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  • The Greater Boston area in the United States is home to a couple nights.

  • Universities.

  • You may have heard of a few sports teams that you may have also heard of and a museum that you're about to hear about, which was the scene of the greatest heist in world history that still remains unsolved.

  • Two men managed to break into the museum overnight and stole over $500 million worth of art in just 81 minutes, and decades later, their identities still remain unknown, as does the location of the art they stole.

  • So how we're two guys able to pull off something so ambitious, and how can you still earn a $10 million reward today related to the case?

  • Let's start from the beginning.

  • Around midnight on March 18th, 1990 a car pulled up to the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston, near the museum side entrance to men wearing fake police uniforms, waited inside the car for over an hour, while only two security guards were present in the museum.

  • One of them was a guy named Richard, who admitted later he would regularly show up to work drunk or stoned, but claimed to be sober.

  • The night of the robbery, he was at the front desk at 1:24 a.m. When the two men dressed, his officers buzz the door and claimed that they were responding to a disturbance call in the courtyard and requested entry.

  • Museum protocol didn't allow uninvited guests in a night.

  • But since there were ST Patrick's Day parties going on around the area, the disturbance call seemed plausible to Richard, and he didn't know if the rule apply to police officers.

  • So he buzzed them in any way.

  • When the two policemen got to his front desk, they told Richard he looked familiar and there was a warrant out for his arrest.

  • They told him to step away and show some identification, So he stepped out from behind the desk where the Onley alarm button to real police was located, and then they put handcuffs on him and arrested him.

  • When the second security guard arrived from patrol, they arrested him to, and when they asked why they were being arrested.

  • That thes told them that they weren't under arrest, but they were getting robbed, so they duct tape their hands, heads and feet and locked them down in the basement.

  • The two thieves then went on to ransack the museums art, taking paintings from the walls and hacking them out of their frames with knives on alarm, went off to alert the guards that somebody was too close to the art, but they just found it and smashed it.

  • Motion detectors also tracked their movements the entire time and were sending alerts, but it didn't matter because of the museum's flawed security.

  • These alarms were only meant to alert the on duty security guards and make them push the button on the front desk.

  • Toe actually called the police, but since they were a little incapacitated, that became impossible.

  • Over 81 minutes of helping themselves to whatever they wanted, they made two trips to their car with 13 pieces of art, including paintings by Rembrandt, Vermeer Dega, an ancient Chinese goo and an eagle from a Napoleonic era flag.

  • One of the paintings, the concert by Vermeer, is regarded as the most valuable stolen object in the world with a value of over $200 million.

  • Once the thieves got into their car and drove off into the night with their $500 million worth of stolen art, they were never heard from again.

  • The rial police didn't show up until 8:30 a.m. And one of the greatest mysteries in U.

  • S.

  • History began being investigated, which 28 years later has found some interesting clues.

  • Richard, for example, seems like he knows more than he claimed just about 30 minutes before the thieves buzz the door to be let in.

  • Richard open the side door on the street they were parked on and then quickly shut it.

  • He claimed that the museum had taught him how to do that to make sure that it was locked.

  • But the timing of it certainly seems suspicious.

  • Also interesting to note, the motion detectors didn't pick up the thieves on the first floor where a piece was stolen, but they did pick up Richard's movements there before the thieves arrived.

  • Richard also claimed that despite the thieves not wearing masks, he couldn't recall any features of what they looked like.

  • Two police shortly afterwards.

  • But perhaps the most interesting new piece of evidence surfaced just in 2015, a security video that shows Richard letting in an unidentified man to the museum the night before the heist took place, which could have been a test run for the actual heist Later the next day, Richard claims that he doesn't remember this event taking place, despite the video evidence contradicting that.

  • More confusingly, though, is what the thieves actually chose to steal.

  • They passed up much more valuable paintings by Raphael and BOTTICELLI, among others they could have easily taken, which suggests the thieves themselves may have been rather amateurish.

  • After conducting hundreds of interviews over to 20 years, the FBI in 2013 announced that they knew the identity of the two thieves but further announced in 2015 that they were both deceased, even if they're not.

  • The statute of limitations for their theft expired long ago, so they couldn't be prosecuted today if they came forward.

  • But they haven't anyway.

  • The location of the artwork stolen remains unknown, despite the museum currently offering a $10 million reward for information that leads to their safe return.

  • When the artwork was stolen.

  • The museum was in the middle of updating their security, but it came too little, too late.

  • The thieves were able to exploit the situation and help themselves to whatever they wanted without ever being caught or punished.

  • And a similar thing has almost happened to me on YouTube twice.

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How 2 Guys Stole $500 Million of Art in 81 Minutes

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    林宜悉 posted on 2021/01/16
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