Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • - [Kyle] Andrew Jackson, he looks at them

  • and just says, defend yourselves.

  • You damned rascals. (belches)

  • (inspirational music)

  • - Hello, I'm Drew Droege.

  • I've had half a bottle of Reposado Tequila,

  • and today we're talking about the newsboys' strike.

  • So it's the 1890s.

  • Also, it's New York.

  • And there are these kids that are just

  • rampant up the street.

  • These little boys that are dirty, filthy,

  • and they sold newspapers for a living.

  • They would cry on the streets and they would be like,

  • extra, extra, read all about it.

  • I'm a Newsie.

  • People, they were like, this kid is annoying.

  • Fine, I'll buy a paper.

  • It's okay.

  • Get out of my face.

  • I'm trying to enjoy my breakfast.

  • In 1898, the Spanish American War broke out.

  • And two major publishers

  • named Joseph Pulitzer and William Randolph Hearst--

  • - Namedrop.

  • - I will, I'll do it.

  • I'll name drop them.

  • Hearst and Pulitzer took advantage of this,

  • and so they raised the price of the newspapers

  • to 60 cents a bundle.

  • People were just buying newspapers.

  • They were like, I've got to find out what's going on.

  • But then when the war was over,

  • they didn't lower the price of the newspapers

  • and people weren't buying as many newspapers,

  • so the Newsies couldn't make their money back.

  • And so there were a handful of Newsies,

  • mainly led by Morris Cohen and Kid Blink.

  • Kid Blink has a patch over one eye and he looks like a man.

  • (laughs)

  • This is really,

  • this doesn't get easier.

  • You think you're gonna get a taste for the flavor

  • and it just gets more and more violent.

  • (laughs)

  • Okay, anyway. (chuckles)

  • They went to Hearst and to Pulitzer and they said,

  • would you lower the prices back to 50 cents?

  • And they said, no, we're not gonna do that.

  • We're not gonna lower the price.

  • Okay, so that's when, yeah.

  • So when they were like,

  • they were just like,

  • strike!

  • Strike!

  • You're not gonna sell that.

  • No, this is a revolution.

  • Any of the other Newsies they saw with newspapers,

  • they would take them and they would rip the papers up.

  • (grumbling)

  • (laughing)

  • William Randolph Hearst and Joseph Pulitzer

  • sent men in to go into the streets to try

  • to control these Newsies.

  • The Newsies attacked these men.

  • They attacked the men, they jumped on them.

  • They were like, uh-uh, no, no, no, no, no, no.

  • But really what, what really did something was

  • they all walked and stormed

  • and held up traffic on Brooklyn Bridge.

  • Kid Blink is giving a speech and he's saying,

  • friends and coworkers, we got to stick together like glue.

  • We, this is a time, this is something we need to do.

  • Even if you're blind, you have to do this.

  • Police drove up and they were like,

  • (cooing)

  • that's the exact noise the police car made.

  • (cooing)

  • Oh wait, there you go.

  • (cooing)

  • So the cops were like, you're going to jail.

  • (intense music)

  • And these kids were like, what are we gonna do now?

  • Like we have nothing.

  • And then Kid Blink shows up.

  • Wow.

  • Wow.

  • And he is dressed to the nines

  • and he has a wad of cash.

  • And he's like, hey, it's not that bad.

  • We should probably stop doing what we're doing.

  • We should, you know, we should respect the rules.

  • We should go back to our lives.

  • All is good.

  • So the beret, no, wait.

  • Morris Cohen was like, I get it.

  • You've been bought out.

  • We the, you, they bought you out, look at you.

  • And so they kicked Kid Blink out of the club.

  • It was like, you are not cool.

  • You're a scab and an asshole.

  • And then Morris Cohen took over.

  • And said, we're not gonna go down like that.

  • We're not gonna get bought out.

  • We're gonna do this.

  • And so they're growing in numbers.

  • More and more kids were joining the newsboys' strike.

  • And it spread to 14 different cities

  • and people weren't able to buy newspapers.

  • And so finally, these big wig men were like,

  • we gotta meet with these kids.

  • So then,

  • so then they finally met with Morris Cohen.

  • He sat down and said, hey.

  • What do you want?

  • And the kids were like,

  • you have to lower the price of the newspapers.

  • And they said, we're not gonna do that.

  • And they said, okay, well then you at least

  • need to buy back the papers that we don't sell.

  • And they said, okay, we'll do that.

  • And the kids were like, hurrah.

  • You can't mess with us.

  • We have figured it out.

  • (hums) We win.

  • It was a wonderful, wonderful time.

  • Wonderful day.

  • The Newsies united and created change.

  • Yay, kids.

  • - Hello.

  • I'm Kyle Kinane.

  • And today we're gonna talk about Andrew Jackson.

  • The brawler.

  • Starting early 1800s.

  • America.

  • Andrew Jackson's army, they're in Tennessee.

  • He's an accomplished duelist.

  • Jackson's been a soldier and brawler my whole time.

  • I'm a bad ass dude.

  • So there's a couple of brothers

  • named Thomas and Jesse Benton.

  • They're officers in Andrew Jackson's army.

  • These two brothers, they're a couple of rabble-rousers.

  • Couple of troublemakers.

  • Thomas, he's power hungry.

  • He wants to make it.

  • He just wants, he wants, he wants, he wants it.

  • Becomes Jackson's right-hand man.

  • Jackson likes him so much, he sends him to DC.

  • Jesse Benton, still in Tennessee.

  • Probably the regiment, gets in an argument

  • with another fella under Jackson's regime

  • by the name of William Carroll.

  • Some old timey argument.

  • Jabber jabber jabber, jabber jabber jabber.

  • No end result.

  • (chuckles) We're not gonna settle this with words.

  • All right, let's meet in the field and shoot at each other.

  • Duel.

  • So that's it. (laughs)

  • It's very inefficient, it's very inefficient.

  • So William Carroll knows he's experienced.

  • He's like, so listen, Andy, do me a solid,

  • I'm working onto you.

  • Can you be on the ones and twos for me?

  • Andrew Jackson says, you know what?

  • I'm your second, let's go ahead.

  • Duel.

  • So the duel goes down.

  • 10 paced duel.

  • Turn, spit, shoot, boom.

  • Carroll gets his thumb blown off.

  • Still gets one off.

  • Shoots Jesse Benton in his ass.

  • Hilarious shot.

  • (laughing)

  • People are, they're going, they're like,

  • did you hear about the duel?

  • Jesse Benton's got an extra asshole.

  • (laughing)

  • Ah all right, all right, get them giggles out.

  • Ooh yeah. (chuckling)

  • The word gets all the way back.

  • Thomas Benton, Jesse's brother,

  • he's over there, DC, he's hearing about this.

  • He's like, what?

  • Where I left, now they're laughing about my name?

  • And it's because Jackson supported this other guy?

  • Now Thomas, who's been Andrew Jackson's aid, is furious.

  • It's Andrew Jackson's fault

  • for even allowing this stupid duel to happen.

  • So he's not gonna stand for it.

  • He heads back to Tennessee

  • to restore honor to his family name.

  • Andrew Jackson, back in Tennessee,

  • he's hearing all this (bleep) talk.

  • He's upset about all this.

  • I'm Andrew goddamn Jackson.

  • I'm gonna whip sense into these Benton brothers.

  • Literally, he walks around for six weeks

  • with a bullwhip on his belt.

  • Says some real passo-agro (bleep).

  • (whipping)

  • You know how whips sound, put in a sound effect.

  • Post production.

  • Silent take, post produc.

  • (laughing)

  • - Okay so do you remember where you are?

  • - They're all in Tennessee.

  • Nashville.

  • September 4th, 1813.

  • The Bentons are holed up at a hotel.

  • Other end of the strip.

  • Andrew Jackson and his good buddy John Coffee,

  • they're hanging.

  • They all know why they're there.

  • They got beef.

  • Old timey beef, 1800s beef.

  • Andrew Jackson's like, hey, John.

  • Your name is indicative of morning activity, John Coffee.

  • Let's go take a morning stroll.

  • Let's go get my mail from the post office.

  • So they take a little stroll around town.

  • Oh, did it happen to take a circ,

  • roundabout way in front of the hotel?

  • Benton brothers posted up like,

  • yeah, we expected this much.

  • Andrew Jackson, he looks at them

  • and just says, defend yourselves.

  • You damned rascals. (belches)

  • That was the final moment.

  • Thomas Benton goes to the sidearm.

  • Andrew Jackson already has it pulled.

  • So Thomas, he goes back in the hotel.

  • Meanwhile, Jesse's coming around sneakily.

  • There's Andrew Jackson, but he doesn't see that

  • Jesse's come around the corner.

  • Fires off at Jackson.

  • Bang, bang, Jackson, he gets shot twice.

  • In the wing.

  • Jackson goes to throw one off at Thomas.

  • The gun misfires (spits)

  • and it just farts out a musket.

  • Burns a hole in his jacket.

  • Coffee runs in.

  • Coffee fires a few shots at Thomas.

  • Oh, I'm being shot at?

  • What's my safest bet?

  • Let me just roll down these stairs.

  • (intense music)

  • He did that to himself voluntarily and...

  • (intense music)

  • Now we've got another Andrew Jackson supporter

  • that just jumps in out of nowhere.

  • Stokely Hayes.