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  • Hello. Welcome to News Review from BBC Learning English.

  • I'm Tom. Joining me this week is Catherine. Hi Catherine.

  • Hello Tom and hello everybody.

  • Yes, today's story is about travel restrictions

  • that the UK government has recently brought into force.

  • Don't forgetif you want to test yourself on the language from today's episode,

  • we have a quiz on bbclearningenglish.com.

  • Now, let's take a listen to this BBC Radio 4 news report:

  • Yes. So, the UK government is forbidding entry to the UK

  • except if you have been able to provide evidence of a negative Covid test

  • before you start your journeyThey are doing this in an attempt

  • to restrict the movement of new variants of coronavirus.

  • And we have three words and expressions we can use to talk about this story, right?

  • Yes. We have: 'corridors', 'bid' and 'axed'.

  • 'Corridors', 'bid' and 'axed'.

  • Let's take a look. Catherine, can we have your first headline please?

  • Certainly. We are here in the UK for our first headline with Sky Newsthe headline:

  • 'Corridors' – narrow routes.

  • Catherine, what can you tell us about 'corridors'?

  • 'Corridors' is a plural noun, Tom,

  • and the spelling is: C-O-R-R-I-D-O-R-S – 'corridors'. Now..

  • 'Corridors' – narrow routesnow, I thought 'corridors' were something in your house.

  • You're quite right. Most people have a 'corridor' in their house or apartment.

  • It is a narrow kind of hallway; it's just a space that leads to rooms.

  • So, usually long and narrow with lots of doors.

  • Its only purpose is to take you from one part of your house to another part.

  • So, it is another kind of narrow route – a literal one. What is a 'travel corridor' though?

  • Well, a 'travel corridor' is also a route.

  • In this case, a 'travel corridor' – at the momentis an agreement

  • between two countries to allow travel between those countries.

  • We have a lot of places we're not allowed to travel to at the moment

  • because of coronavirus, but if two countries agree

  • yes, you can travel from this country... our country to your country

  • that's known as a 'travel corridor'. It's a narrow route between two countries.

  • So, what the headline is saying is that these travel corridors,

  • these narrow routes between countriesare going to close now, right?

  • Exactly that, yes.

  • OK. So, travel through travel corridors is restricted,

  • but we are not restricted from travelling onto our next section...!

  • So let's... so let's havelook at that slide please:

  • OK. We have another programme about travelling within certain boundaries, don't we?

  • Yes. This one's all about microadventures:

  • small adventures that you've always wanted to have.

  • And you can find out more by just clicking the link.

  • Clicking the link. Perfect.

  • OK. Catherine, can we have a look at your second headline please?

  • And we're still in the UK with The Sunthe headline:

  • 'Bid' – attempt to achieve.

  • Catherine, what can you tell us about 'bid'?

  • 'Bid' is a noun in this headlinealthough it can also be used as a verb.

  • Its spelling, whether it's a noun or a verb, is the same.

  • Simple three-letter word: B-I-D – 'bid'.

  • So, what... so, this 'bid' belongs to the PMwhat's a 'PM' in the headline?

  • Oh yes, 'PM' means 'prime minister'.

  • At the moment the British prime minister is Boris Johnson.

  • So what's the... what's the sort of...

  • what's the article going to talk about from the headline?

  • Well, what we're talking about here in this article is the prime minister's attempt

  • to close the travel corridors and the headline's saying that this might be quite difficult.

  • So, the use of the word 'bidis talking about an effort:

  • an attempt, something he's trying to do.

  • So, would we use this word 'bidas, sort of, a synonym for 'attempt'

  • in kind of normal, day-to-day life?

  • Not so much. You wouldn't say, 'I'm going to make a bid to make a chicken curry tonight.'

  • You would say, 'I'm going to try...'

  • Or a 'bid' to go down the shops...!

  • Yeah, exactly that. So, it's used much more in kind of

  • when we're talking about organisations, important individuals

  • kind of attempts to do majorimportant, significant things.

  • And I think it probably comes up in headlines a lot, as you say,

  • because it's very shortthere's only three letters.

  • One of those words our newspapers absolutely love.

  • Yeah. Are there any collocations or like, you know,

  • regular verbs that we use with this noun 'bid'?

  • Well, you 'make a bid' is a really... a really strong way of saying it.

  • You can 'make a bid to do' something or you can 'make a bid for' something.

  • Kind of like 'make an effort' to do something, right? Similar structure.

  • And there's a... one of my favourite fixed expressions with 'bid'.

  • Let's have it. What is it? You tell me!

  • To 'make a bid for freedom' – do you know this one?

  • Very much so – I do. 'Try to escape': if you try to escape you 'make a bid for freedom'.

  • Yes, my cat 'made a bid for freedom' the other day.

  • She's not allowed out of the front door.

  • She saw me open it and she escaped as fast as she could, but I caught her.

  • Yeah. And probably if... probably if you were in an airport in the UK last weekend,

  • this one just finished, you would be 'making a bid for freedom' –

  • you'd be trying to escape the UK before the travel corridors close.

  • Good example, yes.

  • Thank you very much. OK. Let's make a bid for freedom to get to our next section.

  • So, there are all different kinds of 'bids'.

  • Catherine, you've selectedvideo from the archive, right?

  • Yes, this one is about various countries making 'bids' to host the upcoming Olympic Games.

  • And you can find out more by clicking the link.

  • Catherine, can we have your third headline please?

  • Yes. We're at The Independentstill in the UKthe headline:

  • 'Axed' – cut or reduced without warning.

  • What can you tell us about the word 'axed', Catherine?

  • Yes. 'Axed' – A-X-E-D – lovely pronunciationit's 'axed' with a 'ks-t' at the end.

  • Give it a go, Tom! See how good you are.

  • 'Axe.' 'Axe' – so the '-edis a 't' – so it's 'axed.'

  • 'Axed'. 'Axed'. That's a verbthe verb infinitive is: A-X-E – 'axe'.

  • And 'axe' is also a noun: it refers to a piece – a tool actually

  • that you can use for cutting things. Do you have an axe at home, Tom, at all?

  • I don't here, Catherine, nobecause I live in the middle of London

  • so we don't really need an 'axe', but at home in the countryside, yeah:

  • my dad has an 'axe' – a tool for chopping wood normally.

  • Chopping wood, yeah. So, it's a big... you get a sort of big, long handle

  • with a big, sharp piece of metal at one end

  • and then you grab this handle and you swing the 'axe' behind you

  • and you bring it round really, kind of, aggressively.

  • You hit a tree or a piece of wood with the metal at the end

  • and it breaks into pieces: it's a very, very dramatic action.

  • It's a strong powerful tool: a weaponoftenan axe can be a weapon.

  • So, thisto 'axe' something – means to cut it dramatically.

  • Not just trees: you probably don't 'axe' a treeyou 'cut a tree down' with an axe

  • but if you 'axe' a service, or if you 'axe' jobsor in this case if you 'axe' a travel corridor,

  • you stop it dramatically or you reduce it greatly,

  • and it has a big, big impact and usually with very little warning.

  • That is an excellent explanation there, Catherine.

  • I can hear you getting very, sort of, into the dramatic spirit of axing things...

  • I'm passionate about axes, Tom!

  • But yeah, if you look at the headline as wellif you look at the page

  • you know, it's a black background, it's all capitals:

  • this is... this word 'axe' really makes a statement.

  • It does, yes. And another... that's another reason why newspapers love it.

  • It's a short word and it's a dramatic wordit's much better than 'cut' or 'stop'.

  • And do we have any sort of expressions or wider uses of 'axe'?

  • Yes. We can say if you 'take an axe to something', you cut ityou stop it,

  • you know, violentlydramatically, without warning.

  • So, you could have said that the UK government has 'taken an axe to travel corridors.'

  • And we could use it for other figurative things as well, right?

  • So, we could say, 'Hopefully they're not going to take an axe to News Review,

  • or any of our programmes.'

  • I hope not! I hope not! I'll have nothing to do on Mondays!

  • Hopefully, we will be here with you for some time.

  • OK. Thank you Catherine. Let's get a look at that slide please:

  • OK. Catherine, can you recap today's vocabulary please?

  • Yes. We had: 'corridors' – narrow routes.

  • We had: 'bid' – attempt to achieve.

  • And we had: 'axed' – cut or reduced without warning.

  • Don't forgetif you want to test yourself on the language that we presented today,

  • there is a quiz at bbclearningenglish.com

  • and of course we are all over social media as well.

  • That's it from us for today, so goodbye...

  • Goodbye!

  • ...and see you next time.

Hello. Welcome to News Review from BBC Learning English.

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New UK travel restrictions - News Review

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    林宜悉 posted on 2021/01/20
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