals for the

  • most part featured on menus all over the world.

  • In 1975, if you were to order a “Filet-O-Fishor a “Quarter Pounderor anEgg McMuffin

  • in Stockholm, those dishes should have tasted the same as they would have in Boise, Idaho.

  • So, if you're one of the 68 million folks in 119 countries that every day hands over

  • his cash for a burger washed down with a tasty beverage, you should be getting what someone

  • on the other side of the world is getting.

  • We can tell you that our wayfaring staff at the Infographics Show have guiltily wolfed

  • down a McDonalds meal in countries far and wide, and we can say the same-taste experience

  • that McDonalds wants people to have works, but there are some differences.

  • And we're not just talking about meals specially devised for the tastes of certain cultures.

  • For instance, you can get a McFalafel sandwich in Egypt, or a McArabia sandwich in Bahrain,

  • or a Bulgogi Burger in South Korea, but you can also get the standard fare.

  • Ok, so first of all, just so you know we aren't making this up, the web is full of Americans

  • asking the question: Why on Earth does McDonalds taste so much better in Europe, or even in

  • Australia or New Zealand?

  • Americans it seems are getting a raw deal when it comes to one of their most famous

  • exports.

  • The first thing we should talk about is mind over matter.

  • If, for instance, you are eating your McDonalds in a very beautiful building, what you eat

  • might just taste better.

  • Trust us, a steak served on a fine China plate will taste better than a steak served in an

  • ashtray.

  • On the outskirts of Rome, you can visit the McDonalds' “museum-restaurant”, a place

  • where you can chow down on fine pastries and burgers next to ancient ruins.

  • In Porto, Portugal, you can eat under chandeliers in a quite exquisite building.

  • In Ireland, there's a restaurant situated in a 19th-century town hall, and on the Rue

  • Saint-Lazare in Paris, you can have croissants and coffee inside a building that looks like

  • something out of a children's fantasy book.

  • Ok, so some restaurants might serve some quality extras, but even if you're getting a standard

  • chicken McNuggets meal it's bound to taste better when you're eating it in a historic

  • building.

  • It's also very likely that the meal served in this building is made with more care and

  • attention, rather than your Big Mac coming to you looking like it's been in a terrible

  • accident and subsequently reconstituted by a drunk surgeon.

  • Nonetheless, for the most part, McDonalds restaurants the world over, look pretty similar.

  • In the UK there are around 1,300 branches and most of them wouldn't look out of place

  • in the U.S., but something they do over there in the UK might make a meal taste a little

  • bit better.

  • It's all about standards, something the U.S. seems to have a deficit of in the fast-food

  • world.

  • We need to talk about something calleddimethylpolysiloxane”, a chemical Americans have been unknowingly

  • eating for decades.

  • They might not have known this because it's kind of in the small print on the McDonalds

  • website.

  • It's there if you look closely, with McDonalds saying the chemical stops oil splatter.

  • This is one reason it's found in French Fries and Chicken McNuggets, as well as hash

  • browns.

  • It's not added directly to the food, but it gets in there via the cooking oil.

  • We're not quite sure just how much of a bad thing dimethylpolysiloxane is.

  • When the Chicago Tribune contacted McDonalds about it, the newspaper received no reply.

  • As it stands, the EU says it doesn't have harmful effects on the environment, but still,

  • the UK won't allow it on their fries.

  • Perhaps one positive thing about the chemical, which is a kind of silicone, is it promotes

  • hair growth.

  • That's what some scientists in Japan said anyway.

  • Maybe if you've been eating McDonald's French Fries your entire life you won't

  • go bald.

  • MaybeThe scientists injected the chemical in their test subjects rather than make them

  • eat it.

  • Another place you'll find this chemical other than on your fries is on condoms, where

  • it acts as a lubricant.

  • We could make a lewd joke about putting things in your mouth, but in the interests of decorum

  • and monetization we'll leave it there.

  • What we will say though is some countries don't think dimethylpolysiloxane is a suitable

  • or even safe accompaniment to a bit of deep-fried potato.

  • For this reason, the British won't allow that chemical in their French fries.

  • In fact, when you look at all the ingredients that go into U.S. French fries, it adds up

  • to quite a lot more than goes into UK fries, three times as much.

  • Someone asked McDonalds on its own website why this is, but the answer was vague, with

  • the company saying every country has its own regulations.

  • The EU in fact, is quite a bit stricter than the U.S. when it comes to what can be put

  • in your food.

  • In conclusion, fries in Europe might just be a bit more wholesome, a tad more potatoey.

  • There's also the fact that in some European countries you can get variations of fries,

  • and some of them actually taste like they contain lots of potato.

  • You can findbig French friesorfried potato wedgesin some countries, and they

  • might be served up with a bunch of different sauces, including cheese sauce with bacon.

  • Sweden went one step further.

  • Over there you can order flat fries with a truffle-based mayo.

  • Yep, that definitely sounds like a step up from the lube-imbued American fry.

  • Now let's talk about beef.

  • On its U.S. website, McDonald's admits that it uses growth hormones on its cattle so the

  • meat you eat has less fat.

  • This goes into the cow feed and so isn't directly shot into the animal.

  • The company says this is not unusual at all, but when we went to the McDonalds UK website

  • there was a declaration that no hormones are used on the cattle.

  • You can read this statement on the Mcdonalds UK website:

  • The use of hormonal growth promoters for cows is banned in the U.K. and rest of the

  • European Union.

  • The beef used across our menu is 100% British and Irish, and comes from farms accredited

  • by a national farm assurance scheme.”

  • Ok, so if the UK is saying this, obviously proudly saying it as a means to win-over its

  • base of burger eaters, what does that say about growth hormones in cows?

  • If it's banned, is it bad?

  • This might just be an ethical concern, but Europe goes a step further with its beef.

  • You have to ask what the cattle have been dining on.

  • In 2020, McDonalds boasted about a new burger that was made from grass-fed cattle, but that

  • was in Australia.

  • Again, if that's a good thing, then a cow that doesn't get its regular fix of rolling

  • meadow might not taste as good.

  • In 2013, NPR wrote an article about how burgers were made for McDonalds in France.

  • That article stated that all the meat was locally sourced, and all the cattle was grass-fed,

  • compared to in the U.S. where the cows had to make do with the less superior corn.

  • French cattle also had to have a passport detailing where each cow was born, where it

  • grew up, and where it was slaughtered.

  • All this, according to the writer, made for a much tastier burger than Americans were

  • getting.

  • The European Union is also not cool with how Americans treat their chickens, or we should

  • say some companies that mass produce chicken.

  • The process of washing chickens in a chlorine bath to disinfect the bird is pretty much

  • outlawed in the EU, which may explain why a chicken sandwich in Europe tastes a little

  • better than a chicken sandwich in an American McDonalds.

  • The USA Poultry and Egg Export Council didn't much like snub from Europe, and came out and

  • said there's nothing unsafe about those chicken baths.

  • It seems right now in Europe, chlorinated chicken is still a big no-no, although in

  • the UK, Prime Minister Boris Johnson has been busy trying to cozy up to the States and reverse

  • the ban.

  • He says there's no evidence that washing the birds in disinfectant is dangerous for

  • the consumer, but the EU has stood its ground, stating the process leads to horribly crowded

  • abattoirs.

  • Is meat that hasn't taken a posthumous bath in chemicals any less tasty?

  • Well, that's not an easy question to answer.

  • Maybe you just feel better knowing the dead animal in your sandwich - “Frankenbirds

  • to animal activists - didn't suffer as much.

  • Saying that, according to the World Animal Protection organization, fast food joints

  • in Europe aren't exactly taking chicken welfare seriously.

  • Then there's the 'does size matter debate'?

  • In the U.S., the Big Mac is just a little bit bigger than it is in the UK.

  • If you have more quantity, though, does that mean the quality is affected?

  • Let's also remember that the drinks are bigger in the U.S.

  • The large is larger than in European countries as are the medium and small sizes.

  • That might sound like a good thing to American diners that would happily mainline a 30 ounce

  • (887 ml) Coke, but again you have to ask, does quantity affect quality?

  • Would you sacrifice some soda or a bit of burger to know you're not eating chicken

  • that was once so deformed and depressed it longed for its big day in the abattoir?

  • So, the meat and the fries might taste a little bit different because of where the food is

  • sourced and what is added to it.

  • There are more reasons why Europe's McDonalds are better.

  • For one thing, all over Europe, you can get a beer with your burger.

  • In Belgium, you can order a beer with your Belgo burger, a sandwich garnished with roasted

  • onions and smattered with cocktail sauce and Maredsous cheese.

  • Let's face it, the American cheese slice is not the finest tasting cheese in the world.

  • In parts of Scandinavia, you can get potato tots filled with smoked cheese and spicy chili.

  • In Greece, you can opt to change the regular cheese and have creamy yogurt on your burger

  • and you can change the bun for a pita bread.

  • Come on, who in the U.S. wouldn't want to try one of those?

  • You can also get tzatziki wraps in countries all over Europe, which is similar to the Greek

  • wrap.

  • They come with vegetables and beef or chicken and they taste very fresh compared to regular

  • burgers.

  • They contain fewer calories, too, but for some reason, they've never made it to the

  • U.S.

  • We guess test audiences in the U.S. have never taken to them, even though sales surged in

  • Europe when McDonalds introduced a healthier menu there.

  • In France, you can visit a McCafe.

  • In one of those places, you might not always hear, “Do you want fries with that,” but

  • they might ask you if you feel like a chocolate croissant straight out of the oven, or perhaps

  • a couple of colorful macrons.

  • As for food for vegetarians, in 2020, McDonalds said it would start rolling out a McPlant

  • burger in various countries around the world, but right now and in the past, options have

  • been very limited for vegetarians.

  • Not in Finland, though.

  • In that country they've had a quarter-poundEl Veggoburger since 2018 and it's

  • been selling like hotcakes.

  • And let's talk about breakfast.

  • You already know you can get croissants in France, but all over Europe you can find much

  • better breakfast meals than you can find in the U.S.

  • Let's face it, the traditional McMuffin doesn't taste much like a muffin, and eating

  • the McDonalds bagel is like chewing on a sock filled with ketchup.

  • Over in the UK at the place they sometimes callMaccie Dees”, you can have a bacon

  • sourdough roll for breakfast and it's actually quite good.

  • The bread tastes like bread, the bacon is bacon.

  • Those McMuffin meals sometimes taste like airplane food or something a spaceman might

  • eat, but the British rolls actually taste fresh, as if they were made by your mom.

  • In 2019, some discerning Brits voted the McDonalds roll the best breakfast sandwich in the city

  • high street...Well, at least according to one taste test which pitted the roll against

  • five other popular breakfast sandwiches.

  • So, there you go.

  • It seems McDonalds in Europe offers many more choices and often you can eat your meal in

  • very nice surroundings.

  • There are more laws as to what goes inside your meal which makes for better quality meat

  • and fewer chemicals.

  • That's why Europe wins.

  • Now you need to watch this, “McDonald's vs Burger King - What Is The Difference?

  • Fast Food Restaurant Comparison.”

  • Or, have a look at this, “I Only Ate Fast Food For 30 Days And This Is What Happened.”

Two guys who haven't seen each other for some time are driving in a car on their way

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Reason Why McDonald's Tastes Better Outside United States

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    林宜悉 posted on 2021/02/04