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  • The police have the suspect dead to rightsThey say they've interrogated him for hours,  

  • gotten a confession, and ruled out any alibisThey're ready to take the case to the judge.  

  • If that's not enough proof for the  judge to approve criminal charges,  

  • there's the evidence. This is rock-solid  proof that they've got the right guy,  

  • and there's no jury that would acquit once they've  seen the evidence. There's only one problem.

  • The evidence wasn't real. It  was planted by the officers.

  • Does this really happen? Do the police plant  evidence to get false convictions or to protect  

  • themselves from charges? It happens more often  than you think, and here are eight of the most  

  • shocking cases where the police  planted evidence - including one  

  • that brought in the federal  government to investigate.

  • The first case takes place in rural New Zealand  in 1970, when crimes that made the front page  

  • were rare. So it shocked the farming community  of Lower Waikato when young farm couple Harvey  

  • and Jeanette Crew were found brutally murdered  on their ranch. Jeanette's father had legal and  

  • financial trouble before, and their farm had been  plagued by burglaries and arson. They were set to  

  • receive her mother's share in the farm shortlywhich would make life with their toddler daughter  

  • much easier. Then they went missing, and their  eighteen-month-old was found alone in her crib.  

  • Doctors said the baby had been alone for at  least two days and was severely dehydrated.  

  • But it would be almost two months before the  couple's bodies were found, shot to death.

  • Police immediately zeroed in on a suspect.

  • Arthur Alan Thomas lived on a neighboring farm  and it was discovered that his car axle had  

  • been used to weigh down Harvey's body. When the  police searched the Crewe house again and found  

  • a cartridge from Thomas' rifle in the garden, his  fate was sealed. He was charged with two counts  

  • of murder despite his wife and cousin giving  him an alibi. The star witness? Lenard Demler,  

  • Jeanette's father who had been forced to  sell them his half of the farm. Thomas was  

  • convicted twice despite little evidence, with  the first conviction being thrown out on appeal.  

  • Supporters and investigators quickly began  campaigning for a pardon and after nine years,  

  • evidence came out that the batch of cartridges  the bullet came from couldn't have been from his  

  • gun. Thomas was pardoned, and two Detectives  were investigated for planting the evidence.  

  • While they were both implicated in  misconduct, neither was ever charged.

  • But corrupt police don't just plant evidence to  solve crimes - they do it to get away with them.

  • It was the footage that outraged a nation in 2015.  Many controversial police shootings had taken  

  • place over the previous year, but few as shocking  as the one that happened in North Charleston,  

  • South Carolina. Walter Scott was a forklift  operator who had a warrant out for his arrest  

  • for missing a child support hearing. Michael  Slager was a police officer with several  

  • accusations of excessive force against him. When  Slager stopped Scott for a broken brake light,  

  • he found out about the warrant and  moved to arrest him. Scott ran,  

  • and the two briefly scuffled. When a taser  didn't knock Scott out and he turned to run,  

  • Slager pulled out his gun and shot Scott  eight times, hitting him fatally in the back.  

  • Slager justified his actions by saying that  Scott had taken his taser and was a threat.

  • There was just one problem with that.

  • It was the era of cell phones, and the  footage of the shooting of Walter Scott  

  • was captured by a bystander. Feldin Santana  was terrified of being targeted by police,  

  • but he shared it with Scott's family, who  released it. It showed clearly that Scott  

  • had never laid hands on Slager's taser and  was shot in the back without provocation.  

  • Mass protests came to North Charleston, and  Slager was fired and charged with murder.  

  • While the first case deadlocked when one juror  wouldn't vote to convict, he was charged and  

  • pled guilty to federal civil rights charges  and is currently doing twenty years in prison.

  • It wasn't the only time police tried to cover  up a killing, and the next one went much higher.

  • The year was 1975 in Montgomery, Alabamaand it seemed like an open-and-shut case.  

  • Police were searching the neighborhood  for a suspect in a grocery store robbery,  

  • and they zeroed in on Bernard Whitehurst  Jr. When they confronted him, Whitehurst  

  • reportedly pulled a gun and aimed it  at the officers. They returned fire,  

  • killing him with a single bullet to the chestThe shooting was quickly deemed justified when  

  • a gun was found at the scene, there was  no autopsy, and Whitehurst was quickly  

  • buried. It seemed like an open-and-shut  case like so many other police shootings.

  • It wasn't, and six months later  the entire case started to unravel.

  • The Montgomery Advisor was one of the only  newspapers to cover the case extensively  

  • and allege that the gun was planted, and many  locals were starting to question the events.  

  • The police alleged that the paper was making up  stories, and their publisher even agreed to take  

  • a polygraph test. Three Montgomery officers  were eventually charged with perjury over the  

  • planted gun, and offered a chance to take  a polygraph test to prove their innocence.  

  • They all resigned from the force instead. While no  one was ever charged in the shooting and no one is  

  • exactly sure what happened in the moments that led  to Bernard Whitehurst Jr.'s death, the conspiracy  

  • led to the resignation of eight officers and  several Montgomery officials including the Mayor.

  • There's a third type of planted evidenceInstead of trying to solve or cover up crimes,  

  • this officer tried to create them.

  • For those who were stopped by  Deputy Zachary Wester in Florida,  

  • a traffic stop quickly turned to horrorHe would pull them over, question them,  

  • and then make up a reason to search the carHe would quickly find drugs, usually meth,  

  • and make a quick arrest. The people would go into  the system and many saw jail time or lost jobs or  

  • custody of their children. Over several yearsWester seemed to have an uncanny ability to stop  

  • cars whose drivers were carrying small amounts  of drugs. This was a great asset for a policeman,  

  • and anyone who watched him work was  sure he was headed for a promotion soon.

  • It was all a lie.

  • Zachary Wester was planting the drugs on  unsuspecting people, and footage shows them  

  • react with shock and horror when it's pulled out  seemingly from thin air. While only eleven victims  

  • were initially found, prosecutors dropped overhundred cases involving Wester and were reviewing  

  • over two hundred. Eight people were released from  prison and Wester was charged with racketeering,  

  • false imprisonment, official misconduct, andhost of other charges. Prosecutors were showing  

  • no mercy, and Wester wasn't offered a plea dealHe's currently awaiting trial and could face over  

  • thirty years in prison if convicted - and he's  probably lucky his victims were already released.

  • The next case set a record the  Government wasn't happy about.

  • It was one of the most shocking crimes in the  history of Waukegan, Illinois. In August 1992,  

  • a woman called police and reported  that her home had been broken into  

  • and her children's 11-year-old babysitterHolly Slaker, was missing. When police arrived,  

  • they found the girl's body in the housestabbed to death. Evidence of rape was found,  

  • samples were taken, and a massive manhunt began.  A prison informant fingered a fellow inmate,  

  • Puerto Rico-born Juan Rivera. Rivera cooperated  with the investigation and gave samples of his  

  • blood and DNA. While no physical evidence  was found on site linking him to the crime,  

  • Rivera was held in custody where his  mental condition began to deteriorate.

  • His long nightmare was only beginning.

  • Rivera was interrogated until he confessed, even  though many Detectives stated his comments were  

  • inconsistent with the crime scene. He was quickly  charged with first-degree murder and convicted,  

  • despite evidence from his electronic  ankle monitor showing that he hadn't  

  • left the home on the night of the murderWhile his first conviction was overturned,  

  • his fate was sealed at his second trial by the  testimony of the child being babysat- who was only  

  • two at the time. It wasn't until 2004 when  DNA testing cast doubt on his guilt that he  

  • saw the chance at freedom - but prosecutors  were determined to try him again. They had a  

  • bizarre theory that he could have still been  guilty due to cross-contamination and even  

  • claimed that Slaker had been sexually  active, contaminating the crime scene.

  • Shockingly, Rivera was convicted  again and all hope seemed lost.

  • It was 2011 when the courts issuedscathing condemnation of the initial trial,  

  • pointing out all the flaws. Not only  did they overturn Rivera's conviction,  

  • but they barred the prosecution from  trying him again. The prosecution had even  

  • tried to enter shoes as evidence that weren't  available for sale at the time of the murder.  

  • The many legal flaws and lies in the proceedings  led to Rivera winning the biggest settlement  

  • for wrongful conviction in United States  history at the time - twenty million dollars.

  • The next case's criminal cop  didn't commit his crimes alone.

  • Sgt. Wayne Jenkins was a prominent officer  in the Baltimore Police Department,  

  • the head of the Gun Trace Task Force. So when  one of his suspects wound up dead, run over by  

  • Jenkins' car while being arrested, most officers  gave him the benefit of the doubt. He claimed  

  • that the suspect had pointed a gun at the carwhich turned out to be a BB gun, and that gave  

  • him the authority to take out the suspect by any  means necessary. But all of this started falling  

  • apart when Jenkins was arrested and convicted for  a host of crimes committed using his position of  

  • power including robberies and dealing drugsAll his past cases started being investigated.

  • And the truth about the incident  with his car was blown wide open.

  • Not only did the suspect not have a gun  on him, but Jenkins didn't act alone.  

  • He called up two other officersKeith Gladstone and Carmine Vignola,  

  • and asked them to bring a gun from their  own car to the scene. The two officers  

  • worked together to stage the crime scene. When  federal investigators looked into the case as  

  • part of a massive scandal involving Jenkins' task  force, the two officers were exposed and wound  

  • up receiving prison sentences. As for Jenkins, he  was headed for a twenty-five year stay in prison,  

  • where many of the people he had convicted  were likely not so happy to see him.

  • The truth usually comes to light  - but sometimes it's too late.

  • It was 1940 in County Tipperary, Ireland,  

  • and the central-Irish town was about to be  rocked by a shocking murder. Mary McCarthy,  

  • also known as Moll, was an unmarried woman with  seven children by six fathers who made a living  

  • off sex work. Her controversial profession  led to her home being targeted for arson,  

  • but everyone was still shocked when she turned up  dead, found with two gunshot wounds to her head  

  • delivered by the nephew of her landlord. Harry  Gleeson was suspected of being the father of her  

  • youngest child, and suspicion soon fell on him. He  claimed innocence, but he was quickly charged and  

  • convicted. Justice was swift in those days, and  Gleeson was hung only six months after the murder.

  • That was far from the end of the story.

  • Sean McBride, Gleeson's lawyer, didn't give  up the fight after his client was executed.  

  • Decades later, a friend of Gleeson's put together  a book detailing all the flaws in the case.  

  • Among them, the murder happened on a date when  Gleeson had an alibi, the landlord wasn't called  

  • as a witness, and the local Garda engineered  a false confrontation between Gleeson and two  

  • of McCarthy's children. They had even failed to  enter the local shotgun register into evidence,  

  • which could have helped Gleeson's caseThe suppression of the register and the  

  • alibi was enough, and the President of Ireland  issued a posthumous pardon to Gleeson in 2013.

  • The next case nearly took down an  entire major police department.

  • New York State Trooper David L. Harding was an  ambitious man, and he was looking to move up  

  • to the CIA. When he was asked in an interview if  he was willing to break the law for his country,  

  • he didn't wait - he answered yes and proudly  announced that he had fabricated evidence  

  • to convict people he knew were guilty  as an officer. The CIA wasn't pleased.  

  • They notified the Justice Department  and an investigation began - and what  

  • they found was shocking. In Central New  York, a massive conspiracy of fraudulent  

  • convictions and falsified evidence  had been taking place for years.

  • It had even ruined people's lives.

  • Two false murder convictions were quickly  uncovered. One man, John Spencer, had been booked  

  • into a police precinct. The police then lifted  his fingerprints off surfaces in the precinct  

  • and attached them to evidence cards, using  that to convict him of murder. Another suspect,  

  • Shirley Kinge, was convicted of burglary and  arson in a horrible quadruple-murder case  

  • that her son was implicated in. While she did  possess a stolen credit card from the home,  

  • the evidence against her was mainly falsified  fingerprints. Not only did what came to be known  

  • as the New York Police Troop C Scandal lead to  five officers being charged and three convicted,  

  • but every conviction involving  the unit had to be reinvestigated.

  • For more on shocking police behavior, check  outWeird Times Police Arrested Kids”,  

  • or watchThis Happens to Drugs Confiscated  By Policefor an in-depth look at the system.

The police have the suspect dead to rightsThey say they've interrogated him for hours,  

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Shocking Cases of Cops Planting Evidence

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    林宜悉 posted on 2021/01/23
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