Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • How dare you break wind before me?

  • I'm sorry, baby.

  • I didn't know it was your turn.

  • Welcome to watch Mojo.

  • And today we're counting down our picks for the top 10 Origins of weird words.

  • Oh, have you been eating that sandwich again, Sand?

  • Which are you being smart with?

  • Me?

  • If you're being smart with me, young lady, you gonna be punished, Punished for being smart for being a smart Alec.

  • How do you say lawyers in Spanish lawyers?

  • Uh Abou Callus, El Grande Avocado.

  • For this list, we're discussing some of the strangest words with even stranger beginnings.

  • If there are any odd bits of language with odd origins we missed, please tell us about them using your own words in the comments.

  • Say, if you like what you're hearing, be sure to check out the full song at the link below.

  • Come in on, babe.

  • Yes.

  • So e don't Century number 10 shambles.

  • The Entomology of this word is, well, the shambles.

  • I bet that clear your Sinuses say total shambles as unite its roots stem from the word stool in various languages as well as words that mean key Oscar vendor stall in English.

  • This morphed over time into a general term for somewhere where meat was peddled, and eventually it came to refer to where animals were butchered.

  • Then, in the early 19 hundreds, shambles became an ironic term for describing something as a bloody mess by comparing it essentially to a slaughterhouse.

  • What the hell have to know?

  • The sudden this car turned into a cannoli, It's secure phone, and it saved your life.

  • Look at you.

  • You're in shambles, So think about that the next time your life is in shambles.

  • Number nine tragedy He ancient Greeks helped found a lot of things we take for granted nowadays, from philosophy to democracy.

  • But they also heavily influenced Western theater traditions and jars, particularly tragedy.

  • The original Greek word Tregoe DEA referred to a play or poem with an unhappy ending to contrast with comedies.

  • Okay, who is the father of Greek tragedy?

  • Anyone?

  • Anyone okay, escalates.

  • It is his trilogy, the Oresteia, but its literal meaning was goat song of all things, whether it was because of the Greeks, legends about seders or because goats were used as a prize during poetry contests or for some other reason, we don't know.

  • But Whatever the reason, it is still decidedly bizarre.

  • Number eight.

  • Avocado, avocados air A tricky little fruit aside from being good for guacamole harder than steel until they suddenly aren't and technically abery avocados also have some rather surprising entomological origins.

  • Plenty have noticed the strange similarity between the Spanish word for lawyer avocado and the English word avocado.

  • How do you say lawyers in Spanish lawyers, uh, avocados El Grande avocado thistles?

  • Because English speakers mistook the rial Spanish word for avocado Agua cat with their word for lawyer, which used to be avocado still with us, your soya Vigano e forgot.

  • Oh, abogado lawyer.

  • Even stranger is the fact that Agua Kat is derived from the Aztec word Allah Cottle, which means testicle, no doubt in reference to their similar shapes.

  • Some food for thought the next time you have some avocado toast.

  • Number seven Disaster.

  • A disaster refers to an unfortunate or ruinous event, but its origins lie in both ancient Greece as well as in the stars.

  • And with all this romantic atmosphere, disasters in the the Greeks put a lot of stock in the heavens as a means of reading the outcome or origin of events on Earth.

  • The word disaster comes from the prefix dese, meaning reversal or removal, and the Greek word Aston on meaning star.

  • So any disaster is therefore said to be the result of a bad star disaster.

  • No, this is not a disaster.

  • Is an earthquake is a disaster.

  • This comes through in other English expressions, such as being born under a bad star.

  • Number six.

  • Smart Alec.

  • No, you're not thinking you're too busy being a smart Alec to be thinking when someone gets called a smart Alec, it's usually because they're acting smug or sarcastic, and the person calling them that wants to use another word beginning with a instead.

  • Yes, I guess that means there are two in the Western Hemisphere.

  • Uh, what's your smart ass gotta say?

  • Not essentially a smart Alec is too smart for their own good.

  • However, what's truly shocking is that smart Alec may have been named after a really person.

  • Alec Hogue was 1/19 century New York conman pimp and thief.

  • Alec and his wife would scam men out of their money using a variety of schemes, eventually landing them in jail.

  • The newspapers helped popularize his immortal nickname Are you being smart with me?

  • If you're being smart with me, young lady, you gonna be punished, Punished for being smart, for being a smart Alec.

  • So every time we talked back to our parents, they responded by comparing us to 1/19 century pimp Low blow number five berserk.

  • When someone goes or appears berserk, they displayed great ferocity or rage.

  • Yeah, the word is derived from the north, sir.

  • Viking word berserker, a type of warrior who often displayed reckless and violent behavior in battle.

  • The word berserker, in turn, means bear shirt after berserker is common practice of donning bare skin for warmth and intimidation of their enemies.

  • There, bare inspired garments may also have been for religious purposes, as bare worship was widespread in Europe's pagan cultures, Number four fizzle When something fizzles, it makes a sizzling or sputtering noise, although the word can also mean that something has failed to run out of steam, as in this explanation fizzled out.

  • Normally, your father's crackpot schemes fizzle out as soon as he finds something good on TV.

  • Anyhoo, fizzle comes from the middle English term fist, which back in those days was another word for And yes, we swear this is true breaking wind.

  • How dare you break wind before me?

  • I'm sorry, baby.

  • I didn't know it was your turn.

  • More specifically, fizzle means breaking wind without noise that's quietly farting for everyone Slow on the uptake.

  • So you might say that when something fizzles, it's silent but dead on arrival.

  • Much like this joke, nothing just fizzled out.

  • Number three quarantine.

  • An appropriate word to examine during the time of covert 19.

  • While everyone, as of this writing probably knows what it means, Quarantine means isolation from outside influence, usually to prevent the spread of disease.

  • Fittingly enough, quarantine originates from the plague containment policies of Italy.

  • During the 16 hundreds, the term Quaranta journey, or space of 40 days was used by Venice port officials to describe the policy of keeping ships coming from plague stricken countries at sea for 40 days to ensure there were no afflicted people aboard.

  • Number two.

  • Nightmare Night.

  • That's the time when the sun isn't hitting Earth and Mare.

  • That's a female horse, right?

  • Case closed.

  • Everybody go home.

  • Hold your horses.

  • Hypothetical person.

  • It's not quite right.

  • Please, God, there is God.

  • The mayor part of Nightmare actually refers to a figure from German and Slavic folklore, a kind of female goblin.

  • The mayor was said to sit on the chests of sleeping people and bring on a feeling of suffocation and bad dreams.

  • Hence nightmares.

  • You killed me part just in case you needed any more inspiration for your bad dreams.

  • Now you can have nightmares about nightmares before we get to our topic.

  • Here are some honorable mentions.

  • Mortgage.

  • You're literally paying off your death pledge hazard from the Arabic bazaar or dice.

  • Quite the risk clue from the clue of thread used by thesis to find his way in the Labyrinth.

  • Jumbo named for a really elefant robot.

  • A Czech playwright introduced this word from Roberta Meeting Serfdom.

  • Before we continue, be sure to subscribe to our channel and ring the bell to get notified about our latest videos.

  • You have the option to be notified for occasional videos or all of them.

  • If you're on your phone, make sure you go into your settings and switch on notifications.

  • Number one sandwich sandwich sounds like a town in England and surprise surprise.

  • It is, however, the practice of putting food usually meat between two slices of bread actually has its origins in a man, not the town.

  • John Montague was the fourth Earl of Sandwich in the 18th century.

  • Montague was a busy man and didn't take traditional meals that often opting instead for something like beef between two slices of bread.

  • Others seeing his habit would request the same as sandwich giving rise to the word as we use it today.

  • Go quick, agitating Steinmetz and use an open faced club, the sand wedge hoping faced club sandwich.

  • Although there is some debate over whether Montague was more likely to take his sandwich while working or gambling and what manner the beef itself was cooked, it's clear that sandwiched somewhere between the varying accounts lies the truth.

  • Do you agree with our picks?

  • Let us know in the comments.

  • And, hey, if you're a fan of the song playing right now, be sure to check out the music video for it right here.

  • You're ST with a sinner.

How dare you break wind before me?

Subtitles and vocabulary

Operation of videos Adjust the video here to display the subtitles

B2 alec smart avocado sandwich disaster punished

Top 10 Words With Strange Origins

  • 0 0
    林宜悉 posted on 2020/11/19
Video vocabulary