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  • The Power of Concentration, by Theron Q. Dumont INTRODUCTORY

  • We all know that in order to accomplish a certain thing we must

  • concentrate. It is of the utmost value to learn how to

  • concentrate. To make a success of anything you must be able to

  • concentrate your entire thought upon the idea you are working

  • out. Do not become discouraged, if you are unable

  • to hold your thought on the subject very long at first. There are

  • very few that can. It seems a peculiar fact that it is easier

  • to concentrate on something that is not good for us, than on

  • something that is beneficial. This tendency is overcome when

  • we learn to concentrate consciously.

  • If you will just practice a few concentration exercises each day

  • you will find you will soon develop this wonderful power.

  • Success is assured when you are able to concentrate for you are

  • then able to utilize for your good all constructive thoughts and

  • shut out all the destructive ones. It is of the greatest value to

  • be able to think only that which will be beneficial. Did you ever stop to think what an important

  • part your thoughts, concentrated thoughts, play in your life?

  • This book shows their far-reaching and all-abiding effects.

  • These lessons you will find very practical. The exercises I have

  • thoroughly tested. They are arranged so that you will notice an

  • improvement from the very start, and this will give you

  • encouragement. They point out ways in which you can help

  • yourself. Man is a wonderful creature, but he must be

  • trained and developed to be useful. A great work can be accomplished

  • by every man if he can be awakened to do his very best. But the

  • greatest man would not accomplish much if he lacked concentration

  • and effort. Dwarfs can often do the work of giants when they

  • are transformed by the almost magic power of great mental concentration.

  • But giants will only do the work of dwarfs when they lack

  • this power. We accomplish more by concentration than by

  • fitness; the man that is apparently best suited for a place does

  • not always fill it best. It is the man that concentrates on its

  • every possibility that makes an art of both his work and his

  • life. All your real advancement must come from your

  • individual effort. This course of lessons will stimulate and

  • inspire you to achieve success; it will bring you into perfect harmony

  • with the laws of success. It will give you a firmer hold on

  • your duties and responsibilities.

  • The methods of thought concentration given in this work if put

  • into practice will open up interior avenues that will connect you

  • with the everlasting laws of Being and their exhaustless

  • foundation of unchangeable truth. As most people are very different it is impossible

  • to give instructions that will be of the same value

  • to all. The author has endeavored in these lessons to awaken

  • that within the soul which perhaps the book does not express. So

  • study these lessons as a means of awakening and training that

  • which is within yourself. Let all your acts and thoughts have

  • the intensity and power of concentration.

  • To really get the full benefit of these lessons you should read a

  • page, then close the book and thoughtfully recall its ideas. If

  • you will do this you will soon cultivate a concentrated mental

  • habit, which will enable you to read with ordinary rapidity and

  • remember all that you read.

  • LESSON I. CONCENTRATION FINDS THE WAY

  • Everyone has two natures. One wants us to advance and the other

  • wants to pull us back. The one that we cultivate and concentrate

  • on decides what we are at the end. Both natures are trying toa

  • gain control. The will alone decides the issue. A man by one

  • supreme effort of the will may change his whole career and almost

  • accomplish miracles. You may be that man. You can be if you Will

  • to be, for Will can find a way or make one. I could easily fill a book, of cases where

  • men plodding along in a matter-of-fact way, were all at once aroused

  • and as if awakening from a slumber they developed the

  • possibilities within them and from that time on were different

  • persons. You alone can decide when the turning point will come. It

  • is a matter of choice whether we allow our diviner self to control

  • us or whether we will be controlled by the brute within us.

  • No man has to do anything he does not want to do. He is therefore

  • the director of his life if he wills to be. What we are to

  • do, is the result of our training. We are like putty, and can be

  • completely controlled by our will power.

  • Habit is a matter of acquirement. You hear people say: "He comes

  • by this or that naturally, a chip off the old block," meaning

  • that he is only doing what his parents did. This is quite often

  • the case, but there is no reason for it, for a person can break a

  • habit just the moment he masters the "I will." A man may have

  • been a "good-for-nothing" all his life up to this very minute,

  • but from this time on he begins to amount to something. Even old

  • men have suddenly changed and accomplished wonders. "I lost my

  • opportunity," says one. That may be true, but by sheer force of

  • will, we can find a way to bring us another opportunity. There is

  • no truth in the saying that opportunity knocks at our door but

  • once in a lifetime. The fact is, opportunity never seeks us; we

  • must seek it. What usually turns out to be one man's opportunity,

  • was another man's loss. In this day one man's brain is matched

  • against another's. It is often the quickness of brain action that

  • determines the result. One man thinks "I will do it," but while

  • he procrastinates the other goes ahead and does the work. They

  • both have the same opportunity. The one will complain of his lost

  • chance. But it should teach him a lesson, and it will, if he is

  • seeking the path that leads to success. Many persons read good books, but say they

  • do not get much good out of them. They do not realize that all

  • any book or any lesson course can do is to awaken them to their possibilities;

  • to stimulate them to use their will power. You

  • may teach a person from now until doom's day, but that person

  • will only know what he learns himself. "You can lead him to the fountain,

  • but you can't make him drink."

  • One of the most beneficial practices I know of is that of looking

  • for the good in everyone and everything, for there is good in all

  • things. We encourage a person by seeing his good qualities and we

  • also help ourselves by looking for them. We gain their good

  • wishes, a most valuable asset sometimes. We get back what we give

  • out. The time comes when most all of us need encouragement; need

  • buoying up. So form the habit of encouraging others, and you will

  • find it a wonderful tonic for both those encouraged and yourself,

  • for you will get back encouraging and uplifting thoughts.

  • Life furnishes us the opportunity to improve. But whether we do

  • it or not depends upon how near we live up to what is expected of

  • us. The first of each month, a person should sit down and examine

  • the progress he has made. If he has not come up to "expectations"

  • he should discover the reason, and by extra exertion measure up

  • to what is demanded next time. Every time that we fall behind

  • what we planned to do, we lose just so much for that time is gone

  • forever. We may find a reason for doing it, but most excuses are

  • poor substitutes for action. Most things are possible. Ours may

  • be a hard task, but the harder the task, the greater the reward.

  • It is the difficult things that really develop us, anything that

  • requires only a small effort, utilizes very few of our faculties,

  • and yields a scanty harvest of achievement. So do not shrink from

  • a hard task, for to accomplish one of these will often bring us

  • more good than a dozen lesser triumphs. I know that every man that is willing to pay

  • the price can be a success. The price is not in money, but in

  • effort. The first essential quality for success is the desire

  • to do--to be something. The next thing is to learn how

  • to do it; the next to carry it into execution. The man that is the

  • best able to accomplish anything is the one with a broad

  • mind; the man that has acquired knowledge, that may, it is true,

  • be foreign to this particular case, but is, nevertheless, of

  • some value in all cases. So the man that wants to be successful

  • must be liberal; he must acquire all the knowledge that he can;

  • he must be well posted not only in one branch of his business

  • but in every part of it. Such a man achieves success.

  • The secret of success is to try always to improve yourself no

  • matter where you are or what your position. Learn all you can.

  • Don't see how little you can do, but how much you can do. Such a

  • man will always be in demand, for he establishes the reputation

  • of being a hustler. There is always room for him because

  • progressive firms never let a hustler leave their employment if

  • they can help it. The man that reaches the top is the gritty,

  • plucky, hard worker and never the timid, uncertain, slow worker.

  • An untried man is seldom put in a position of responsibility

  • and power. The man selected is one that has done something, achieved

  • results in some line, or taken the lead in his department.

  • He is placed there because of his reputation of putting vigor

  • and virility into his efforts, and because he has previously shown

  • that he has pluck and determination.

  • The man that is chosen at the crucial time is not usually a

  • genius; he does not possess any more talent than others, but he

  • has learned that results can only be produced by untiring

  • concentrated effort. That "miracles," in business do not just

  • "happen." He knows that the only way they will happen is by

  • sticking to a proposition and seeing it through. That is the only

  • secret of why some succeed and others fail. The successful man

  • gets used to seeing things accomplished and always feels sure of

  • success. The man that is a failure gets used to seeing failure,

  • expects it and attracts it to him. It is my opinion that with the right kind

  • of training every man could be a success. It is really a shame that

  • so many men and women, rich in ability and talent, are allowed

  • to go to waste, so to speak. Some day I hope to see a millionaire

  • philanthropist start a school for the training of failures.

  • I am sure he could not put his money to a better use. In a year's

  • time the science of practical psychology could do wonders for

  • him. He could have agencies on the lookout for men that had lost

  • their grip on themselves; that had through indisposition

  • weakened their will; that through some sorrow or misfortune had

  • become discouraged. At first all they need is a little help to get

  • them back on their feet, but usually they get a knock downwards

  • instead. The result is that their latent powers never develop

  • and both they and the world are the losers. I trust that in the

  • near future, someone will heed the opportunity of using some of

  • his millions in arousing men that have begun to falter. All

  • they need to be shown is that there is within them an omnipotent

  • source that is ready to aid them, providing they will make use

  • of it. Their minds only have to be turned from despair to hope to

  • make them regain their hold.

  • When a man loses his grip today, he must win his redemption by

  • his own will. He will get little encouragement or advice of an

  • inspiring nature. He must usually regain the right road alone. He

  • must stop dissipating his energies and turn his attention to

  • building a useful career. Today we must conquer our weakening

  • tendencies alone. Don't expect anyone to help you. Just take one

  • big brace, make firm resolutions, and resolve to conquer your

  • weaknesses and vices. Really none can do this for you. They can

  • encourage you; that is all. I can think of nothing, but lack of health,

  • that should interfere with one becoming successful. There is no

  • other handicap that you should not be able to overcome. To overcome

  • a handicap, all that it is necessary to do is to use more determination

  • and grit and will.

  • The man with grit and will, may be poor today and wealthy in a

  • few years; will power is a better asset than money; Will will

  • carry you over chasms of failure, if you but give it the chance.

  • The men that have risen to the highest positions have usually had

  • to gain their victories against big odds. Think of the hardships

  • many of our inventors have gone through before they became a

  • success. Usually they have been very much misunderstood by

  • relatives and friends. Very often they did not have the bare

  • necessities of life, yet, by sheer determination and resolute

  • courage, they managed to exist somehow until they perfected their

  • inventions, which afterwards greatly helped in bettering the

  • condition of others. Everyone really wants to do something, but

  • there are few that will put forward the needed effort to make

  • the necessary sacrifice to secure it. There is only one

  • way to accomplish anything and that is to go ahead and do it.

  • A man may accomplish almost anything today, if he just sets his

  • heart on doing it and lets nothing interfere with his progress.

  • Obstacles are quickly overcome by the man that sets out to accomplish

  • his heart's desire. The "bigger" the man, the smaller

  • the obstacle appears. The "smaller" the man the greater the obstacle

  • appears. Always look at the advantage you gain by overcoming

  • obstacles, and it will give you the needed courage for their

  • conquest. Do not expect that you will always have easy

  • sailing. Parts of your journey are likely to be rough. Don't

  • let the rough places put you out of commission. Keep on with the

  • journey. Just the way you weather the storm shows what material

  • you are made of. Never sit down and complain of the rough places,

  • but think how nice the pleasant stretches were. View with delight

  • the smooth plains that are in front of you.

  • Do not let a setback stop you. Think of it as a mere incident

  • that has to be overcome before you can reach your goal.

  • LESSON II. THE SELF-MASTERY: SELF-DIRECTION POWER OF

  • CONCENTRATION Man from a psychological standpoint of development

  • is not what he should be. He does not possess the self-mastery,

  • the self-directing power of concentration that

  • is his by right. He has not trained himself in a way to promote

  • his self-mastery. Every balanced mind possesses the faculties

  • whose chief duties are to engineer, direct and concentrate the

  • operations of the mind, both in a mental and physical sense.

  • Man must learn to control not only his mind but his bodily movements.

  • When the controlling faculties (autonomic) are in an untrained

  • condition, the impulses, passions, emotions, thoughts, actions