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  • Germany has recorded more than 50,000 coronavirus deaths since the start of the pandemic.

  • That number has risen sharply over recent weeks, even as infection figures air finally declining.

  • Hundreds of deaths, sometimes more than 1000 have been reported daily across Germany over recent weeks.

  • In some parts of the country, intensive care units and crematoriums have reached their limit.

  • The situation has prompted the German government toe once again extend the country's locked down.

  • Germany's health minister, Jens Spahn, has been giving an update alongside health officials.

  • He says the coronavirus case numbers are encouraging but still too high.

  • The third vaccination program is giving us hope in the current situation through crisis is at its peak, but we're beginning to leave the pandemic behind us.

  • I made you feel that this is not happening quickly enough.

  • I would also like to have more vaccine doses available so that more people can be immunized.

  • Let's bring in our correspondent Jared Read, who's following the latest on the story for us.

  • Hi, Jared.

  • We mentioned that grim number 50,000 deaths here in Germany bring us up to speed on the situation.

  • That's right.

  • So me, very sadly 50,000 over 50,000 people have now died from or or off covert 19 in Germany.

  • They have bean around 2.1 million cases so far, but there is encouraging news in so far is that infection rates are on a steady decline.

  • As they stand today, the infection rate is 115 per 100,000 of population over a seven day period.

  • As I say, that number has bean steadily declining, but not fast enough, which is why the government and the states agreed earlier this week to extend current restrictions until February the 14th.

  • This shots down continues to shut down large parts off public life like schools and daycares shops.

  • Azaz well, and they are encouraging MAWR medical mask wearing.

  • And there is going to be an obligation on employers to make sure that mawr of their employees work from home so that the infection risk in offices is reduced on also on public transport.

  • The big worry at the moment is thes mutations that are starting to be seen in Germany.

  • There have been isolated cases off them, and health authorities really want don't want these mutations to become dominant here well, those health authorities have been speaking to journalists today.

  • It tell us more about what they've been saying.

  • That's right.

  • We've just been hearing from a lot Avila, who's the head of the Robert Koch Institut, which is Germany's infectious diseases body.

  • He has been saying that there are 16,000 nursing homes in Germany and currently off those 16,900 are experiencing quite serious covert 19 outbreaks.

  • And he's saying the ones that are doing better are the ones that have the resources and expertise to to manage the situation, and he hopes that those that aren't managing it so well, we'll get the resources like staffing that they need.

  • He's saying that people over 80 continue to be a significant risk group here in Germany, too, And Jared Howard, Germans taking all of this.

  • The extended restrictions largely they're supportive.

  • A recent polling shows that around 40% off people surveyed here in Germany were for significant significant hardening off restrictions.

  • Around 20% wanted them to stay as they are, but by and large consistently over the last few months we've seen that public support for restrictions here is has been consistently high.

  • Our political correspondent Jared Read.

  • Thank you.

  • Now, the number of new cases in England has dropped from a peak of nearly 70,000 per day in the first week of January to just under 40,000 on Thursday.

  • But the UK has recorded MAWR deaths per capita than any other country in the world, and the number continues to rise.

  • Hospitals up and down the country are being stretched to their limits.

  • We want to warn our viewers you might find some of these images disturbing.

  • This woman, in her mid twenties is fighting for survival.

  • Intensive care units have reached their limit.

  • The doctors air volunteers from other units of this London hospital.

  • They breathe a sigh of relief.

  • The patient is stable for now, she's young, she's someone's relative.

  • This is something precious that we're holding and we're trying to do.

  • Um, yeah, it's quite frightening.

  • 12 of the hospitals, 15 floors are filled with Corona patients.

  • Doctors tried desperately to find beds for new admissions.

  • He's got, He's got co vid, and he's had a stroke.

  • One bed has become available.

  • Up until an hour ago, Hannah Freeborn lay in it.

  • She was a mother, a grandmother and just 64.

  • I wish this on anybody.

  • This is really is horrible.

  • It's riel.

  • The Corona mutation from the south of England is clearly more contagious.

  • A strict lock down since the start of January has done little to reduce the number of new infections.

  • We've got to observe the lock down the stay at home message that's absolutely crucial in in what is unquestionably going to be a tough few weeks ahead.

  • The flood of patients is not expected to ease, and the death toll remains high.

  • The results of a coronavirus mutation that is out of control.

  • Let's go to London now.

  • Our correspondent Birgit Maas is standing by for us.

  • They're hyper get.

  • How bad is the situation right now in the UK?

  • It's pretty bad.

  • Almost 100,000 people 100,000 people have died because of the virus.

  • And as it was explained and report, many hospitals don't know where to put the patients.

  • They're really running out of beds, and the problem is the new variant off the coronavirus, which is quite prevalent in London and the Southeast.

  • But it has also been traveling across the country on this new strain is very difficult for the authorities to get under control and on.

  • People that I know that are vulnerable are quite frightened, frightened, and I have one friend who was always very pragmatic.

  • She's vulnerable, but now she's really shielding completely.

  • So people are taking this very, very seriously and the government?

  • The environment minister now says that the government is considering a full closure of borders.

  • What can you tell us about that?

  • This is something that's being debated in the UK I think the context is actually when the situation gets better in the UK, but we know that other countries across the world might be still struggling with new variants.

  • So in the UK, what has been successful is the vaccination program over 7% off the population have now received at least wanders off one of the vaccine.

  • So that is, um in the international comparison is really quite high, particularly in the European context, and now the government are thinking off how to protect their own country.

  • So once the UK has gotten this virus better under control, But in other countries there might be new variants.

  • How how can they protect the UK so it's being discussed.

  • Possibly Thio have government accommodation for for travelers that are coming into the UK or electronic tagging, or MAWR, closing off the borders and tougher border restrictions for a while.

  • This is being debated at the moment and you know, you said the situation is pretty bad.

  • The virus is spreading.

  • Hospitals are overwhelmed.

  • How are people in London coping right now?

  • Well, people are definitely scared.

  • So when I walk through the streets of London, the streets are pretty empty.

  • You don't see a lot of people congregating on.

  • Most people know some no other people who have had, uh covered.

  • Obviously, a lot of people have it on day get better.

  • But you know, some people know people who have died, so it is very real.

  • It's a It's a very real threat.

  • Now there is light at the end of the tunnel with a new with the vaccination.

  • So I think people are just hoping for the best that within a few months, really, that the situation will be better.

  • But definitely the next weeks are going to be tough because the hospitals are so over overwhelmed and that is not going to change any time soon.

  • BERGEN, Mass.

  • For us in London.

  • Thank you.

  • The rate of new infections in Israel remains high as the country battles a third wave of infections.

  • But at the same time, Israel is vaccinating people faster than anywhere else.

  • The government says all Israeli citizens will be inoculated by the end of March.

  • Israel was able to move fast after securing a special but also controversial deal with the vaccine manufacturer.

  • BIOTECH Pfizer This basketball stadium in Tel Aviv is now a vaccination center.

  • People under the age of 35 are already being immunized here, while older residents are getting their second jab.

  • The vaccines are being administered in record time.

  • By in tech, Pfizer is delivering millions of doses.

  • In return, the pharma companies are receiving valuable data that allows them to measure the efficacy of their product.

  • E don't have a problem with the data agreement on.

  • I don't feel like I'm part of an experiment were leading the world on vaccinations, and Israel offers the right kind of infrastructure.

  • It's Israel's healthcare system with its universal insurance that makes the country so interesting to buy intact.

  • Pfizer insurance companies allocate doctors to patients streamlining the vaccination program.

  • The digitalized and centralized nature of data collection has created a treasure trove of readily available information.

  • If one wants to understand how a really world rollout off the vaccine program impacts public health, then Israel with a digital health repositories and it's very strong methodological capabilities and it's, ah, very good outreach off public health and clinical health toe all of the citizens is probably an ideal place to do that.

  • The main objective is to find out at what stage the vaccination drive achieves herd immunity and to figure out ways to get there fast.

  • The data used in the research has been made anonymous, but that hasn't stopped critics from sounding the alarm.

  • People are saying, What's the problem with Animal Anonymous data?

  • And the problem is that anonymous data medical data today can be transferred to be non anonymous.

  • If you have the right tools and the right technology, we wanna have a kind of an oversight experts that will make sure that this data is not going to be exploited later by third parties.

  • Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has emphasized that the findings will benefit the rest of the world, but his prime focus is the impact that the vaccination program is having an Israel itself way will be the first country to defeat the pandemic thing.

  • Deal I have struck with Pfizer allows us to vaccinate everyone above 16 by the end of March.

  • Hats off meds.

  • The ambitious target coincides with parliamentary elections, which Netanyahu is hoping to win.

  • But while the number of vaccinations air shooting up, so too are infections a race against time that Israel is determined to win.

Germany has recorded more than 50,000 coronavirus deaths since the start of the pandemic.

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Germany surpasses 50,000 COVID death, UK crosses 90,000 | Coronavirus Latest

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    林宜悉 posted on 2021/01/22
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