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  • - This movie's great 'cause when Sam Jackson goes,

  • he's standing there,

  • "you know we all have to come together and-"

  • [chomps]

  • He just gets eaten.

  • [laughs]

  • Hi, my name is Apryl Boyle,

  • I am a marine and environmental scientist

  • who specializes in sharks,

  • and the founder of El Porto Shark.

  • And today we're going to review some

  • shark attack scenes in film and television.

  • So come on in, the water's great.

  • [electric guitar]

  • This clip is from Jaws, directed by Steven Spielberg.

  • - What kind of a shark is it?

  • - Let me see, I don't know.

  • I think it's a "mah-ko".

  • - Got a deep throat Pratt.

  • - Yeah, but what kind?

  • What kind of shark?

  • - It's a tiger shark.

  • - A what?

  • - A what?

  • - I love this scene because it is a crack-up.

  • The fellas around don't know what kind of shark it is,

  • they've allegedly been in the water their whole lives.

  • They're watermen, they're fishermen, they're boaters.

  • They don't know what kind of shark this is.

  • First of all that's really silly to me because

  • if they've been waterman their whole lives,

  • they know what a tiger shark, a white shark, a Mako.

  • It's not "mah-ko", it's mako.

  • - I think it's a "mah-ko".

  • - So they're pronouncing things incorrectly,

  • and that's not something lifelong watermen would do,

  • or waterwomen but in this case the scene has watermen.

  • - But the fact is that the bite radius on this animal

  • is different than the wounds on the victim.

  • - The thing about bite radius,

  • there is something to that.

  • Often when a shark bites a surfboard, a boat,

  • anything, a person,

  • you can figure out how large the shark was

  • based on the size of the mouth.

  • So there is something to the bite radius thing.

  • - C'mon fellas, let's be reasonable, huh?

  • This is not the time or the place

  • to perform some kind of a half-assed autopsy on a fish.

  • - A necropsy is actually what it's called

  • when you do an autopsy on an animal.

  • And to do an animal necropsy

  • you certainly wouldn't do it on the dock.

  • Unless you had a lab or a setting next to the dock,

  • where you weigh the animal out

  • and you do it properly by weighing and measuring.

  • So back when this film was made,

  • they absolutely would've put the shark on display and said

  • look here's the man-eater

  • that's been terrorizing the beaches.

  • However today fortunately,

  • that's not the case in the US

  • and many other places where sharks are protected,

  • because since this movie came out,

  • there are 75% fewer great white sharks in the ocean

  • largely because of fear, misinformation,

  • and movies like this.

  • But, fortunately, this movie is what inspired me

  • to grow up to become Matt Hooper, so it did good.

  • Peter Benchley, who wrote Jaws,

  • is a green conservationist.

  • He spent his life as a conservationist

  • for sharks and the ocean.

  • Didn't realize what a bell he would ring with this one,

  • and the film was just so good and so suspenseful

  • it made us all afraid of sharks.

  • This clip is from Deep Blue Sea, directed by Renny Harlin.

  • [metal scraping]

  • - How long have they been synchronized like this?

  • - So, the whole lab setup and genetically modifying sharks

  • that is pretty absurd.

  • I can't imagine anyone funding that for starters.

  • Making sharks smarter,

  • I can't think of a reason to do that,

  • without doing other research first.

  • So the whole notion of

  • genetically modifying sharks to be smarter,

  • and work together and mind control.

  • This reminded me of the Aquaman cartoons

  • when I was a little girl,

  • where he would just telepathically get animals to do

  • what they wanted.

  • And I think I bet the writer's an Aquaman fan too.

  • [intense music]

  • - Tell me I didn't see that.

  • They recognized that gun.

  • - An interesting thing a lot of people don't realize,

  • is that sharks are skittish.

  • Most wild animals are skittish.

  • They all have personalities,

  • and you'll come across some who are curious,

  • and others not so much.

  • Generally though, a wild shark is skittish of

  • something that's not its food or it hasn't seen.

  • For example, it would not recognize that

  • there is a gun pointed at it,

  • or that a person is doing something in its harm,

  • because that's kind of not part of its world.

  • I myself have been surfing,

  • and because a great white shark can't

  • see directly in front of him,

  • or directly behind him,

  • as soon as it turned a touch to see me,

  • it was just gone,

  • just super skittish.

  • And I've seen this behavior with all types of sharks,

  • nurse sharks, blacktips, reef sharks, hammerheads.

  • I've had more of them swim away from me

  • than I've had come towards me.

  • [gunshot]

  • [Apryl laughs]

  • Tough guy.

  • Oh, they got him.

  • I'm not quite sure what he shoots into the shark

  • to make it just pass out like that

  • and go up and all that's really silly.

  • So it's kind of not feasible at all.

  • This is, I would say this is almost 100 percent fiction.

  • - And I'm still starving.

  • - We're about to have a feeding frenzy.

  • [whimpers]

  • - Come on, let's get this over with.

  • - This is finding Nemo, directed by Andrew Stanton.

  • [bell dings]

  • - Right then.

  • The meeting has officially come to order.

  • Let us all say the pledge.

  • - [In unison] I am a nice shark.

  • Not a mindless eating machine.

  • If I am to change this image,

  • I must first change myself.

  • Fish are friends, not food.

  • - What I do love about finding Nemo is

  • they try to portray a different side of the shark with the

  • "fish are friends, not food".

  • I can't tell you how many students have said that to me

  • because of Finding Nemo.

  • And I think that's great because it's showing that

  • hey look, the sharks are trying to care,

  • we should care,

  • and I think it's trying to send

  • a bigger environmental message.

  • But showing you that sharks can be

  • quote-unquote humanized

  • to where they're cuddly or friendly.

  • Which is why conversation is hampered,

  • because they're thought of as

  • eating machines, killers, et cetera.

  • So this humanization if you will,

  • I think was great 'cause it kind of

  • gave kids a less scary intro to sharks.

  • In a way that wasn't so much like

  • yes, they're going to eat you no matter what.

  • - Now do you all have your friends?

  • - Got mine.

  • [whimpers]

  • - A lot of sharks have very

  • symbiotic relationships with other fish.

  • You'll see pilot fish

  • and you'll see remora stuck to the bottom of sharks.

  • So those are both kind of

  • really great symbiotic relationships.

  • The pilot fish and the remoras

  • are not part of the sharks food,

  • they don't think to eat them.

  • So they hang around and get protection

  • from the shark and pick up scraps.

  • They're very specific eaters,

  • great whites, hammerheads, everyone,

  • they have their specific niche in the ecosystem,

  • so they don't just eat everything.

  • So they do have relationships with other fish.

  • - That's mine give it back!

  • - Dory cut it out!

  • - Give me-

  • Ow!

  • - Oh I'm sorry, are you okay?

  • - Ow ow ow.

  • - I'm so sorry.

  • - Yeah you really clocked me there.

  • Am I bleeding?

  • - Oh.

  • - Ow.

  • - Here we go.

  • - Dory, are you okay?

  • Oh that's good.

  • - [Together] Intervention!

  • - The little tiny bit of blood

  • that goes into Bruce's nose

  • and he inevitably is drawn into a frenzy.

  • Which is one of the best shark myths that scares everybody.

  • And I have to say,

  • I've used it to my advantage before

  • to get people out of the line up surfing.

  • Oh you have a cut you better get out.

  • More waves for me.

  • But honestly,

  • if I could cut my finger,

  • stick it in the water,

  • and have white sharks or any other sharks come to me,

  • imagine how easy my research would be.

  • How easy would it be to attract them?

  • The truth is,

  • there's a whole cacophony of smell out there

  • and while sharks can detect

  • a small amount of blood in

  • an Olympic sized swimming pool,

  • that doesn't mean that's what drives them to go and eat.

  • Great whites in particular are very picky eaters.

  • They don't simply eat everything.

  • Its a little more complicated than that,

  • they're not just indiscriminate eaters.

  • Yes, tiger sharks and bulls

  • are sometimes known as garbage cans of the sea

  • and they'll eat everything.

  • White shark's far more picky.

  • So every shark has its specific food.

  • And again, we have another clip from Jaws.

  • [crash]

  • [intense music]

  • Oh lost the spear.

  • [Apryl laughs]

  • So the shark in Jaws is a great white.

  • And we do cage dive,

  • or use cages to observe great white sharks in the wild,

  • however, most of the time

  • the cage is attached to the back of the boat,

  • there are those that go down by themselves

  • farther into the water,

  • but they're not as flimsy as it appears.

  • The shark simply bumped into it,

  • and the cage falls apart.

  • It's far safer than you think.

  • And interestingly,

  • I have never seen a great white

  • or any other shark attack like that.

  • It seems like in movies they're made to like,

  • act like a dog.

  • I've seen them like,

  • take something and

  • [growls]

  • or like keep going and

  • [growls]

  • and that's just