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  • Hello and welcome to News Review.

  • I'm Rob and joining me today is Catherinehello Catherine!

  • Hello Rob and hello everybody. Yes we've

  • got a great story today about a female politician who's making

  • history in the United States.

  • Great and if you want to test yourself

  • on the vocabulary that we're going to be talking about today

  • there's a quiz on our website at bbclearningenglish.com

  • but before you go there let's have a listen to today's news story with this

  • BBC News report:

  • Yes, so Kamala Harris is making history in the United States.

  • She is the first Black, Asian woman to accept a nomination

  • to run as vice president in the American elections.

  • Yes. And we've got

  • three words to talk about today to help you talk about this story.

  • What are they Catherine?

  • They are: 'nod', 'mongering' and 'blasts'.

  • So, that's 'nod', 'mongering' and 'blasts'.

  • OK. Well, let's start with your first headline please.

  • Of course, and we're starting with the

  • International Writers' websitethe headline:

  • OK. So, that's 'nod' – official act to suggest that someone should be given a prize or position.

  • That's right. It's a three-letter word: 'nod' – N-O-D.

  • It's a noun and it describes a movement.

  • Rob, do you like biscuits?

  • I do. You're nodding your head, aren't you?

  • Moving up... I amup and downyes to mean 'yes'.

  • Yes, OK. And Rob, can I have your biscuits please?

  • Er no! Shaking your headthis movement

  • in a lot of cultures means 'no'. So, left to right is 'no'.

  • Up and down means 'yes'. And that's the idea

  • of 'nod', when we use it in this sense. It's not a head movement, but it is an

  • agreement. It is saying yes: in this case saying yes

  • to somebody doing something of importance,

  • or somebody getting a position of importance:

  • maybe a recognition, maybe a promotion. It's when somebody gets

  • something good that is given to them.

  • OK. So, it's not just a physical nod

  • it's not just somebody going: 'Yes, you've done well.'

  • No, no it's not. In fact, you can give somebody a nod by talking

  • to them, by giving them a phone call, by an email,

  • maybe by an announcement in a newspaper or somewhere else.

  • So, you 'give somebody the nod' that they are

  • able to do something, or they've received a recognition,

  • or they've won a prize, or in this case they've been recognised as

  • worthy of being the candidate.

  • Right. Now, I went for a promotion in the

  • department last week to be head of biscuits and...

  • Really?? Yes, and the good news is

  • that the boss gave me the nod.

  • You got the nod? Fantastic! I got the nod.

  • You got the nod. ...I got the job.

  • Fantasticooh, by phone call? So, you got the nod by a phone call?

  • By phone call, yeah. I've got a job which means... And nowbrilliant.

  • ...good quality biscuits all round in the office now.

  • Can't wait.

  • OK. Well, should we have a summary of the word 'nod'?

  • So, we've been talking about people giving us the nod but you can also

  • 'give us a bell'. That's another expression, isn't it Catherine?

  • It is and to find out what it means and how to use it

  • just click the link.

  • OK. Time now to look at our next headline.

  • And next up we've got the Guardian here

  • in the UKthe headline:

  • OK. So, that's 'mongering' – encouraging an activity that is damaging or hurtful.

  • Yes. So, the spelling is: M-O-N-G-E-R-I-N-G – the pronunciation is 'mongering'

  • and we always use this word

  • with a noun in front of it and a hyphen. So, in this case 'fear-mongering'.

  • Now Rob, do you like fish?

  • Yes, I love fish.

  • Where do you buy your fish?

  • I go to a fishmongers: an expert in fish

  • somebody who really knows their fish. ...and sells it.

  • OK. Do you like tools?

  • Hand tools: hammers and nails and things.

  • I do. I have plenty in my shed.

  • Where do you buy them?

  • I buy them at an ironmongers.

  • An ironmongerssomebody who works with and sells metal

  • objects made of iron. Less common these days,

  • but a fishmonger and an ironmonger are people who sell

  • fish and iron. Now, we're not talking about

  • real things that you can holdlike fish and ironhere,

  • but what we are talking about is somebody who

  • spreads and perpetuates feelings like fear, like worry,

  • like doom. It's thingsso, if you're a 'fear-mongerer'

  • you make people afraid: you say things to make them

  • more fearful than they need to be. You concentrate on the negative.

  • You spreadyou can be a worry-mongerer

  • and you make people worry by saying worrying things to them.

  • You can also have... You're not selling worryyou're not selling fear.

  • You're not selling it in the sense of money,

  • but you are selling it in the way that more

  • and moreyou want more and more people to have it.

  • It's just some people do it. Some people look on the bad side of things.

  • Some people alsoif you're fear-mongeringoften they think it's the

  • right thing to do. If you're making people worried about

  • something, it's often because you think it's a very worrying thing, but

  • other people might see it differently and say:

  • 'Actually, there isn't anything to worry about. You're just a worry-mongerer.'

  • And there was some rumour-mongering going on

  • during the coronavirus pandemic, I found.

  • Quite a lot. Yeah, particularly about toilet rolls,

  • I noticed. There were rumours going on that

  • the supermarkets were going to sell out

  • of toilet rolls, so I got down to the supermarket – I joined a long queue.

  • When I got in I found that there were loads of toilet rolls for sale, so it was

  • just rumour-mongering that got everybody in a bit of a panic, I suppose.

  • Well, yes, around your way, yes. If everyone was saying there's no toilet rolls and

  • then there was, somebody was rumour-mongering, yes.

  • OK. Well, should we have a summary of that word, now?

  • Let's do that.

  • Well, if you like all this talk about US elections and politics, we talked about

  • another story a few weeks ago with Kanye West, who wanted to be

  • president of the US. How do we find that story, Catherine?

  • As always, to find out more just click on the link

  • and you'll go straight there. Down below.

  • OK. Let's have your next headline, please.

  • And next we're going to BBC News, here in

  • the UKthe headline:

  • 'Blasts' – severely criticises.

  • Yes. Now the spelling here is B-L-A-S-T-S – the pronunciation:

  • I say 'blasts' but Rob you say... 'Blasts'.

  • 'Blasts' – so I say it with 'a' sound and you say it with an...

  • 'Ah' sound. So, which one is correct?

  • Which is correct? They're both correct Rob.

  • My 'a' is the British Northern 'a' sound and your 'ah' is...

  • A British Southern accent: 'blasts'. Yes.

  • And both of them are fine. You can say

  • 'blasts', you can say 'blasts' – it's the same word. People will

  • understand you, so choose the one you like.

  • So... I know – I know about this word 'blasts'.

  • It's to do with cannons and rockets blasting off into space, isn't it?

  • That's right, yes. A blast is a big explosion.

  • So, you can talk about a blast from a gun

  • or rockets going into space is a blast-off.

  • So, it's a word of power and

  • force, but we're using it here not to talk about

  • real explosions: we're using it here to talk about anger.

  • Angry outbursts: when you shout at someone, you get very cross with

  • them, you have a lot of criticism, you're very vocal,

  • you're quitealmost quite scary. You really tell someone

  • that you're not happy with them: you're blasting them.

  • So you're very angry.

  • Yes. When did you last blast someone, Rob?

  • Well, when I went to the pub the other

  • night the landlord pulled me a pint out, but he didn't

  • fill the glass to the top. There was a bit missing – I didn't get my full pint.

  • Ooh. And you went really crazy, did you?

  • Yeah. I had to blast the landlord there and tell him this isn't fair.

  • So, are you allowed back into the pub now after blasting the landlord?

  • Unfortunately not. I think I'm gonna have to try somewhere else for my pint of beer.

  • You're gonna have to say sorry

  • because 'blasting' is not something you do to someone in an everyday situation.

  • If you do, you really have to apologise if you wanted to stay friends with them.

  • It's a very strong word. That's why newspapers

  • like it. And it's the idea of really strong criticism, so if you blast someone

  • in real life they probably won't speak to you again.

  • ...or you'll have some apologising to do.

  • Choose your moment.

  • Yes.

  • OKgood. Well, let's have a summary of 'blasts'.

  • OK. Catherine, it's time now for you to recap the vocabulary

  • that we've talked about today, please.

  • Yes. We had 'nod' – official act to suggest that someone should be given a prize or position.

  • We had 'mongering' – encouraging an activity that is damaging or hurtful.

  • And 'blasts' – severely criticises.

  • If you want to test yourself

  • on the vocabulary that we've been talking about today, we have a quiz

  • on our website at bbclearningenglish.com

  • and don't forget we've got lots of Learning English materials all over social media.

  • Well, thanks for joining us today. Bye-bye. Bye Catherine.

  • Bye!

Hello and welcome to News Review.

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Kamala Harris makes history - News Review

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/11/09
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