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  • Day 17 is here. It's our 30 Day English Vocabulary  Challenge to start 2021 right. We're learning 105  

  • words from the academic word list, words that will  help you have sophisticated English conversations,  

  • words you'll need to know if you're preparing for  the IELTS or TOEFL exams. I've been watching the  

  • posts you've been making about this challengeit's incredible, inspiring. Make up a sentence  

  • to a word you learn, and post it on social. Don't  forget to like and subscribe and don't forget to  

  • download the study guide that goes with this 30  day challenge. You can do that by clicking here  

  • or the link in the video description. Learn  the words, ace the quizzes, you've got this.

  • Our first word today is DERIVE.

  • Derive. A two-syllable word with second syllable  stress. Let's talk about how this word is  

  • different from drive, D-R-I-V-E. Derive. DriveThe difference is pretty subtle, isn't it? Derive.  

  • Drive. The unstressed syllable is so short, it  can almost sound like drive, as in drive a car,  

  • but you do want a D releasing into an IH vowel  even if it's short. Dih dih dih-- Derive. Derive.  

  • In the other word, drive, since there's no  vowel between D and R, we have a DR cluster,  

  • and it's very common to pronounce DR as JR. So  rather than drive, it's more common to hear that  

  • drive. Jjj-- Do you hear that J soundDrive. You won't hear that in derive  

  • because there is a quick vowel between theand the R. Derive. Drive. Derive is a verb,  

  • it means to take or get something from something  else, to come from something. The river derives  

  • its name from a Native American tribe. Let's  look again up close and in slow motion.

  • And now we'll go to Youglish for five examples.

  • What advantage does he derive from doing that.

  • Derive an advantage, get  something good for himself by  

  • doing that. He's getting something  that he wants by taking some action.

  • What advantage does he derive from doing that.

  • Here's another example.

  • Do you derive inspiration from Ella?

  • Derive inspiration.  

  • Do you feel excited to do something  because of her? Do you get inspired by her?

  • Do you derive inspiration from Ella?

  • Here's another example.

  • The Math to do this takes a while to derive.

  • Takes a while to derive. In Math, this word  means to obtain something from something else,  

  • to get a function or equation from another  sequence, for example, by differentiation.  

  • this probably won't mean much to you  if you haven't done higher level Math,  

  • but the core of the definition is the  same, to get something from something else.

  • The Math to do this takes a while to derive.

  • Another example.

  • If you're an extrovert, you derive  energy from being around other people.

  • Which one are you? An extrovert who  gets energy from being around people,  

  • or an introvert who gets energy from being  alone? Where do you derive or get your energy?

  • I myself am an introvert. I have  to have down time by myself.

  • If you're an extrovert, you derive  energy from being around other people.

  • Our last example.

  • I find I derive far more pleasure and satisfaction  

  • when I share with others than  when I hoard something for myself.

  • Sharing is the opposite of  hoarding. If you hoard something,  

  • you're keeping it for yourself. I'm sure  most of us would say the same as this guy.  

  • We can get more pleasure or happiness  when we share than when we don't.

  • I find I derive far more pleasure and satisfaction  

  • when I share with others than  when I hoard something for myself.

  • Our next word is INDICATE. Indicate. It's a  verb, it means to show something, to direct  

  • attention to something, often by pointing. The  map indicates where the treasure is buried.  

  • Let's look again up close and in slow motion.

  • And now, we'll go to Youglish for five examples.

  • You had to indicate where you  lived, what your occupation was.

  • She's probably using indicate to  mean fill out a form or check a box,  

  • to show where you live, and  what type of work you do.  

  • Indicate here means report, or to write  down something, to show something.

  • You had to indicate where you  lived, what your occupation was.

  • Here's another example.

  • The experience someone has is they  

  • indicate what they want to learn and then  the system starts to pitch questions at them.

  • He's talking about using software to learnFirst, you indicate what you want to know,  

  • you show the computer what your interests are,  

  • you click a button or you type inphrase, then the software starts to  

  • pitch questions. It asks you more questions  based on what you indicated at the start.

  • The experience someone has is they  

  • indicate what they want to learn and then  the system starts to pitch questions at them.

  • Here's another example.

  • He has a series of symbols,  

  • black symbols on white slates, that are  supposed to indicate individual behaviors.

  • The man in the photo is training dolphins  how to read. The black and white symbols  

  • that he shows the dolphins tells them  or indicates what he wants them to do.  

  • For example, jump, go get something, and so on.

  • He has a series of symbolsblack symbols on white slates,  

  • that are supposed to indicate  individual behaviors.

  • Another example.

  • The colors on these maps indicate how fast carbon  was taken in for every square meter of land.

  • The colors indicate. The colors show or  illustrate. Indicate is a great word to use  

  • when you need to explain a graph  an image or any set of data.  

  • What does the information  indicate? What does it teach us?

  • The colors on these maps indicate how fast carbon  was taken in for every square meter of land.

  • Our last example.

  • And the political system, as you  indicate, has failed to deliver.

  • Indicate is also a synonym for say or explainThe man across the table from the speaker  

  • said that the political system has failed in  some way. He indicated that, he said that.

  • And the political system, as you  indicate, has failed to deliver.

  • Our last word today is PRINCIPLE. Principle. This  word is a homophone, that means it sounds the same  

  • as this word. The other word, principal, means  the chief or head of something. In America, we use  

  • it for schools. Each school has a principal, the  head of the school. But on the academic word list,  

  • it's this word, principle. As a noun, it meansmoral rule or belief that helps you know what's  

  • right and wrong, and influences your actions. A  basic truth or theory, a law or fact of nature.  

  • It's against my principles to cheat. As an  adjective, it means very important or basic.  

  • My principle belief is not to cheat. Let's  look again up close and in slow motion.

  • And now, we'll go to Youglish for five examples.

  • And the last principle I'll talk to you  about, um, is called look up not down.

  • Here, principle means piece of  advice or belief. He's speaking  

  • to a group of Google employees  about the power of being yourself.  

  • So his talk is outlined by principles or moral  rules that can help people be themselves.

  • And the last principle I'll talk to  you about is called look up not down.

  • Here's another example.

  • So if we can do this in  animals, we can already see,  

  • in principle, a path towards  doing this in human patients.

  • 'In principle' is a common phrase. It's  like saying in theory, or because of this,  

  • we think that. She's talking about testing  medicines on animals as a way to find a  

  • theory or fact of nature that can help scientists  know how to use the same medicines with people.

  • So if we can do this in  animals, we can already see,  

  • in principle, a path towards  doing this in human patients.

  • Here's another example.

  • What is in your mind the principle  obstacle that you have to overcome.

  • Here's a use of principle as a modifier.

  • The principle obstacle is the most  important obstacle, the thing that  

  • is standing in the way of reaching your  goal, the biggest challenge to get past.

  • What is in your mind the principle  obstacle that you have to overcome?

  • Another example.

  • Lastly and the most imp-- important  principle of them all, is passion.

  • The usage of principle here is the first  definition we looked at, belief. What's one  

  • of your most important personal principles? What  beliefs affect how you act and make decisions?

  • Lastly and the most imp-- important  principle of them all, is passion.

  • Our last example.

  • And while they're very different in many ways,  

  • they, they do kind of operate  on the same principle.

  • In the same principle, or by the same principleHe means the organizations work under the same  

  • guidelines or rules. This is true for  franchises across the world like Starbucks.  

  • Each location is a little different  from the others, but overall,  

  • every Starbucks operates by  the same basic principles.

  • And while they're very different in many ways,  

  • they, they do kind of operate  on the same principle.

  • Seeing all the real-life examples can really help  you understand how to use these words, can't it?  

  • I have a challenge for you now. Make  up a sentence with one of these words.  

  • Make a short video of your sentenceand post it to social media.  

  • Tag me and use the hashtag  #rachelsenglish30daychallenge

  • Don't be shy. You can do this. I love seeing  

  • what you've posted so far. Our next  video comes out tomorrow, at 10 AM  

  • Philadelphia time. Come on back to learn  three more vocabulary words. In the meantime,  

  • keep your studies going with this video, and check  out my online courses at Rachel's English Academy.  

  • You'll become a more confident English  speaker. And please do remember to subscribe.  

  • I love being your English teacher. That's it  and thanks so much for using Rachel's English.

Day 17 is here. It's our 30 Day English Vocabulary  Challenge to start 2021 right. We're learning 105  

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B1 principle drive obstacle hoard extrovert math

LEARN 105 ENGLISH VOCABULARY WORDS | DAY 17

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    Summer posted on 2021/01/21
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