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  • Yeah.

  • Mm hmm.

  • This is what Cove it sounds like this is what cove it looks like.

  • Okay, this is what Kobe does.

  • Well, because co vid overwhelms the body not just of the patient, but that the system around I was around in the first wave.

  • I didn't think anything could beam or challenging than that first wave.

  • And I was absolutely wrong.

  • The volume is staggering.

  • All of a sudden, you've got a lot of patients who are sick with the same set of symptoms.

  • The fact is, we lost control of this for us this winter.

  • We knew it was coming.

  • We've lost control.

  • People are dying because we've lost control of the virus.

  • Have we been managing on the edge?

  • Yes, I think we have.

  • Northwest Park in Northwest London is one of the largest hospitals in the UK.

  • Busy day.

  • Yeah.

  • It's a leading center of medical excellence of every hue.

  • Today, the bulk of its operations are devoted to Cove in 19.

  • Lawrence John and I'm a consultant.

  • Infectious diseases here at North market in the hospital.

  • Like many wards in the hospital, this has been transformed into a covert wars.

  • Yes.

  • How many covert patients you've got in hospital at the moment in the order of 530 or so at the moment again, it's changing Everyday.

  • Got close to 600 last week.

  • So that's almost three quarters.

  • Our patients are covert in this hospital.

  • There are more patients now than there were in March and April.

  • May on def.

  • Those numbers continue then it doesn't matter how good we are looking after Kobe.

  • We'll just run out of beds.

  • We will run out of beds Whatever age you are.

  • For those requiring ventilatory support.

  • If the numbers continue to rise, we will not be able to cope.

  • Hello, there.

  • How you doing?

  • Okay, Thank you.

  • Good.

  • Good.

  • What's your name?

  • Name is gifted Sybil.

  • If that day had come, if that capacity had been breached gifted a 55 year old kara on mother of two would no longer be with it was getting very bad at home.

  • I couldn't stand on my feet.

  • Yeah, from living room today.

  • Although someone has toe hold me, it affect my whole body.

  • Oh, my Children, when they all got it, There are.

  • I told your Children have got it as well.

  • Yeah, my Children so we can God for people in the health system.

  • God bless all of them.

  • It's wonderful.

  • Mhm, thank you.

  • She was very short of breath when she came in.

  • She's being unwell at home for quite a few days, which is very typical with this illness.

  • Um, she couldn't talk in sentences when she came in.

  • We had to give her lots and lots of oxygen.

  • But as I say, fortunately with medicines that we've got the Dexter Method Zone and the antiviral drugs from with the option therapy she's improving so well it's a good sign.

  • How different is it been compared to the first way for you?

  • So I think in the second wave, it's the only good thing about the second wave is that at least we're seeing that the medicines the Dexter Method Zone and the antiviral drugs have been using are starting to make a difference.

  • So we're seeing patients recover that we wouldn't have seen recover in the first wave, so that zoot least reassuring and good for us to see that.

  • So there is some hope there, but it doesn't mean it's a great positive.

  • Thank goodness obviously doesn't also mean, obviously more people are staying in hospital for longer.

  • The pressure is greater on space.

  • Huge pressure on our on our beds At the moment.

  • We're desperately trying to get people better out of hospital as soon as we can.

  • We're doing a good job.

  • We're getting people better.

  • Unfortunately, we're just staying ahead of this at the moment.

  • What about all of the non covert patients?

  • Well, where are they going?

  • It's a terrifying thoughts on what we saw after the first uncontrolled wave of co vid waas mortality from conditions which were not coded cancers, which were diagnosed too late.

  • Heart attacks strokes in my specialty, tuberculosis was presenting a ziff.

  • You were in the tropics, patients presenting with terribly late with tuberculosis.

  • So it's a terrifying thought.

  • What's happening to all the other conditions?

  • There are people who say that the NHS is focusing on covert to the exclusion of all else, and that's bad.

  • It is bad, but it misses the point because right now such are the numbers.

  • Such is the loss of control that they can do no other.

  • There is no choice.

  • Professor Susan Clark is one of the country's leading bowel surgeons.

  • But now and for the foreseeable future, she won't be at the moment.

  • We can't do any other than emergency operating on most of the operations that I do are not emergencies, so I'm not able to operate at the moment.

  • Presumably, some of the people whose operations or procedures are being deferred or treatment is being deferred.

  • How seriously might that be for them?

  • It may be very seriously, How do you feel about that?

  • Um, it feels terrible.

  • But at the same time where I'm working in intensive care and I'm seeing people wave after wave of people coming through the doors of the emergency department here being put onto oxygen, going to the wards, coming to intensive care on those people have to be looked after two.

  • We are overwhelmed by the amount of work that needs to be done on.

  • We are trying to do our best with all of the teams, from the very top to the bottom to try and and get through.

  • You're already dealing with a backlog from the first wave.

  • That's you.

  • That is correct.

  • Yes, we still haven't actually seen all the patients who were referred to us and canceled during the first wave in our patients, the NHS was already very stretched before covert came along.

  • We already had quite significant waiting lists for endoscopy and for surgery.

  • That's what keeps me up at night that way.

  • Have waiting lists that are extended because of this.

  • And we were working through them between the two waves of the pandemic.

  • And it's heartbreaking to be pushed back again.

  • On that they lose their lives.

  • Results.

  • That's the worst case, that potential.

  • That would be the worst case scenario.

  • They have more extended treatment or suboptimal results from that treatment.

  • Mhm.

  • Thank you, President.

  • Okay, Annie is the front of the front line where the volume feels heaviest, where the speed feels quickest.

  • This is where any covert patients will come in, which has come through there.

  • And then we will direct them either into recess here.

  • So it's specifically for coaches alike over patients or suspected Kobe patients will come in.

  • We effectively run to different emergency departments now way.

  • So we got seven days in here.

  • Um so full of the moment of the seven days on bees are for people who have just come in very recent literally these super sick ones.

  • Patients that come in on a blue lights on deal.

  • Bring them straight in here because they're more we're more prepared to hear.

  • There's a large area with all the equipment.

  • It's just a more intense staffing ratio.

  • Right, So this is an empty bay ready to receive the next patient.

  • I can't imagine the empty for long.

  • No, there's one on the way.

  • Is one of the way toe Philip.

  • Just momentarily the phone ringing.

  • Oh, they were right.

  • It didn't take long at all.

  • Oh!

  • Oh, Are you all my You know what you are?

  • You're in the It's terrifying.

  • People get second.

  • Corbett, you having a conversation 10 minutes later?

  • There anything emergency life saving procedures, decision people we're used to seeing have underlying conditions or have been involved in an accident or something that is unexpected.

  • And something like this is totally different to what we're used to managing.

  • So, you know, we're getting people that seem to just you and I coming in on bond.

  • They can't breathe and they're going off to the intensive care unit we saw crammed 12 months of emerging medicine into like four weeks.

  • So the amount of time that you would do CPR in two years, you might do in a month.

  • The maritime, the heather on the sisters were for people to get bad news.

  • What you do in a year you're doing in two or three days, the whole year has been maybe fear for you the most medicine in one year.

  • That's that's what's been part for the staff.

  • Okay?

  • Yeah.

  • Okay.

  • Mhm.

  • Yes.

  • Trish, how many people have you got in here at the moment?

  • So I think you've got 26 ft 26.

  • The president on this is your only like to you order floor.

  • And we've got another Florence civil, right?

  • Okay.

  • How many extra beds have you created in this world?

  • We've actually increases up to 28.

  • 29 altogether.

  • This morning I came into empty bed, which is something that's quite treasured.

  • Sort of surprise.

  • Really?

  • So that is a good sign for us.

  • However, it's still very challenging because we've had three admissions this morning already.

  • Three.

  • Just this morning.

  • Coming in?

  • Yes.

  • Come in.

  • From outside the hospital with hospital within the hospital, conditions got worse, right?

  • That must be right.

  • I mean that is quite a pace.

  • Isn't a new patients that must be very challenging?

  • Challenging?

  • How well are these patients?

  • They're extremely burial.

  • They're critically unwell.

  • These are patients who are needing it's multi organ support.

  • So they're needing support with their breathing.

  • They're needing support with their heart and their needing support for their kidneys.

  • This is their last hope.

  • This is the areas where they come to when there is nowhere else.

  • These are old people.

  • We're looking at here.

  • Are they?

  • They're young, they are young.

  • Sorry, that's one of our commissions coming here.

  • This is a new patient coming in as we speak, probably from somewhere else in the hospital, because their conditions of decline it looks like there are a lot of stuff on there is.

  • It looks like there are a lot of beds there are.

  • But once again, the theme is the same thing is the hospital, which is operating at the outer edge of what it could do, were as follows.

  • Whoever bean managing stay sort of one or two beds ahead of things at the moment.

  • But that's with a lot of help from our neighboring hospitals was very well organized transfer network with police who are helping to move patients to throw between obviously to the layman one or two beds ahead doesn't sound like very much Henry.

  • It is a very tight margin.

  • Sometimes there are multiple people deteriorate at the same time.

  • This just our situation here today.

  • There are times when things very full and certainly as we speak, the hospitals elsewhere in the country are extremely busy right up their capacity.

  • Moreover, this is a hospital operating at the edge of what it should do.

  • You could be looking now.

  • It's sort of three beds toe 13 I t.

  • U beds toe one nurse, and normally you'd be talking about 1 to 1 nursing.

  • Do you think that's safe?

  • Yeah, I think they're just safe to The prime Minister once said that the National Health Service is an institution powered by love, but it isn't, or at least not alone in the main.

  • It's powered by its resources, its people decisions made by politicians years ago on weeks ago, all shaping the crisis it now endures.

  • But for this moment it relies on us.

  • Yet there are those among us who claim that the crisis in our hospitals is confected or exaggerated or it is no different.

  • Tow what is typical?

  • Those people must open their eyes.

  • Must see what is here.

  • Realize how close to the edge we are, How close way might yet be.

Yeah.

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B1 hospital wave people covert moment intensive care

Covid and the NHS: Inside intensive care - BBC Newsnight

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    林宜悉 posted on 2021/01/17
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