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  • Hi, I'm Gina.

  • Welcome to Oxford Online English!

  • In this lesson, you can learn how to make a presentation in English.

  • Do you have to make presentations in English in your job?

  • Imagine you have to give an important presentation in English tomorrow.

  • How would you feel about it?

  • This lesson will help you learn useful phrases and techniques to introduce yourself and your

  • topic, keep your ideas organised, deal with problems, and respond to questions from audience

  • members.

  • Imagine you're standing in front of your colleagues.

  • You need to introduce yourself and what your presentation is about.

  • What are some words and phrases you could use?

  • If some people in the audience don't know who you are, you should introduce yourself

  • and your position.

  • In a more formal setting, you could say something like this:

  • Good morning everyone.

  • For those who don't know me, my name's Simon, and I work in the marketing department.

  • Or: Hello everybody.

  • Before we begin, let me introduce myself briefly: I'm Reese and I'm the head of HR.

  • If you work in a more informal company, you could say:

  • Hi guys; if you don't know me, I'm Sylvia and I work in digital marketing.

  • Or: Hello!

  • I see some new faces, so I'll introduce myself first: I'm Julia and I'm one of

  • our customer service team.

  • Next, you need to introduce your topic.

  • If your presentation topic is simpler, you could just say one sentence, like this:

  • Today, I'm going to be talking about our new HR policies and how they affect you.

  • Or: I'd like to talk to you today about quality control and why we're all responsible

  • for quality control, whichever department you work in.

  • If your topic is more complex, you might add more detail to break your idea into stages.

  • For example: I'll begin by outlining the policies, and

  • then I'll go on to highlight what they mean for you and your working habits.

  • Finally, I'll briefly discuss why we feel these new policies are necessary and beneficial

  • for us all.

  • Here's another example: First of all, I'll explain why 'quality

  • control' has a broader meaning than you might expect.

  • I'll continue by giving examples of real quality control, and why this matters for

  • all of us.

  • To finish, I'll be asking you to think of ways you can incorporate quality control into

  • your working habits.

  • Here, you saw two examples.

  • You can use these as templates to begin your presentation:

  • I'll begin byand then I'll

  • Finally, I'll

  • Or: First of all, I'll

  • I'll continue by

  • To finish, I'll

  • Okay, now you can practice!

  • We'd like you to do two things.

  • First, practice introducing yourself informally, and explaining your topic in a simple way,

  • with one sentence.

  • Then, practice introducing yourself formally, and explaining your topic in a more detailed

  • way.

  • Pause the video and practice speaking.

  • All the language you need is in this section.

  • Ready?

  • Let's move on!

  • I'm sure that in your life, you've heard good speakers and bad speakers.

  • Good speakers grab your attention and don't let go.

  • You want to hear what they have to say.

  • You feel interested and energised by listening to them.

  • Bad speakers are the opposite.

  • Even if you try to make yourself listen, you find that your attention drifts away.

  • Your eyelids feel heavy, and you have to struggle to stay awake.

  • So, here's a question: what's the difference between good speakers and bad speakers?

  • And, how can you make sure you speak effectively when you make your presentation in English?

  • Here's one way to think about it: bad speakers don't think they have to earn your attention.

  • Good speakers understand that no one has to listen to them, so they work hard to make

  • you want to pay attention.

  • What does this mean for you, and your presentation?

  • Getting people's attention starts from the beginning.

  • You need to make it clear what people should expect from your presentation, and why they

  • should care about what you have to say.

  • Sounds like a nice idea, but how do you do this?

  • Here are three techniques you can use.

  • One: establish a problem which many people in your audience have.

  • Then, establish that you have a solution to their problem.

  • For example:

  • Have you ever felt unfairly treated at work, or felt that the work you do isn't appreciated?

  • We've been working to design new HR policies that will make sure all staff get fair recognition

  • for their contribution to the company.

  • In this way, you take a boring-sounding topic like HR policies, and you make it more relevant

  • to your audience.

  • How?

  • By connecting it with their experiences and feelings.

  • The second technique?

  • Mention an interesting fact, or a surprising statistic to get people's attention.

  • For example:

  • Did you know that the average office worker spends eight hours a day at work, but only

  • does four hours of productive, useful work?

  • I'm here to tell you about 'quality control', and how you can use this idea to make better

  • use of your time.

  • Finally, you can engage people by telling a short story and connecting it to your topic.

  • Stories are powerful, and they can add an emotional dimension to your topic if you do

  • it well.

  • For example:

  • I once met a young salesman—I won't mention his name.

  • He spent several weeks building a relationship with a potential client.

  • He worked overtime, and he was working so hard that he was under severe stress, which

  • started to affect his personal life.

  • In the end, he didn't close the dealthe clients signed with another firm.

  • Today, I'm going to talk about confidence as a sales tool, and how you can avoid the

  • traps that this young man fell into.

  • Use one of these three techniques in your introduction to connect with your audience

  • and show them why they should be interested in what you have to say.

  • Here's a question for you: which technique would you prefer to use, and why?

  • Okay, now you've introduced your topic and you have everyone's attention.

  • What next?

  • There's a famous quote about making presentations:

  • Tell the audience what you're going to say; say it, and then tell them what you've

  • said.”

  • Have you heard this before?

  • Do you know who said it?

  • This comes from Dale Carnegie, a very successful American salesman and writer.

  • He lived a long time ago, but his advice is still relevant today.

  • So, here's a question: what does the quote mean?

  • It means that your presentation shouldn't just give information.

  • You also need to show people how your information is organized.

  • To do this, you need signposting language.

  • Let me give you an example to explain.

  • Imagine you go to a website.

  • The website is full of really useful, interesting information.

  • But, the information is all on one page.

  • There's no organization, and you have to scroll up and down, up and down this huge

  • page, trying to find what you need.

  • Would you stay on that website?

  • Probably not.

  • You'll find a website which makes it easier for you to find the information you need.

  • What's the point here?

  • The point is that having interesting or relevant information is not enough.

  • How you structure and organize your information is equally important.

  • If you don't structure your presentation clearly, people won't pay attention, just

  • like you won't stay on a website if you can't find the information you want.

  • So, how can you do this?

  • You use signposting language.

  • This means using words and phrases to show the audience where your points begin and end,

  • to show what's coming next, and to remind them about things you talked about before.

  • For example:

  • Okay, that covers the new policies.

  • Next, I'd like to move on and discuss what these policies mean for you.

  • Or: Now that you've heard a bit about what not to do, let's focus on positive advice

  • to help you be more effective salespeople and close more of your leads.

  • When you say something like this, you aren't giving people information about the topic

  • of your presentation.

  • Instead, you're showing people where you are, and where you're going next.

  • It's a kind of signpost.

  • You don't need signposts to travel from one place to another, but they can make it

  • easier.

  • What else can you use signposting language for?

  • You can use signposting language to move from one point to the next.

  • For example:

  • Next, I'd like to talk about

  • Let's move on and discuss

  • Or: At this point, I'd like to turn to

  • You can use signposting language to add detail to an idea:

  • Let me go into some more detail about

  • Let's examinein more depth.

  • Or: I'd like to elaborate on

  • You can use signposting language to show that you've finished your main points, and you've

  • reached your conclusion:

  • To wrap up, let's remind ourselves of why this should matter to everyone here.

  • Let's review the key points from this session.

  • So, you've heard what I have to say.

  • What conclusions can you take away from this?

  • If you have an important presentation in English, practice using signposting language.

  • Use signposting language to move between points, to show when you're giving a summary or

  • going into more detail, and to signal that you've reached your conclusion.

  • Okay, but things don't always go so smoothly in real life.

  • We know that!

  • Let's look at some advice and language for dealing with problems during your presentation.

  • Imagine you're making your presentation in English.

  • What could go wrong?

  • What problems could you have?

  • There are many common problems:

  • You might forget where you were, or forget an important word.

  • You might realise that you said something wrong, or you didn't explain something clearly.

  • You might forget to mention something important.

  • Or, someone might ask you an awkward question, which you have no idea how to answer.

  • Of course, there are other possibilities!

  • Let's think about these problems.

  • What can you do, and more importantly, what can you say in these situations?

  • First of all, it's a good idea to make a cue card with key points, as well as any important

  • vocabulary you need.

  • If you lose your place, or you forget a word, it could help.

  • However, you can't prepare for everything.

  • So, it's useful to learn some phrases to deal with problems smoothly.

  • If you lose your place, and can't remember what to say next, you can use a filler phrase

  • like:

  • Where was I?

  • So, what was I saying?

  • What's the word in English again?

  • If you still can't remember, look at your cue card with your main points.

  • Of course, forgetting something isn't ideal.

  • But, if you do, it's better to keep talking, rather than just standing there in silence.

  • What if you make a mistake, or you realise that you didn't explain something well?

  • You could say:

  • Let me rephrase that.

  • Actually, what I meant to say is

  • To clarify, I wanted to say that

  • In this way, you can correct yourself without admitting that you made a mistake!

  • What if you realise that you forgot to mention something important?

  • Use a phrase like this:

  • Let me just add one more thing:…

  • I'd like to add something to a point we discussed earlier.

  • Let me return to an earlier point briefly.

  • Again, this allows you to correct your mistake in a confident way, so you look like you're

  • in control.

  • Finally, what do you do if someone asks you a difficult question, which you can't answer?

  • You have a few options.

  • First, you can delay giving an answer.

  • For example:

  • I've allocated time for questions at the end of this session, so we'll address your

  • idea later.

  • Or: I'm not in a position to answer that right now, but I'll get back to you later

  • this week.

  • This gives you time to think of an answer and do some research if you have to!

  • Next, you can deflect the question, by asking a question back, or maybe by asking other

  • audience members what they think.

  • For example:

  • That's an interesting question.

  • Before I answer, I'd like to know: what's your take on this?

  • Or: You've raised an important point there.

  • What does everyone else think about this?

  • Finally, if the question is irrelevant, you can dismiss the question and move on.

  • For example:

  • Thanks for your input, but I don't see how that's connected to what I'm saying.

  • I don't mean to be blunt, but I don't think that's relevant to today's discussion.

  • Notice how you can use phrases like thanks for your input, butor I don't mean to

  • be blunt, butto make your language more indirect and polite.

  • So, for dealing with difficult questions, just remember the three d's: delay, deflect,

  • dismiss!

  • Finally, we want to ask you something.

  • Do you have any advice for giving good presentations, in English or any language?

  • We'd love to hear your ideas!

  • Please leave a comment and tell us what you think.

  • Remember to visit our website for more free English lessons: Oxford Online English dot

  • com.

  • Thanks for watching!

  • See you next time!

Hi, I'm Gina.