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  • Hey guys, welcome back to my Channel today

  • I'm going to be answering some of the most frequently asked questions that I get regarding living in Japan

  • moving to Japan, going to school here, and just things regarding

  • my experiences after living here for about 15 years now

  • I hope there's something interesting in this video for you

  • If you are planning on moving to Japan in the future yourself

  • or if you're just curious about what life is like here in Japan, so let's get started

  • I get asked this question all the time

  • "Is there any way we can live in Japan without teaching English?"

  • so teaching English is usually the profession of choice

  • for foreigners that come to live in Japan, just because it's a job that you can get here quite easily

  • even without any Japanese skill whatsoever

  • But actually I really recommend trying to get a student visa if you're interested in studying anything even just the Japanese language

  • You can get into a Japanese school, like a Japanese language school here

  • you'll get a student visa and you'll be able to live in Japan,

  • study Japanese and you will have the ability to work part-time if you apply for it

  • So that's the easiest way that comes to mind

  • For you guys to be able to live here without having to teach English

  • It is possible to get jobs in other fields, but in most cases obviously Japanese skill is going to be required

  • So as for jobs you can get without any Japanese skill

  • it's pretty limited and most people do start off as an English teacher and kind of branch out from there

  • after living here for a few years

  • Probably the second most commonly asked question I get is "Is it possible for a foreigner to get a job in Japan without a degree?"

  • So as many of you probably know

  • in most cases

  • it's required to have a

  • Bachelor's degree to get a full-time working position here in Japan. As for being able to get a job without a degree

  • it's actually not getting the job that is the hard part, many places will hire you without having a bachelor's degree

  • but it's getting the

  • working visa

  • which gives you permission to stay in Japan for a long period of time and to work a full-time job

  • That requires the degree. I do know one person

  • In all of my experience here in Japan

  • I do know one person that was able to get a working visa without a degree

  • But they did have lots of experience in their field

  • That is one way to get around it

  • If you have years of experience

  • In the field of the job that you're applying for, it could be possible to get a visa without that degree

  • However, if you are from a country that has the working holiday visa

  • it's very simple to get that visa and you don't need any degree whatsoever

  • That was the first visa I ever used when I came to Japan and I lived here for a year

  • But you're only allowed to work part-time on that visa, you can't have a full-time position

  • But that is how I managed to spend my first year in Japan. I'm very lucky as a Canadian we have that visa

  • Americans don't have that option, unfortunately

  • So again

  • I would suggest that you come over as

  • a student and kind of get used to living in Japan that way and if you decide you really like it

  • you could always finish your degree or do a whole degree at

  • a Japanese university like I did, which was a pretty cool experience

  • "Best onsens for new travelers coming to Japan in the future." Okay. I really recommend the Hoshino Resort chain

  • it's a chain of

  • Onsens all throughout Japan and each one kind of has its own theme. If you guys watched my vlogmas my day one vlogmas

  • episode was at one of these Hoshino resorts in Aomori

  • and it was apple themed because Aomori is famous for apples and

  • just the way they've designed their resorts it, they're just so beautiful

  • They're so nicely done and it's common to be able to rent a room that has a private bath in the room

  • So if you have tattoos

  • Or if you are just uncomfortable bathing with other people,

  • which I am in most cases, then it's cool that they offer those rooms with the private baths. They can be a little pricey

  • so it's more of like a splurgy thing that you would probably just do for one night, maybe two nights

  • but I really do recommend it and I think it's totally worth the money

  • "Who is Mark and how did you meet?" So you guys might have seen Mark in my videos

  • He pops in every once in a while probably because he's my one of my only friends up here in Morioka

  • Mark's one of my good friends we met about

  • I think it was four years,

  • three or four years ago now. I actually made a video about the day we met so if you're curious

  • about how that all happened I'll link that down below, but I was introduced by my previous boss on an English teaching job

  • I came up here and I went to visit my old school and Mark was a new teacher there

  • My boss is like oh you guys should hang out, Mark works at a magic bar, and it's really cool

  • You should go check it out, and we ended up spending the day together and we became friends

  • So yeah, Mark is one of my good friends. Not my boyfriend, as many of you think

  • "What's the hardest part about living in Japan?" I don't find too many things that challenging here actualy,

  • it's quite comfortable to live here. I don't struggle with the language at all

  • So I don't usually have any problems in that regard

  • Probably one of the oldest things I really don't like about living in Japan

  • is how thin the walls are, and how I can hear every single thing

  • my neighbors are doing it can just be the quietest thing. They can be like coughing or snoring

  • I hear their phone alarm go off in the morning. I hear every single conversation they have with their partner

  • So that's one thing that I don't like because I feel really self-conscious about watching movies

  • I feel like I have to have the volume down super low and I don't like that

  • So yeah

  • that would be the one thing. Kinda related to my last answer "Are people in Japanese apartments pretty

  • respectful as far as noise from neighbors goes or is it pretty much like the rest of the world where it is varies from person

  • to person?" I would say in general people are really respectful and quiet here because everybody knows that the walls are always so thin

  • In all my time in Japan,

  • I've only lived in one apartment that had thick enough walls that I didn't have to be like super careful about making noise

  • So, yeah, in general people are very respectful about it

  • But like I said, even though my neighbors aren't being particularly noisy, I can still hear every single thing that's going on

  • "We all know how much of a cat person you are,

  • do you think you'll ever get a dog too?"

  • I've never really had the urge to have a pet dog. If I was ever gonna get a pet, it would be a cat

  • 100% but if for some reason

  • I felt like I really wanted a dog. There is one breed of dog that I've fallen in love with recently

  • I watched vlogs from a girl that lives in Vancouver. Her name's Melissa Merk and she has this adorable Aussie

  • I think the breed is called Aussie. The colors of the dog are just so beautiful. So that would be the dog

  • I would like to have if I did ever get a dog, but honestly, it probably won't happen

  • "What villagers are you current looking for in-game?" If you don't play Animal Crossing, this comment doesn't make any sense to you

  • But this is in reference to Animal Crossing the video game I've been playing a lot recently. I want Lolly

  • That's all I want in life. If I can get Lolly in my game, I will be forever happy

  • "You said you want to leave Japan in five years or so, in what country do you see yourself living?"

  • So yeah, I don't know how long I will stay here in Japan, but I don't want to stay here forever

  • I know that. I know that I don't want to settle down here and buy a house or anything

  • So in the future, I would like to move somewhere

  • where I don't speak the language 'cause I love learning new languages and I just love learning about new cultures, so it would probably

  • end up being somewhere in Europe. I thought it would be really cool to live in like Germany or Hungary,

  • Sweden

  • Honestly any place like that. Somewhere completely different that I haven't experienced before.

  • "Which has been your favorite video to shoot and why?" I would say

  • I have lots of fun times with my friends. I love the ones when I'm filming with my friends, but probably my favourite

  • experience in Japan that like translated into a really pretty video would probably be the Shimanami Kaido

  • Not many people watched that video and it was such a bummer

  • It was such a hard one to title because it was all just really about the scenery which isn't really, you know

  • intriguing or clickbaity in any way, but if you haven't seen that video, please do go watch it

  • the Shimanami Kaido is

  • a very beautiful area of Japan that I highly suggest you visit on your next trip here if possible.

  • "Are the tourist traps like Shinjuku, Skytree, etc worth seeing or are they overrated?" Honestly

  • all the like super famous touristy spots in Japan, I do think they're worth seeing. I don't find them like overly

  • touristy or cringy or anything? They're all really nice

  • And I think they would be worth your time, except for maybe the temple in Asakusa

  • I feel like they've made it just so touristy and like all the the souvenirs and stuff

  • they sell up near the temple just aren't really, like, quality

  • items and they're not things that you would normally see for sale in Japan. So it just feels very fake and like

  • fabricated

  • Sensō-ji temple, that's the name

  • Yeah

  • I wouldn't really recommend

  • going there but Asakusa itself is so beautiful and there's so many cool, like, traditional shops and

  • streets and tea shops and stuff, around that area

  • So the area itself is awesome, but maybe yes

  • Sensō-ji temple, not my favorite.

  • "Are a lot of the prebottled teas unsweetened. And what is your go-to favorite?"

  • So if you see a tea like this in a convenience store or a vending machine it will

  • not be sweetened. Green teas are never sweetened here in Japan, which is pretty cool because

  • overseas, you'll notice that lots of the green teas are sweetened. I feel like it doesn't need it.

  • You really get used to drinking it without any sweetness and it tastes a lot better

  • So yeah

  • Any of these green teas are never sweetened, lots of the black teas even, aren't sweetened. If there is one that has sugar in it

  • It will be clearly labeled

  • My go-to favorite at the moment is the soy milk tea that recently came out

  • I've been waiting for a soy milk tea for years. Milk tea was always my, like, go-to drink

  • Every time I bought a drink from the combini, or a vending machine

  • it would be milk tea and ever since I stopped eating dairy

  • I've really missed milk tea

  • But they brought it back now in a soy milk version and it tastes just like the original. It's amazing

  • "How is Morioka during Fall?" Morioka is probably at its peak during Fall

  • If you are planning to come up and visit the Iwate area I highly suggest you do it in the Fall because the leaves

  • are just amazing. I'll link a video down below that I did exploring the Hachimantai area,

  • which is a very mountainous area, near my house. They have hiking trails and the views up there are just spectacular

  • "Do you plan to get any more tattoos?" I don't have any planned

  • however, I'm so happy with the last one that I got that I really want to get another one from her

  • She's just such an amazing artist and even though I don't really have one in mind that I really want

  • I probably will think of another one to get

  • Just so I have an excuse to go back to her and get another piece of her art because she's just so freaking cool

  • "What's the worst thing that's happened to you while living in Japan?"

  • Okay, this is kind of funny because actually my, like, worst experience in Japan ever, happened during my first trip here, like

  • ages ago. I think I was 16 or 17 at the time. I was at my home stays' house. We were walking

  • behind the house. They had a huge

  • farmland, full of like rice fields and

  • we were walking through the rice fields and I got stung by a Japanese Hornet, the ones you hear about

  • and everybody tells you to avoid because it can be deadly and

  • extremely painful and I've gotten stung by probably every bee, wasp,

  • hornet, under the moon. Living in Canada, it's very common

  • to just go outside in bare feet when you're a kid and run around and that resulted in me getting stung by everything

  • But the Hornet is definitely on a new level of pain. It was crazy

  • It hurt so freakin much, but the pain quickly

  • disappeared and turned to like absolute shock and horror as

  • my homestay mother, like, instructed for me to lie on the ground and

  • proceeded to suck on my foot.

  • Didn't see that coming, didn't know what was going on. I didn't speak Japanese at the time so I couldn't ask her

  • what the hell she was doing. But when it was all over

  • my homestay sister who spoke a little bit of English

  • explained to me that the Japanese Hornets can be very dangerous and some people die from their sting

  • So my mom, my homestay mom,

  • was trying to suck the poison out of my foot so that I wouldn't have a horrible reaction to it

  • And I don't know if it's because she did that, or what, but I was fine, like besides the pain,

  • nothing horrible happened to me. So thank you awesome Japanese homestay mom

  • That was just like the most memorable

  • experience ever in Japan. I don't think I'll ever forget that day

  • "I'm planning a month-long trip to Japan. Once the world has gone back to some form of normality

  • Would you recommend Morioka as a place to visit?"

  • Um, yes,

  • especially if you're gonna be here for a whole month, that gives you plenty of time to explore Tokyo and

  • even go down to southern Japan for a bit and still have some time to come up here and see the north

  • I feel like it's always last on everybody's list, but it's so beautiful up here

  • And especially if you're here during the hot months of the Summer it is so much more comfortable up here

  • It's about 3 to 4 degrees cooler and less humid

  • And there's just so many pretty places to see, so yeah highly recommend

  • you come to Morioka, but not only Morioka, please explore the whole area. There's lots of beautiful

  • coastlines to see up in northern Japan along Aomori and

  • Iwate, so see the coastlines, come to Morioka, climb the mountains at Hachimantai. There's tons to see up here

  • So, yes, definitely, please come.

  • "What has been the most effective way for you to improve your Japanese language skills?" So I haven't been

  • studying Japanese for a long time, but back when I was trying to improve my language skills,

  • like the number one way would be to hang out with Japanese people. So, make some Japanese friends

  • I was so lucky at the time. I worked at a place that

  • toured Japanese exchange students around the city

  • So I met so many Japanese people and we kept in touch afterwards by

  • writing letters back and forth to each other, which was an amazing way for me to practice my Japanese

  • But now you guys have Twitter and all these cool things that I didn't have that then. So try and make some friends online

  • Chat with them,

  • in DMs, or just back and forth on Twitter, or on Instagram, leaving comments on their post

  • It's like such a cool way to practice your Japanese and just practice some basic phrases

  • So if you can make friends in person

  • that is the best, but now that you've got all these tools online that you can use, social media is an awesome way that I

  • would recommend to practice Japanese.

  • "What was your favorite experience meeting a local or unique person in Japan?"

  • I've been super lucky and I've met lots of cool Japanese people during my time here. Probably my favorite

  • relationship that I built up over the years was back when I was in university

  • I used to tutor English, and I was tutoring this high school boy and his mom was like

  • "Oh, I have a friend that would also like to take English classes from you.

  • Can I introduce you?" and it ended up being this lady in her 70s whose husband had recently died

  • and she was living alone in this huge house out in the countryside and

  • she invited me over to do English lessons with her once a week, and we actually became really good friends. She was super cool

  • She was an artist, her house was amazing. It was kind of like really modern. She was a sculptor,

  • so there are just these amazing sculptures all throughout her house. She had this gorgeous japanese-style garden

  • and yeah, we became really good friends, and she would take me out for road trips. We'd go out for lunch together

  • We'd do, like, barbecues in