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  • Hello and welcome to News Review from BBC Learning English.

  • I'm Neil and joining me is Catherine. Hi Catherine.

  • Hello Neil and hello everybody. Yes, last week saw the death of Diego Maradona,  

  • the world famous footballer. His doctor has been accused of not taking care of him properly.

  • OK. Well, if you want to test yourself on any of the vocabulary you learn in this programme,  

  • there's a quiz on our websitebbclearningenglish.com.

  • Now, let's hear some more about this story – about Diego Maradonafrom this BBC News report.

  • So, Argentinian footballer Diego Maradona died last week at the age of 60.

  • He had various health problems including diabetes and substance dependency.

  • He'd recently had a brain operation as well.

  • Now, his doctor is being accused of not looking after him properly.

  • You've been looking at the various news stories about this on the internet

  • and you've picked out three words that are useful to talk about it

  • What have we got?

  • Yes, we have: 'negligence', 'breaks down' and 'raids'.

  • 'Negligence', 'breaks down' and 'raids'. Let's start then with your first headline.

  • Yes, we're starting in Australia today with SBS Newsthe headline:

  • 'Negligence' – failure to take enough care.

  • Yes. It's a noun. It's spelt N-E-G-L-I-G-E-N-C-E and the pronunciation is 'negligence'.

  • OK. Interesting pronunciation:

  • we've got two 'g's in a short spacebut they're pronounced differently.

  • They are indeed the first 'g' is pronounced 'guh'

  • and the second 'g', which is followed by an 'e', is pronounced 'juh'.

  • So, we have: 'neg-li-gence' – 'negligence'.

  • Right. Now, when we talk about 'negligence' it's fairly serious, isn't it?

  • We're not talking about forgetting to bring your laptop to work, or something like that.

  • No, that's just being forgetful; 'negligence' is where you don't do something

  • that you really should do or you're required to do by law and if you don't do it,

  • something badvery badmay result.

  • Yeah. So, we often see this word in combination with the area that concerns it,

  • for example, 'medical negligence'.

  • Yes, or we can have 'corporate negligence', for example.

  • And it's often used in the context of accusations or even criminal or civil lawsuits.

  • So, it's very much used in legal terms as well.

  • Yeah. So, 'negligence' is when someone or somebody 'neglects' its duty.

  • You used the verb form there, Neil – I heard that.

  • Yes, 'neglect' is the verb form and 'neglect' is also a noun as well.

  • So, if you 'neglect' a child or a child experiences 'neglect',

  • it means you're not looking after its basic needs properly

  • and often, again, the authorities will step inThere might be police or social workers involved.

  • Yes. And there's also an adjective?

  • 'Neglected'. Yes, if a child is 'neglected'

  • or in this case if Diego Maradona's healthcare was 'neglected', there will be serious consequences.

  • Yes, and we can also say that someone or something is 'negligent'.

  • Yes, that is also the adjective form. You can be 'negligent'.

  • OK. Let's have a summary:

  • If you would like to hear another story about 'negligence' and 'neglect',  

  • we have one about air pollutionWhere can they find it, Catherine?

  • You can find that story by clicking the link.

  • Right. Now, it's time for your next headline.

  • It is and we are now in the UKlooking at The Starthe headline:

  • 'Breaks down' – starts crying.

  • Now, in this headline there's a clue because it says 'breaks down in tears',

  • but we don't need the 'in tears' and it still means crying, doesn't it?

  • Absolutely, yes. Now, 'breaks down'... B-R-E-A-K-S. Second word: D-O-W-N.

  • If you 'break down', it means you really start to cry,

  • kind of very emotionally, very suddenly and you can't really control yourself.

  • Now, this is not the kind of crying that you get at the end of a film, Neil,

  • when you're watching a sort of sad film and you get – a little tear comes to your eye.

  • Do you ever get that?

  • When I'm watching one of those Disney Pixar films with my kids

  • and it's got the bit that appeals to the grown-ups and the tear appears...

  • No, no this is not 'breaking down' – that's just a little...

  • No, that's not breaking downwhen your kids go, 'Daddy, why are you crying?'

  • and there's a little tear down your eye. No 'break' – if you 'break down',

  • you really lose control of your... of your emotions:  

  • you cry very loudly, you cry very suddenly.

  • You really, kind of, can't control yourself and it's not a nice experience.

  • It's a human experience, but it's not like you enjoy a sad film crying;

  • this is proper kind of losing control: cryingsobbing, almost getting hysterical. Yeah.

  • Yeah. It can be for happy reasons though as well.

  • Oh yes, you know, if something really good happens that you've been waiting for a long time.

  • You've been... you had an exam result that's really important to you.

  • You get the grade you wantedyou might 'break down' in tears of happiness or tears of relief.

  • So, it's not always 'breaking downbecause of bad things, but often it is:

  • we get a shock, we get bad news, there's a crime being committed, somebody dies,

  • you have a really bad breakup and you lose all control of your emotions

  • and you cry loudly and noisilyand people can't calm you down.

  • That's what we mean by 'to break down'.

  • Yeah. So, that's a verb and we've got two words there: 'break' and 'down'.

  • There is a noun, a 'breakdown', which is one word but that's slightly different, isn't it?

  • We're talking about a full sort of emotional collapse.

  • Yes. Yeah, if you have a 'breakdown', you may well cry uncontrollably,

  • but often it's more to do with a sort of a mental health issue.

  • So, if you have a 'breakdown' – a psychological 'breakdown' – as well as crying,

  • you've got other associated difficulties and you probably need some professional help

  • or some certainly some time and treatment to help you to recover from that.

  • Now, like many phrasal verbs, 'break down' has various meanings,

  • which may not seem connected, but we think there is a connection between them.

  • So, for example over the weekend my car 'broke down'.

  • Now, it doesn't mean it started crying, does it?

  • No. But it does mean it wasn't working like it normally would,

  • and if we think of... although 'breaking down' in tears

  • is something that happens to most of us and it's part of being human,

  • you're, kind of, not on the normal functioning that you  

  • would expect and like to have on a daily basis.

  • Just as your carif it stops working – it 'breaks down' and doesn't work anymore,

  • when a human 'breaks down' and cries,

  • you're not doing what you'd normally do on a good day, let's say.

  • OK. Let's have a summary:

  • So, for a happier sporting story we have one about Rafael Nadal,

  • the Spanish tennis player who won his 20th Grand Slam recently.

  • Where can they find it, Catherine?

  • They can find this story by clicking the link below.

  • OK. Onto your next headline, please.

  • Yes, we're now at the BBCthe headline:

  • 'Raid' – action by police in which they suddenly enter a building.

  • Yes. So, this is spelt: R-A-I-D. It can be a verb and it's also a noun: 'raid'.

  • OK. So, we're talking here about a sudden and very dramatic break in to a property...

  • Yes, very dramatic.

  • ...in order to try to find something or someone.

  • That's exactly it. Often done by the police or it can be done by the army, the military:

  • they surround a house but they do it very quietly and by stealth

  • so that the people in the house or other building don't know that they're there.

  • Then, suddenly, in they gooften they have to force the doorthey go in

  • and they make sure everything's secure and then they look for something

  • or they try to do something that they need to do inside that house.

  • Sosurprising, it's very forceful, often done at nighttime when people aren't expecting it.

  • In they go, and then they look for usually a person or drugs

  • or in the doctor's case we don't know what they were looking for or trying to do,

  • but something they had to do in the house and they wanted to do it by surprise.

  • Now, the word 'raid' is the sort of word that ordinary people use

  • and also obviously in news headlinesIt's probably not the official term

  • for this type of action that the police would use or the military.

  • There's probably... in their documentation there'll be a particular way of saying it,

  • but for you and me and the papers we say the police 'did a raid'

  • or the police 'raided' the house or building or nightclub or whatever.

  • Yeah. And the people involved in the 'raid' are 'raiders'.

  • They are 'raiders', yes.

  • And you will know that name if you're a fan of films:

  • you'll know Tomb Raider and also Raiders of the Lost Ark.

  • That's right, yes.

  • OK. Let's have a summary:

  • Time now then for a summary of our vocabulary, please.

  • Yes. We had 'negligence' – failure to take enough care.

  • We had 'breaks down' – starts crying.

  • And we had 'raid' – action by police in which they suddenly enter a building.

  • Don't forget to test yourself on the vocabulary on our website at bbclearningenglish.com.

  • We're also all over social media. Take care and goodbye.

  • Goodbye.

Hello and welcome to News Review from BBC Learning English.

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B1 negligence raid headline diego police summary

Diego Maradona: Doctor’s house searched: BBC News Review

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/12/01
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