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  • almost two in the morning on the 26th of April 1986.

  • 25 year old firefighter Vasily Ignatenko is part of the first response team tasked with putting out a fire at the Chernobyl nuclear power station.

  • Chunks of highly radioactive graphite lie around of the site.

  • Men pick up bits and kick them around, not knowing that they're sealing their fate.

  • They do a commendable job, a heroic job but Ignatenko and others on that team, or just hours away from falling gravely ill.

  • One of the fireman jokes.

  • There must be an incredible amount of radiation here.

  • We'll be lucky if we're all still alive in the morning.

  • Days later and Ignatenko is pregnant, Wife has to bribe hospital staff so she can see her dying husband.

  • He's just too radioactive to be close to.

  • His skin is almost white, translucent.

  • He's unrecognizable.

  • He's been eaten from the inside.

  • Months later, after he's past, his daughter is born.

  • Her heart is malformed.

  • She has cirrhosis of the liver.

  • She dies just hours after childbirth.

  • What you just heard is an abridged version of one of the worst ways to die.

  • One of the most painful most brutal ways to leave this blue planet of ours.

  • You could, calling the tangos downfall extreme.

  • He was a first responder to the worst nuclear plant disaster the world has ever seen.

  • But death by radiation comes in many forms.

  • Its horror manifest itself in myriad ways.

  • It could be fast, while a few days won't seem to pass so fast when your body is eating itself.

  • But it can also be slow, very, very slow.

  • Let's stay with the story of Ignatenko for now.

  • When he and the other fireman turned up at the power plant on that fateful early morning, they didn't know what was really going on.

  • It's true that one of the fireman joked about there being a possibility that they were exposed to high levels of radiation, but it was just that a joke.

  • It soon became a reality.

  • Though 27 firefighters died from what's called acute radiation sickness, aka A R.

  • S.

  • In simple terms, that's a sickness you get when you're exposed to massive amounts of radiation.

  • The number of actual radiation related deaths was more than 4000, but many of those deaths were of the slow kind.

  • There were other deaths to such as the fireman that died from external and internal radiation burns, as well as get this a blistered heart.

  • Let's hope you never have to hear those two words together for the rest of your life.

  • Let's now talk you through a RS.

  • They're usually four stages, starting with what the medical profession calls the pro adorable stage.

  • This happened soon after the exposure, and it involves a lot of throwing up and leaking from the rear end.

  • In the case of Ignatenko, he was excreting bloody loose stools around 25 times a day.

  • If that wasn't bad enough, at times he threw up bits of his internal organs.

  • We told you this was bad and it gets worse.

  • His wife, Lyudmila, watched on as her husband slowly fell apart.

  • She actually risked her own life being near him because the father of that fetus in her womb was radioactive himself.

  • She watched helplessly as staff struggled to put slippers on his swollen feet.

  • Another of the symptoms, she witnessed staff not being able to clothe him in the hospital count.

  • His body, she said, had transformed.

  • He was taking on different shapes in her own words, she said every day and that a brand new person, the burns, started to come to the surface.

  • The lesions on his body spread, making his skin looked like a glossy white film.

  • This came as a surprise to her because at one point he seemed to get better.

  • It was a Ziff.

  • The sickness was abating.

  • It wasn't.

  • What was happening is that he was experiencing stage two of theirs.

  • The latent stage.

  • This could last hours or weeks.

  • Some people can recover after a R s, but those that don't are going to experience literal hell on Earth.

  • The radiation will destroy the bone marrow in the body, which can lead to deadly infections and hemorrhage.

  • The G I tract can be destroyed asking the cardiovascular and central nervous system.

  • You don't have much chance of survival after that.

  • It all depends on how much radiation of persons exposed Thio.

  • Some folks might be kept alive with the help of medical staff.

  • Antibiotics can fight infections.

  • Blood transfusions can supply much needed white blood cells.

  • But the fact is, even if the person gets through the month, there could be many, many complications.

  • Let's now talk about the skin.

  • If a person's poisoned by radiation, what often happens at first is their skin will become red and and may feel itchy.

  • This can lead the blisters, which may scar and in worst cases may even kill the skin cells, something called the necrosis.

  • As for Port Ignatenko, he suffered from something called declamation, which basically means his skin started to peel off the blood vessels in his skin, failed toe work, and so he lost tissue at deeper levels.

  • And this is why his wife said he barely looked human.

  • At that point, we should say that hair loss is almost guaranteed, but that's hardly a concern.

  • When your skin is fallen off, stranger things can happen months after radiation exposure.

  • Listen to this.

  • It's what one guy said about a friend of his who was at the disaster site.

  • My neighbor.

  • He was also there.

  • He worked a crane.

  • He got black like coal and shrunk so that he was wearing kids clothes.

  • What the hell you see?

  • We've only explained to you some of the horrors that happened to the people who died just days or weeks after exposure.

  • There were many others who would succumb in months or years.

  • Sasha Yushenko could tell you about the prolonged agony.

  • On the night of the disaster, he held a heavy reactor hall door open so men could get through.

  • The three guys that went in died within two weeks.

  • He survived, but that part of his body that held the door was exposed to massive amounts of radiation.

  • About an hour later, he was vomiting.

  • He had a searing pain in his throat.

  • More time passed and he couldn't stand up at the hospital.

  • The staff measured the amount of radiation in his body, and he was given a 50 50 chance of surviving.

  • He was sent to Moscow with other men who had been exposed.

  • Five of them died quite quickly, something Yushchenko would later say was a blessing.

  • In a matter of days, all his hair had fallen out, not just on his head but on his entire body, he said.

  • Most men suffered from skin rashes, huge ugly rashes that burned, some were given bone marrow transplants and all the men received multiple blood transfusions.

  • He experienced that latent stage when the sickness seemed to calm down, but it came back with a vengeance.

  • One day he pulled back the sheets on his bed on Lee to see piles of black dead skin.

  • Part of his body that had held the door had become horribly swollen.

  • The skin died around his shoulder and arm, and it was just plain luck that he managed to keep it.

  • Years later, it would almost be half the size of his good arm.

  • For many years, he affected body parts would just break out in alterations, which meant for much of his life he was covered in bandages after having operations.

  • He actually felt like one of the fortunate ones because he witnessed his friends losing their eyesight or succumbing after bone marrow transplants.

  • You see, the radiation destroys bone marrow cells, and when they go, the victim doesn't have the white blood cells that fight infections.

  • They're vulnerable sitting ducks.

  • For those who survived, like Yushchenko, their lives were forever changed.

  • They were likely infertile, but they were told not to bother having kids.

  • Anyway.

  • There was a likelihood that the kids would be born malformed or would developed leukemia.

  • We're still the survivors became pariahs.

  • People looked at them like they were the living dead, dangerous carriers of radiation, and so people would cross the street when they saw him coming.

  • Then there were the ones that died of radiation related cancers.

  • No one could say exactly how many people that was.

  • But it's thought that maybe as many as 270,000 people in Ukraine, Russia and Belarus developed cancers because of the disaster.

  • It's estimated that around 93,000 of them died, a lot of them just Children.

  • Many women were exposed to high levels of radiation, but because they never suffered the more extreme symptoms of radiation poisoning, they didn't think too much about it.

  • Then they had kids sick kids.

  • It should also be said that many people drank milk from cows that grazed on contaminated land.

  • Some of those kids developed cancer early on in life, but others suffered from very strange and McCobb sounding birth defects.

  • The human embryo and fetus are very sensitive to radiation, So while mom might look fine, it doesn't mean her newborn will be.

  • Some kids whose parents had been exposed to high levels of radiation were born with a club foot or a cleft palate or a cleft lip.

  • Some had an extra finger or an extra toe, while others had digits on their hands or feet that refused together.

  • Believe it or not.

  • In 1993 there were reports of a two headed baby being born in the former Soviet republic of Moldova.

  • She had not Onley two heads but also had two hearts, two sets of lungs and two spinal cords.

  • Radiation was to blame.

  • We've concentrated largely on the Chernobyl disaster, but death from radiation has taken out a lot of people, some of them well known figures.

  • Take, for instance, Marie Currie, the Nobel Prize winning physicist who discovered polonium and radium.

  • She usedto love the blue green glow of her test tubes that contained radioactive isotopes.

  • She'd walk around with them in her pockets.

  • This would lead to her downfall.

  • She became almost blind, severely ill and eventually died because of her ignorance.

  • Then there was the wealthy American socialite named Eben Byers.

  • In the 19 twenties, he was a huge fan of drinking radium, dissolved in water.

  • A glass a day keeps the doctor away.

  • He told his friends in the public on Lee to gradually become sick, lose weight, lose his teeth and the best part of his jaw.

  • When he died, there were holes in his skull.

  • A similar thing happened to who we now call the radium girls.

  • These young women were employed to paint watch faces with radium infused Glowing Inc.

  • Something which was great for soldiers and that took off is a fashion.

  • Little did they know that when they sharpened their paintbrushes by putting the bristles in their mouth, they were ingesting radio.

  • Many of them lost teeth, their jaw and some died painfully and slowly.

  • Let's not forget the former KGB agent Alexander Litvinenko.

  • After gaining political asylum in the UK in 2006, his cup of tea was dosed with polonium 2 10.

  • Within weeks, he was a dead man.

  • Some believe that this kind of hit was a big statement and a warning to anyone that dared defy the Almighty Putin.

  • The poison wasn't designed to kill Litvinenko quickly, but to make him suffer as much as possible.

almost two in the morning on the 26th of April 1986.

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B1 INT radiation skin died exposed bone marrow radium

Radiation - Worst Ways to Die

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/11/24
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