Placeholder Image

Subtitles section Play video

  • So, you're in lockdown,

  • you've gone to the supermarket,

  • and maybe you've bought way too many eggs.

  • And you're looking for a way to make them last.

  • I wanted to look at all the different ways

  • you can make your eggs last,

  • from one week all the way up to a year

  • and more if possible.

  • Are these techniques any good?

  • Do they work at all?

  • And is it worth it?

  • Once you've cooked an egg,

  • you're not going to get much of a lifespan out of it.

  • But with this method, you might just be able

  • to make it last a little bit longer.

  • These eggs are incredibly easy to make

  • and will last for about a week in the fridge.

  • So, the process for this is really simple

  • and only needs two ingredients:

  • boiled eggs and miso paste.

  • Getting hold of certain things in lockdown has been tough.

  • I grabbed the only miso paste I could,

  • which probably isn't quite right for this.

  • A less sticky white miso might have been easier,

  • as this stuff really stuck to my hands,

  • and the white miso is generally less salty as well,

  • so it might've worked better with the egg.

  • But either way, I'm gonna completely cover the eggs

  • in the paste.

  • Then once the eggs are covered,

  • I'll put them in the fridge.

  • That's it.

  • I got this recipe from the book

  • "Preserving the Japanese Way,"

  • which is really great for all things preservation.

  • The recipe says not to leave the eggs wrapped up

  • for more than four hours.

  • I found that the longer you leave them,

  • the saltier they get.

  • If you're using them as a topping,

  • they're just about OK to leave overnight,

  • but by themselves they get too salty.

  • Overall, though, these were a big success.

  • They were so easy to make, and the result was a rich,

  • miso-flavored egg that's great on top of ramen

  • or as a snack with a beer.

  • It does use quite a lot of miso,

  • but you can reuse this to coat more eggs.

  • If you want your eggs to last longer than a week,

  • you're probably gonna need some salt.

  • And salted eggs have been around for quite a long time,

  • especially in Asian cooking.

  • You find salted egg yolks in the middle of moon cakes

  • or on top of a congee.

  • But recently, salted egg yolks have become really trendy,

  • and you'll find recipes for them popping up everywhere.

  • The process is pretty simple.

  • You surround the egg yolk in salt,

  • drawing out all the moisture and preserving it.

  • Again, you only really need

  • two ingredients for this recipe,

  • salt and eggs.

  • Some recipes I found just used the salt.

  • Some go as far as 50-50 salt to sugar.

  • I landed somewhere in between

  • and added a bit of sugar to take the edge off.

  • I've seen a lot of people add flavorings too,

  • so I threw some mixed herbs and chili in as an experiment,

  • but I can't see the yolk

  • getting a huge amount of flavor from them.

  • So, that's the base.

  • Then we're gonna make some imprints with an egg

  • and then gently place each yolk into these.

  • Make sure each is completely covered with salt

  • before leaving for a few days in the fridge.

  • After about three days,

  • my yolks had almost completely solidified.

  • They're still fairly sticky at this point.

  • If I was doing this again,

  • I might have left them for longer.

  • But once they're out of the salt,

  • they just need some further drying.

  • It's really nice and warm at the moment,

  • so I just wrapped the yolks in muslin

  • and hung them up in my kitchen.

  • But if you're doing this at home,

  • you can also put them in the oven

  • on a very, very low heat

  • or use a dehydrator to dry them out.

  • I have put them in the oven when making this ages ago

  • and completely forgot about them.

  • So if you are doing this in the oven,

  • maybe set a timer.

  • And this is the result:

  • a grate-able egg yolk that looks and acts

  • almost like a hard cheese.

  • They don't taste as eggy as you might think

  • and just add an extra bit of depth

  • to whatever you grate them on.

  • I think overall they were pretty fun and easy to make,

  • and I'll definitely be making them again.

  • To make our egg last even longer,

  • I'm gonna try fermenting it.

  • Now, you can easily just put a boiled egg

  • in some salted water with a starter culture,

  • and it should ferment by itself.

  • But I'm gonna be using old jars of kimchi and sauerkraut

  • that I have lying around,

  • and I'm gonna put the eggs directly into that.

  • Hopefully this will speed up the process

  • and give the egg that sauerkraut taste.

  • Now, if you don't have anything fermenting

  • and you don't really know what the best option is,

  • making some kimchi at home is actually pretty easy.

  • The only specialty item you need is gochugaru,

  • a dried red chili powder.

  • Everything else is easy to get hold of.

  • And if you've never considered making it,

  • it's surprisingly quick to throw together.

  • You need Chinese cabbage,

  • ginger, the gochugaru,

  • garlic, and spring onion.

  • I used a white onion because, again, with lockdown,

  • I couldn't get spring onions at short notice.

  • Just mix all these ingredients together in a bowl.

  • You can be completely free with the quantities,

  • as long as you weigh the total.

  • And add three percent of that total weight in salt.

  • Mix together and leave it for an hour or so.

  • I also added some fish sauce,

  • but that's completely optional.

  • And once it's all together,

  • place it in a jar to ferment.

  • Make sure that the ingredients are all covered by liquid,

  • and leave it for a couple of weeks.

  • I've always got piles of jars of things fermenting away,

  • taking up all the kitchen space.

  • I've got lots of fresh vegetables from the allotment,

  • and inevitably it goes bad if I don't do something with it.

  • I've got a couple of older jars happily fermenting away.

  • So, really, all I need to do is add the eggs.

  • I made a solution of 2% salt water

  • to top up the ongoing jars

  • and to make sure they would all be

  • completely covered in liquid.

  • And then simply drop the eggs in.

  • After about a week of fermentation, the eggs are ready.

  • How long they last, though, seems to be up for debate.

  • People online claim everything from two weeks

  • up to a very ambitious year long.

  • But they should last a week fermenting

  • and about a month in the fridge.

  • Fermented eggs might not be for everyone.

  • The taste of the egg and whatever you're fermenting them in

  • is actually really nice,

  • but the egg itself can end up being

  • a little bit fizzy.

  • I've seen a few places saying this,

  • so it's not just mine, clearly.

  • And a fizzy egg is not something

  • that I'd be desperate to make again.

  • I was looking for something that might last

  • more than a couple of months,

  • so I turned to the good old pickled egg.

  • This one's probably the easiest on the list,

  • and I made it even easier

  • by buying ready-to-use pickling vinegar.

  • You can get this in almost any UK supermarket.

  • I don't know about the US.

  • But it's extra-strength malt vinegar that's already spiced.

  • You can even just use the jar it comes in.

  • I added a couple of extra cloves and a black cardamom pod

  • for a little bit of extra spice.

  • But you can simply boil the eggs, peel them,

  • and put them in the vinegar.

  • If you've never had a pickled egg before,

  • the result is vinegary, spicy,

  • and perfect as a snack.

  • If you're looking for an easy way

  • to get a long life out of your eggs,

  • this is probably the easiest and best option.

  • And they should last for about six months in the jar.

  • If pickling is one of the easiest ways

  • to preserve your eggs, this one's probably the most effort.

  • Chinese century eggs have been around for about 600 years,

  • and when done right, they're black, gelatinous,

  • and, frankly, look quite unappealing.

  • I wanted to see how easy it was

  • to actually make these eggs at home.

  • I didn't really know where to start

  • with the century egg.

  • Looking online, it seems there are a lot

  • of different methods.

  • In the end, I decided to just use pure sodium hydroxide.

  • Now, sodium hydroxide is caustic.

  • It can be harmful to breathe in

  • and can burn your skin.

  • So when using it, you need to wear goggles,

  • a face mask, and gloves.

  • Getting a face mask at the moment

  • isn't the easiest thing ever,

  • and it turns out I only had two left gloves.

  • I looked around online and found some recipes

  • using similar sodium hydroxide to me

  • and some using drain cleaner,

  • which I really wouldn't recommend.

  • A lot of other information I found online

  • also seemed wrong or really dangerous.

  • Boiling the mixture caused it to violently bubble,

  • almost spilling over the pan.

  • Putting the mixture into a glass container is dangerous,

  • as sodium hydroxide can actually eat away at the glass.

  • And using an aluminum pan is even more dangerous,

  • as the liquid can react with the aluminum

  • and make a toxic gas.

  • All in all, compared to the other methods,

  • this is looking like it's far from worth doing at home.

  • So once I had the mixture

  • of sodium hydroxide, salt, and tea,

  • I poured it over the eggs and left them to sit for 10 days.

  • 10 days later, the eggs have definitely changed a lot.

  • They're darker, and you can see where the mixture

  • has entered the pores.

  • After the first 10 days,

  • the eggs were ready to remove from the liquid and wrap up.

  • Traditionally, the eggs were made

  • by being buried in a mixture of wood ash,

  • lime, salt, and clay.

  • So I grabbed some ash from my allotment

  • and bought some modeling clay, which I could use

  • to wrap the eggs up in.

  • Each egg was carefully wrapped up in this clay mixture

  • and left for another 10 days.

  • Now, I do a lot of stupid experiments in the kitchen,

  • but I've never done anything even remotely like this.

  • So, after 20 days,

  • I should have a final result.

  • Batch No. 2.

  • It's the backup batch.

  • These have been in here for...

  • 11, 12 days now.

  • I mean, I already checked how this one's doing,

  • and it looks far more solid than the last batch.

  • So there's a glimmer of hope here.

  • Perhaps it's a fresher egg.

  • I think that's probably as close as I'm getting.

  • I'm not going to try this weird, semi-jelly egg,

  • so I don't know what