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  • - Hi, my name's Terry Meurer.

  • I'm the co-creator and executive producer

  • of Unsolved Mysteries.

  • And I'm going to share with you how we find

  • the stories that we produce for the series.

  • (Unsolved Mysteries theme music)

  • There's a lot of different ways that stories come to us.

  • We have story submissions that come in

  • from viewers who watch the episodes.

  • And we have a team that goes through

  • all of those submissions to try and find

  • the strongest mysteries and the most viable mysteries.

  • We have had hundreds and hundreds of stories

  • submitted to us.

  • And as the executive producer of the show,

  • probably the most challenging part of my job

  • is the story selection,

  • and which stories are we going to tell.

  • When we begin a season of Unsolved Mysteries,

  • we usually have all the stories chosen

  • before we start production.

  • We want to always make sure that we have

  • a variety of different kinds of mysteries.

  • So a murder, a wanted,

  • a missing persons case, an unexplained death,

  • and a paranormal case.

  • Because we feel like that the viewers

  • want a variety of mysteries.

  • And everybody isn't interested in exactly the same mystery.

  • We look for a combination of stories,

  • international and domestic both.

  • We look for rural and urban.

  • We look for diversity in race, and in culture,

  • and in ethnicity, and age.

  • Volume two we have a case of

  • the Washington insider John Wheeler

  • who's very high profile in Washington D.C.

  • And we also have missing children from a park in Harlem.

  • We want the audience to feel like they're looking at

  • a variety of different people from all walks of life.

  • In volume one,

  • the story of Lena Chapin,

  • it's the missing witness episode,

  • that story came to us through Lena's sister Brandi,

  • who reached out to us and wanted us to do her story.

  • - I miss her.

  • I miss her so much it kills me.

  • - We get story submissions from law enforcement too

  • because they know that by getting their case

  • on Unsolved Mysteries, there's a really good chance

  • that it will get solved.

  • Lester Eubanks is an example of that,

  • the case of death row fugitive which is in volume two.

  • The US Marshals reached out to us

  • and asked us if we would do that story.

  • At the Unsolved Mysteries offices,

  • we have what we kind of call a war room.

  • It's basically a conference room

  • that is surrounded by cork board, by bulletin board.

  • And we put all the stories that are contenders

  • up on that board and we just kind of move them around

  • and try and figure out what the best

  • combination of stories would be.

  • The twists and turns and the questions

  • that we ask in our story meeting,

  • we know are questions that the audience is going to ask.

  • And so when we all start engaging

  • in a conversation about a story,

  • we know that the audience will as well.

  • When we choose a story,

  • it's important to us that all the people

  • involved in the story want the story to be told

  • and want to participate.

  • So we do respect people who prefer not to have

  • that publicity and that notoriety.

  • There are a lot of people who just

  • have lived with the pain, and the tragedy,

  • and the loss for so long.

  • It is very hard for them to talk about it again

  • and to have all the publicity and to have their hopes

  • raised again because they're afraid

  • that the case still won't be solved.

  • After we find an Unsolved Mysteries story

  • that we feel would make a strong episode,

  • we go out and scout the story.

  • We meet the people

  • who we are going to interview in the story.

  • We look at the locations and we just make sure

  • that all the pieces are going to come together.

  • We always shoot all the episodes on location

  • because we feel like that gives it

  • an authenticity that we wouldn't get

  • if we just shot everything in one location.

  • So scouting the stories is very important.

  • We come back, we write up a rough outline

  • of how that story would go together,

  • and then we put that into production.

  • We always have a lot of footage,

  • a lot of interview material especially to go through.

  • And we don't have a narrator anymore

  • as we did with the original episodes with Robert Stack.

  • So the interviewees themselves

  • are the ones that are telling the stories.

  • We've done a lot of mysteries.

  • Over the years we've done over 1,300 cases.

  • A lot of people will say,

  • oh, these stories are so sad, and they're so tragic,

  • and how do you do this after all these years?

  • And I think the thing that keeps us going

  • is the hope that we can solve these mysteries.

  • That's why we do what we do.

  • This is often the court of last resort.

  • Their cases have gone cold

  • and there's not a lot of attention on these cases.

  • And we come in and we shine a light on those cases

  • and see if we can reinvigorate the investigation

  • and bring in some more leads.

  • That's how we choose stories here at Unsolved Mysteries.

  • So check out volume two now streaming on Netflix.

- Hi, my name's Terry Meurer.

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How The Unsolved Mystery Team Finds Their Mysteries | Netflix

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    林宜悉 posted on 2021/02/04
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