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  • Homophones, homophones, homophones.

  • More homophones.

  • Have I told you?

  • Do you know what "homophones" are yet?

  • Maybe you've watched other lessons about homophones, but they're the coolest things ever.

  • "Homophones" are two words that have the exact same-exact same-pronunciation, but two completely

  • different meanings.

  • So, the homophones I have selected today for you are present tense verbs.

  • So, maybe you have a whole list of verbs you have to remember.

  • It's crazy to be able to remember all of these verbs.

  • Sometimes I don't remember the verbs; I'm like: "What was it?"

  • So, homophones are really, really, really amazingly helpful for a hundred reasons; one

  • of them being it helps you remember verbs visually.

  • Two, it helps you with pronunciation - yes, or confuses you with pronunciation.

  • And the third thing is we do these crazy things called making jokes.

  • So, maybe you see something written down in English on Instagram, or Facebook, or Twitter,

  • or whatever you're on, and the word is spelt wrong, and you show it to your friend, and

  • your friend says: "Hahaha, that's funny."

  • Why is it funny?

  • Because the spelling is wrong.

  • Maybe you're looking at a joke that has a homophone is it... is it?

  • Innit.

  • What?

  • A homophone innit.

  • So, let's check out these ones.

  • The verb "hear", right?

  • Similar to listen.

  • The homophone of "hear" is "here".

  • Uh-oh.

  • Did you hear that?

  • "Hear", "here".

  • So, we know that these meanings are different because "hear" as a verb means to listen to

  • something, and "here" is talking about an adverb of place.

  • So, "hear", "here".

  • Are you with me?

  • Do you get this?

  • It's easy because I teach you the one pronunciation and the other pronunciation is the same.

  • "Be".

  • You guys know this verb.

  • Don't you hate this verb?

  • You've conjugated this verb until you're blue in the face, and the verb is "be".

  • And then-buzz-we also have "bee" that is an insect.

  • Now, bees are fascinating creatures.

  • Do you know what they do?

  • They're crazy.

  • How do they do this?

  • They make honey, so they go to flowers, they collect pollen, they bring it back to the

  • next and I don't know what they do with their bums-I don't know how they make honey-and

  • then we eat it.

  • I'd like to know who the first person was that found honey and decided that we should

  • steal it from bees.

  • So, "bee" is an insect.

  • So, maybe you can see things like: "Bee.

  • Will the bees be?"

  • Something.

  • You make a joke; go ahead.

  • Write it in the comments.

  • If it's funny, I'll laugh at it.

  • Next one: "wait".

  • So, "wait" means you have to stay still or do... not do something for a little bit.

  • We also have the homophone... how do you say it?

  • It looks like: "wei-g-h-t".

  • Doesn't it?

  • You read it, go: "wei-g-h-t", but it's actually the same pronunciation of this verb "wait".

  • This "weight" means a measurement.

  • So, people might ask you: "What is your weight?"

  • And you go: "I have to wait?

  • What am I waiting for?"

  • But they want to know how many pounds-by the way, this is the short form for pounds-or

  • kilograms you are.

  • So, "weight" is a measurement, "bee" is an insect, and "here" is an adverb of place.

  • Dunh-dunh-dunh-dunh.

  • Next one.

  • Don't you hate it when people chew loudly?

  • If we put an "s" on the verb "chew", it becomes "chews".

  • And we also have another verb that's a homophone.

  • So, "chews", as in when you're eating something, and "choose" as a verb means to pick something.

  • Now, the problem with this is a lot of people are going to use the noun "choice".

  • Hey, that's wrong.

  • You want to make sure that you're saying the present tense "choose".

  • So, I can say: "I choose to chew gum."

  • Not funny.

  • Not a homophone.

  • "Chews", "choose".

  • The next one is "bare".

  • Some people... you might hear people say: "You have the right to bear arms."

  • That's funny.

  • Not these kind of arms.

  • "You have the right to bear arms" means carry a gun.

  • So, "bear" means to carry something; it also means the absence of a cover.

  • So, if I do this, my arms are bare.

  • And then you think: "Hey, hey, hey, hey, Ronnie.

  • I know what a 'bear' is.

  • A 'bear' is: Rawr."

  • A "bear" is an animal, but these, again, are homophones.

  • So, I can say: "Fuzzy Wuzzy was a bear.

  • He was a... he had no hair.

  • He was a bare bear."

  • So, he was a bear with no hair.

  • Funny?

  • Yes.

  • These are hilarious.

  • Laugh; it's great.

  • The next one is the verb "hire".

  • If you hire someone, it means that you give them a job.

  • The opposite of "hire" is to "fire" someone.

  • If you get fired, it means that your boss... they don't kill you, sorry.

  • Your boss that takes your job away.

  • This is a bad thing.

  • But if you are hired for a job, it means that you get the job; someone gives you a job.

  • Then we have the homophone "higher".

  • Hmm.

  • Which one makes more sense?

  • I think, for me, this one makes more sense because, again, why is there a "g"?

  • It's not "hi-g-her"; it's "higher".

  • So, this "higher" tells us about the space of something.

  • So, I can say: "Put your hand higher" or "Raise up your hand".

  • So, give someone a job; make something go up.

  • Do you like homophones yet?

  • Are they easy?

  • Do they help you remember verbs?

  • We've got more.

  • Okay?

  • Okay?

  • Hold on.

  • So, this one's fun.

  • No, this one's fun; this one's not fun.

  • This one's fun.

  • "Waste".

  • To "waste" something means that you do not use it and maybe you throw it in the garbage.

  • We also have a part of our body, which is called the "waist".

  • The "waist" is the middle section of your body.

  • I'm not very good at drawing, but I will attempt to draw a waist.

  • Well, this is a very skinny waist.

  • So, in the middle of your waist maybe you have a bellybutton.

  • So, the "waist" is the middle part of your body.

  • Some people's waists look like this, and that's fine, but it means the middle part of your

  • body.

  • Do you have a waist?

  • Don't waste your waist.

  • No, it's not a joke yet.

  • Come on, write some jokes; I'm dying up here.

  • Next one.

  • This one's fun.

  • This is the fun homophone.

  • This word looks like "write", and this one looks like "rig-h-t", but actually "write"

  • and "right", being homophones, sound exactly the same.

  • So, this verb "to write", what I'm doing right now.

  • And this "right" has two meanings; one, it means a direction - turn right or turn left,

  • and the other meaning means it is correct.

  • So, I can say: "Is it right to write left?"

  • What?

  • Is it right to write this?

  • "Ronnie, why are you saying 'write' twice?

  • What's going on?

  • Oh, it's a homophone."

  • Next one, we have: "break" and "brake".

  • This "brake" you probably, hopefully have on your car.

  • Your car probably has two pedals.

  • Now, "pedals" are the things that you hit with your feet when you're driving.

  • Most cars, automatic cars have a gas pedal-woo-and a brake pedal.

  • So, a brake pedal is going to make your car stop or slow down.

  • This "break" as a verb means that you destroy something.

  • "Don't break the marker, Ronnie."

  • So, again, homophones: "break"/"brake" - one means to put something in half or damage something,

  • and this "brake" means to stop or slow down when you drive as a pedal.

  • I like this one.

  • -"Do you know?"

  • -"No, I don't know."

  • In English, a lot of the time when we have a "k" at the beginning of the word, it's silent,

  • like a "knife".

  • We don't say: "k-nifey"; we say: "knife".

  • This is not an exception to this rule.

  • So, "know" as the verb, we don't say the "w" at the end either.

  • I'm telling ya, people that made English, I think they were drunk and they said: "Let's

  • just put in some extra letters here to make it fun for the people and give Ronnie a job."

  • Oh, thank you, drunk people.

  • So, "know" is the same as the word "no", which is the opposite of "yes".

  • So: "I know.

  • No."

  • That's a funny joke somehow.

  • Even if we put an "s" on this, so we... it becomes "knows"... hey, do you have a "nose"?

  • It's the thing on your face.

  • So, you can say: "My nose knows."

  • These are how a lot of old-man jokes, or dad jokes, or grandfather jokes are made.

  • Ronnie loves these jokes; I think they're the best.

  • My Dad used to tell me them, too.

  • Do you have a good dad joke?

  • My nose knows.

  • The next one.

  • This looks really, really strange, but believe me and trust me when I tell you it's a homophone:

  • "bury", "berry".

  • Now, some people might say: "burry", but that's wrong; it's actually "bury" and "berry".

  • So you guys probably know strawberry, blueberry, raspberry - that's a berry.

  • But this verb "bury" means to put something under the ground.

  • So, a dog buries his bone; not a strawberry, but a berry.

  • So, this verb "bury" means to put underground.

  • Sometimes when people die we bury them in the ground; sometimes we burn them and then

  • bury them.

  • This just got so morbid - I love that.

  • So, "bury" means to put something under the ground.

  • So, you can bury a berry.

  • So, you can take a strawberry, go outside, dig a hole, and put it under the ground.

  • And your friend's like: "What are you doing?"

  • And you say: "I'm burying a berry.

  • Leave me alone."

  • Next one we have: "die"-oh, look how morbid it got-and then "dye".

  • So, this verb "die" is what I just explained.

  • When you die, it means you no longer are alive.

  • Rule number one in life of Ronnie is: Don't die, because everything else is irrelevant

  • if you die.

  • The next word "dye" means to change the colour of something.

  • So, for example, a lot of people dye their hair.

  • Don't worry, their hair is not dead; it just means that they change the colour.

  • Most of our clothes are also dyed.

  • Oh, my God, my clothes are died, what can I do?

  • No.

  • It just means that they've colour... they've changed the colour of it.

  • So, we have many beautiful colours of dye; you can dye anything, really.

  • Just don't die yourself.

  • This is "die", "dye".

  • Next one - three.

  • Oh, you guys get a super bonus, okay?

  • You're lucky.

  • I'm feeling generous today.

  • "Do".

  • The verb "do" is something that implies action.

  • So, for example, I can say: "I do homework" or "I do the dishes".

  • We also have the word: "dew" and then "due".

  • This word "dew", do you know what it means?

  • "Dew" is in the morning when you wake up, there is little bits of water on the grass,

  • but we don't actually call this: "Oo, look at the little bits of water on the grass."

  • We call it "dew".

  • So, "dew" are tiny droplets of water that form scientifically somehow-magic; it's magic-in

  • the grass in the morning.

  • This word "due", you probably know this if you have to do assignments or you have to

  • go take your library book back.

  • You might have a due date; also if you're pregnant.

  • If something is due, it means the time limit.

  • So, for example, if you borrow a library book, you look at the due date and it says: "You

  • must return this book by January 5th or you're going to pay the library ten cents."

  • You got to get that book back because that's when it is due.

  • So, that means that's when the time has finished.

  • So, "do", "dew", "due".

  • Doo-doo-doo-doo-doo-doo-doo.

  • This is one of my favourite homophones.

  • Okay, this is one of my favourite homophones, and this is one of my favourite homophones