Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • Oh.

  • Oh, damn.

  • Ohhhhh.

  • Holy !

  • These people are panicking because they're being asked to step out of an elevator onto

  • a single plank that's suspended 80 stories in the air.

  • Oh, man.

  • This game is called Richie's Plank Experience and by their very real reactions you might

  • expect some groundbreaking, photorealistic visuals behind that headset.

  • Oh!

  • God!

  • No! !

  • But that's really not the caseSure, it's nice, but it's clearly not real.

  • The graphics are really beautiful but the lighting isn't quite right - things are

  • just a little too diffused.

  • The buildings are almost too smooth.

  • The plants on the ground are clearly squared off.

  • It's hard to believe these people aren't dramatizing their reactions for the camera.

  • Oh!

  • God!

  • But it's not just the plank experience.

  • The internet is full of VR fails where people are sucked into pixelated worlds with disembodied

  • parts in front of them.

  • But this really got me thinkingHow is it that a virtual world that doesn't look

  • very real at all, feel so real?

  • Of course, the first major difference between watching VR and being in it is putting on

  • the headset.

  • Here's where VR marketing has mostly failed.

  • Right?

  • Because it's always shown from a spectator's perspective.

  • And as a spectator, you do not get the experience of the person in VR.

  • Thong Nguyen is the founder and CEO of Roomera, a company that helps businesses test and understand

  • new spaces before they're built using virtual reality.

  • V.R. communicates to your brain in a different way than looking at a screen.

  • When looking at a screenlike our TV or phoneour brains read this as a flat image

  • in the same way we would view a picture.

  • If an object on a screen gets bigger or smaller or a person on TV moves toward the camera

  • you don't feel the need to take a step back or move out of their way, but in VR you might

  • want to because you're not looking at one screenYou're looking at twoAnd

  • those two screens are literally right in front your eyes.

  • Projecting a slightly different image into each eye.

  • Which is how our vision works in the real worldeach eye takes in stimuli from a

  • slightly different vantage point.

  • You can test this: Hold your finger up in front of your face and wink each of your eyes.

  • Your finger shouldjumpback and forth.

  • Thatjumpis the difference between what your left and right eye are seeing.

  • The differences between what your eyes see conveys depth.

  • It conveys three dimensions.

  • This is known as stereopsis and VR developers have spent a lot of time perfecting it.

  • But what use is depth if you can't move through it?

  • Which brings us to the next most important way virtual reality tricks your brain: you

  • are the camera and it's fast enough where your brain starts interpreting it as your

  • perspective.

  • Head tracking allows a person in VR to look and move around a fake world in the same way

  • we look and move around a real one.

  • If you look left, you'll see more of the world to your left.

  • And if you look down

  • (Screams) Ah.

  • Okay, maybe don't look down.

  • Other subtle effects make virtual spaces feel more real: Like 360 audio, which is a big

  • part of the plank experience.

  • As you turn your head the wind will subtly change.

  • The plank creaks, and if you listen closely a heart beat slowly begins to speed up.

  • Our brain takes all this new, virtual stimuli and begins to believe that this is reality.

  • Our brain has never really learned within the last one hundred fifty thousand years

  • to actually distinguish between computer generated content and the real world.

  • Dr. Frank Steinicke has been studying immersive technologies like VR for nearly 20 years.

  • If all the cues that we perceive from the virtual environment are so similar to the

  • cues that we get in the real world, it makes sense that we are unable to clearly distinguish

  • between both.

  • Our brains quickly adapt to virtual environments largely because it's wired to trust our

  • sense of sight.

  • There's some research showing that approximately 80 percent of all the information that we

  • perceive from our environment are based on vision only.

  • And this allows VR developers to manipulate our reality even further: what we found out

  • about 10 years ago is that if we guide users on a circular arc with a radius of 20 meters,

  • they have no chance to identify that.

  • They actually walk in a circle in the real world when they see a straight path in the

  • virtual environment.

  • You can walk an entire virtual city without ever leaving a room.

  • Once we believe the environment is real and accept that we're actually in it, our brains

  • then go on to fill in some other blanks: there is interesting findings that if you are in

  • the virtual world in a very, let's say, snow or icy environment, people feel cool, although

  • they're in the real world and maybe in a hot environment.

  • Outside of games, VR has shown a lot of promise in the medical world from reducing pain for

  • burn victims by immersing them in a snowy world while their bandages are changed and

  • with exposure therapy that helps people with phobiaslike a fear of heightsand

  • body dysmorphia.

  • It's also been used for physical therapy like assisting elderly people with their balance.

  • Right now, we're still tethered to a system with a headset on our faces.

  • The graphics are nice, but not perfectand so we're not fully immersed when we hover

  • 80 stories above the groundThat is...we can still remember to take the headset off.

  • Steinicke cautions that it might not always be that way.

  • We can easily assume that within the next five to 10 years or so, we will not be able

  • to distinguish visually computer generated content from from real world content anymore.

  • And then, of course, there are a lot of ethical questions.

  • For now, VR might not look exactly like reality, but it follows a lot of the rules our brain

  • has learned to perceive as real, and that's often enough to make us sweat.

Oh.

Subtitles and vocabulary

Operation of videos Adjust the video here to display the subtitles

B1 Vox vr virtual plank real world brain

How virtual reality tricks your brain

  • 18 1
    林宜悉 posted on 2020/12/22
Video vocabulary