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  • 90 year old Margaret Keenan became the first person in the UK to receive the Pfizer jab today.

  • It meant the UK became the first country in the world to begin using a clinically approved covert 19 vaccine.

  • 800,000 doses of the Pfizer beyond tech vaccine enough for 400,000 people have already arrived in the UK The over eighties care home workers on NHS staff will be among the very first to get the job.

  • More than 80 vaccine centers are being set up.

  • Most Fanara in hospitals and people will be called in to be vaccinated.

  • Health editor Hugh Pym was in Coventry.

  • The first vaccine rolled out a warning.

  • His report contains flashing images on early morning hospital appointment.

  • At first glance, nothing out of the ordinary.

  • But this was unlike anything before Margaret, aged 90 was the very first patient to receive the newly approved Corona virus vaccine theme.

  • There was a well deserved round of applause on intense interest among media and health officials at this hospital vaccination clinic in Coventry.

  • She seemed to take it all in her stride.

  • So, Margaret, first of all, tell us how was it for you it was fine.

  • It was fine.

  • E wasn't nervous.

  • It all.

  • It was really good.

  • Yeah, on what do you say to those who might be having second thoughts about having this vaccine?

  • I'll stay cool fridge girlfriend because it's it's free on.

  • It's the best thing, that stuff that happened at the moment, so do please call for it.

  • That's what I say.

  • You know, if I can do it well, so can you.

  • The matron who administered the historic job said the significance only sunk in afterwards.

  • I do this all the time.

  • I've done hundreds of vaccinations, but never with such interest.

  • People like wanting to know what's going on and wanting to actually witness it is really surreal.

  • We it's a world first.

  • It represents extraordinary progress by science.

  • But for the NHS, this is a huge achievement, turning research into reality.

  • Around the UK, there was similar stories in Glasgow.

  • The vaccine was delivered to the SEC center, with NHS staff among the first to receive the jobs.

  • It's really exciting.

  • It's lovely.

  • You feel like you're a wee bit of history in the making, don't you?

  • It's really lovely.

  • In Belfast, health staff queued to get their jobs.

  • The policy is for those doing the vaccinations to be vaccinated first.

  • Their health service in general has struggled throughout the fight and for cover 19.

  • So it feels like a momentous day, so very privileged.

  • At this vaccine center in Cardiff, one of seven in Wales, more than 200 people have been booked in every day till Friday.

  • We do need people to be patient for that bit longer.

  • Let's get through to the spring.

  • Aziz.

  • We work through to the spring.

  • We will be vaccinating as many people as we can.

  • The prime minister, on a visit to a London vaccination center, wanted to rein in people's expectations, so I just urge people to contain their impatience.

  • Uh, it's a very, very exciting moment, but it's still Ah, lot of work to be done on a lot of discipline to be maintained.

  • The head of NHS England was urging people not to turn up without appointments.

  • Wait to hear from the NHS.

  • We will make contact with you.

  • The vaccine is being made available to us from the manufacturers on a phased basis, so the bulk of the vaccination is going to be in January, February, March and April.

  • The priority groups now include the over eighties.

  • Harry and Ranjan, who spoke to us yesterday, had their jobs together in Newcastle with badges to prove it.

  • Margaret certainly won't forget her vaccination.

  • Nor will NHS staff on a dramatic and momentous day, which they can only hope marks a turning point.

  • Que Pim BBC News Coventry Well, as we've been hearing today, is being seen as a historic day with thousands of people receiving the vaccine across the UK Our correspondent John Kaye has been speaking to a few of them, a day so many have been waiting for on at Bristol's South made hospital.

  • First in the queue is Jack.

  • Good morning, Good morning.

  • Good morning, 98 I suppose it's excitement.

  • He's been in hospital for a month, having treatment for bone cancer, but he'll be heading home in a few days, So the vaccine that's just arrived should start to protect him from co vid.

  • So we're gonna give the injection in the top of your arm just here.

  • I thought that's what we came for you.

  • That's exactly I just didn't want any surprises, no surprises and no hesitation this veteran of the Second World War.

  • Happy to follow orders on this and for P.

  • All right, what's he boots?

  • That's why I mean nervy, Sir.

  • Jack will still have to follow orders even when he's had his second jab later this month.

  • But he will finally be able to think about seeing his family again live in hope that the middle of next year be, hopefully, be living a normal life.

  • E.

  • I haven't seen you in so long.

  • Bless him.

  • Jax granddaughter Steph hasn't been able to visit because of his cancer on because of the co vid risk, so she was delighted to see our pictures.

  • She hopes the vaccine will mean he consumed be with the great grandchildren he loves so much for in such a social character, love seeing people.

  • So just to be able to go and see him that bit more on do not have the worry will be great.

  • Ah, hope echoed across the country today in Milton Keene's husband and wife, Arthur and Barbara.

  • She went first.

  • Rather have the vaccine than have the Covic 19.

  • I mean, if you're given a choice, there's there's no contest on in the Bard's County of Warwickshire.

  • To jab or not to jab this really is 81 year old William Shakespeare could make a difference to our lives from now on.

  • Goodness, start of changing our lives with our lifestyle.

  • You've made history today back in Bristol.

  • No sign of any side effects for Jack.

  • Grateful on finally able to plan a future John K.

  • BBC News.

  • While today regulators in the U.

  • S.

  • Confirmed the Pfizer beyond tech vaccine is 95% effective, paving the way for it to be approved for emergency use there.

  • There are more than 40 other vaccines currently undergoing human clinical trials around the world.

  • Our science editor, David Shankman, looks now at the huge challenge of how to roll out vaccines globally so that all countries could benefit.

  • The vaccine deployed today marks a turning point for the UK, But when will it start to reach the rest of the world along with the others that are being developed?

  • Ah, huge global operation is getting underway.

  • Doses of the Pfizer biotech vaccine, which requires extreme cold, are ready to be dispatched a soon as other countries follow the UK in giving approval.

  • But at the moment supply can't possibly meet demand.

  • The manufacturing process is complicated, and industry analysts say that production is encountering more hurdles than expected.

  • It's incredibly hard to produce a vaccine.

  • That's just it's like cooking the same soup again and again night after night and has to taste exactly the same.

  • It's very difficult to do at scale, so we will see hers.

  • And I think the production figures, the big figures that are floating around they are on the optimistic side.

  • There's no doubt about that.

  • Rolling out the vaccines on a global scale is a daunting challenge.

  • The global population stands at 7.8 billion now.

  • Not everyone needs to be vaccinated to suppress the pandemic, maybe 70% to achieve what's called herd immunity.

  • But that still leaves 5.4 billion people on three leading manufacturers of vaccines, so that they hope, during the course of the next year to produce enough doses for 2.6 billion people.

  • So that still leaves more than half the planet waiting for a vaccine, probably in 2022 or even the year after.

  • On when the poorest nations do get the vaccines, there'll be the immense task of distribution.

  • This was the journey for an Ebola vaccine.

  • There are initiatives to help developing countries, but then not at the front of the queue.

  • It feels like there is a lot of vaccine nationalism happening, so that's rich states buying up the vaccines for themselves.

  • Now the issue there is not who gets it, because I think the vaccine will become available to lower middle income countries in particular, but when that's the big problem.

  • Meanwhile, Russia has started using its own vaccine, but many are wary off it because safety trials are still underway and China is also producing vaccines.

  • But there are questions about whether enough testing has been carried out.

  • Getting this far is the result of some brilliant research conducted under immense pressure.

  • The job now is to get it out to the billions who were waiting.

  • David Tuckman, BBC News on a medical editor Fergus Walsh is here with me, Fergus says.

  • No doubting what a big day this is.

  • Yes, Rita, the superlatives are justified.

  • This is an historic day, and it marks the first steps in a long road towards a return to normality that for most of the year, the world's hopes have bean pinned on a Corona virus vaccine, but it was by no means certain that we'd get an effective one so quickly.

  • It's an astonishing achievement.

  • For example, despite decades of research on more than £10 billion in investment, we still don't have an HIV vaccine now as well as the Pfizer jab.

  • There are two more coronavirus vaccines that looked safe and effective.

  • There's, um, a journey jab.

  • Then there's the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine, and Oxford today became the first developers to publish their full trial data in a scientific journal, which is important for transparency on That confirms that it's 70% effective overall in protecting against Cove it.

  • And crucially, no one who got the vaccine got seriously ill with co vid or was hospitalized.

  • Now if, as hoped, the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine is approved by the end of the month, that will allow a major ramping up of the immunization here.

  • The UK has ordered enough doses for 50 million people in the UK The Oxford vaccine doesn't need to be stored at minus 70 which will make it a really important global vaccine.

  • On AstraZeneca's pledged to provide it not for profit.

  • There are 52 co vid vaccines in human trials, and we're going to need many more of them, because until every country has the vaccine, this pandemic won't be over.

  • Okay, Fergus.

  • Thank you.

  • Are medical editor Fergus Walsh?

90 year old Margaret Keenan became the first person in the UK to receive the Pfizer jab today.

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Historic moment as woman aged 90 gets first clinically-approved Covid vaccine - BBC News

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/12/16
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