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  • tell me about your prison.

  • You know, your jail time and then ultimately your your decision to leave the life.

  • I know you first had a first charge that you went in for, but that didn't seem to, you know, completely alter your life Until was that second sentence can you tell us about You know how that ended up happening?

  • Did you think that you would never get caught?

  • Or was everything starting to come down with the Rico on the Giuliani that you knew it was only a matter of time?

  • Yeah.

  • You know, I mean, look, I had, you know, pretty pretty rough record and, man, I was arrested 17, 18 times, and I had I went to trial five times and he each trial ended either in a acquittal or dismissal.

  • And the big the big thing for me, it was beating the Giuliani case.

  • Because if I lost that case, hey would have given me probably 50 years because I was one of the lead defendants, and we're I was acquitted.

  • My co defendant was convicted and they got 30 years on the lead defendant.

  • What?

  • I got at least 50 when my life would have been over basically because out of 50 had to do 30 35.

  • So what has been done?

  • But, you know, that really put it in my head.

  • And then when I got indicted on the whole gasoline racketeering case, that came, you know, shortly after the acquittal on the Giuliani case, I I just realized I said, Look, I'm not gonna last, you know?

  • So my thing is, let me try to wrap everything up.

  • The government really wanted a conviction on me, especially after I beat the Giuliani occasion.

  • You know, in a way, Brian, this is interesting.

  • Giuliani helped me a lot.

  • I'll tell you why.

  • My partner, I rizzo in the gas business.

  • He became an informant and he was testifying against me in the whole gasoline taste.

  • They indicted me based upon, You know, his cooperation.

  • Well, what happened when I went to trial in Giuliani and Giuliani found out that we had that the eastern district he was in the southern district, the eastern district had him as a witness they want did him to testify in Giuliani's case.

  • And from what I understand, there was a big argument over it because the Eastern district did not want to give up their witness.

  • They went toe Washington Giuliani one, He testifies against me.

  • We destroyed him on the stand.

  • I get acquitted.

  • So now the government in the Eastern District case, there's worried.

  • We just destroyed their main witness.

  • That's why, in my opinion, they were able to or they wanted to do a deal with me.

  • Otherwise they would never did a deal.

  • They were taking me to trial where they wouldn't have taken less than 25 years.

  • But as a result of that, I was able to make a deal.

  • For 10 years, I was under the old law, meaning I still could have made parole.

  • E had a $15 million restitution forfeiture.

  • I gave up a lot of assets that I had at the time in connection with that, and I figured, Okay, I'll wrap everything up.

  • I'll move out to California when I get out of prison on Get away from the light on.

  • And that was my plan.

  • Excuse me.

  • That's how I was gonna work this all out because I knew the life was in serious trouble, and that's what you did in the end That's what I ended up doing.

  • Yeah, I used the, you know, because look, I knew when I got out on parole, I could use that as an excuse not to report back to Brooklyn because it's a violation, you know, if you're associating with anybody.

  • So I figured out I'm out in California.

  • Maybe everybody will forget about me, and I live happily ever after with my new wife.

  • And that would be it.

  • And so that was the plan.

  • That's that's how I had it laid out.

  • Now it didn't actually work out that way.

  • You know, uh, but eventually it did.

  • But initially it didn't, right?

  • I mean, you know, you talk about being in that second time and then throwing you into solitary confinement where, you know, basically something, and you kind of broke or snapped, and then you're in there with a Bible, and you really had a something changed.

  • You had, like, an epiphany within yourself.

  • And, you know, it's interesting listening to you, Michael.

  • It sounds like, you know, it's very difficult to be in that life, you know?

  • I know a lot of guys.

  • I met a lot of people over the years and business and, you know, hardcore ultra marathoners and stuff like that.

  • But to live that life where you gotta hold everything inside, you can't necessarily even trust the guys around you, even your own father.

  • You've got the government coming after you.

  • You're on trial.

  • It's this whole game.

  • You know, it seems to me that's very few men.

  • Consist, ain that mental pressure over a long period of time.

  • And I'm on that on top of the fact that you're in solitary and you're having this epiphany, I don't know, tell us about that moment.

  • And, um, I incorrect in assuming that that mental pressure, it's gonna it's gonna get you at some point.

  • Yeah, I mean, and I saw that happened to a lot of guys, Brian, but I did five years.

  • I got out on parole, was on parole for about 13 months, and it was really the worst time of my life as a free person because I was basically dodging bullets.

  • She became, you know, public that I was walking away from the life Boston.

  • My family called my person go immediate contract on my life.

  • He took it very personal When I walked away.

  • My father, you know, the feds come into prison.

  • Say, your father went along with the contract and again, you know, knowing my father as well as I did, he probably just said, Hey, if my son is gonna, you know, do this, What could I dio?

  • That's how he would have dealt with it, you know?

  • So he didn't argue it.

  • He didn't fight it at that time.

  • And eso I was in trouble, you know, I was dodging bullets.

  • I mean, they did send some people out to get me out of leave my house a couple of times, and, you know, New York still.

  • Are you still in New York for that?

  • 13 California?

  • I wouldn't have made it in New York.

  • There's no way I would have been able to do this in New York because it was too exposed there.

  • But, you know, and then it was trying to make a living.

  • You know, I still had a huge I had so many things going bad.

  • So I violated my parole, and the government was upset with me because they had picked me up in the morning and brought me into Newark.

  • New Jersey to testify in a trial against the Boston Jersey John Riggi, who was a dear friend of mine.

  • And John and I had a deal where we were collecting a tariff on every window that came into any building in Manhattan.

  • We had a tariff attached to it.

  • And what happened was one of the guys that was involved in that was a co defendant in mind on the Giuliani case.

  • He gets convicted and he turns informant.

  • So he tells the government that me and Ricky were partners.

  • So the government brings me in and they say you're gonna testify against Riggi because we have all this information or you're gonna were gonna lock you up for perjury.

  • We're gonna indict you in the case.

  • Bottom line, they bring me in there.

  • I don't testify.

  • They send me back to California, refused.

  • They send me back to California.

  • And within 10 days or so, I'm violated on my parole.

  • They were very upset with me.

  • We're bringing new charges against you.

  • You'll never see the street again.

  • You're done.

  • And that's it.

  • They I mean, they threaten me with murder charges and everything else.

  • So that night you know, they put me in a hole in California jail, and they were gonna bring me back to Brooklyn, where my case waas and honestly, Brian, it was the worst night of my life.

  • I said, look, you know, I was just married.

  • Only three.

  • I got married in July to my wife.

  • My current wife.

  • 35 years We're married.

  • I said we have a baby.

  • I'm never going to see my wife again.

  • You know the girl I did this all for?

  • I'm gonna lose her now.

  • She waited for me for five years, 13 months on parole.

  • Now I'm gone again.

  • I said they can't put me out on the yard.

  • I got people looking to kill me.

  • I'm going to spend the rest of my life in a six by eight cell.

  • So, you know, it was a scary feeling.

  • I'm gonna be honest with you.

  • I mean, I should you know, I'm hopeless.

  • What am I gonna do now?

  • It's done.

  • I'm finished.

  • And I don't care what anybody says, you know?

  • Look, I did almost three years in the whole, it's tough to be in some solitary like that.

  • And when you think you're going to spend the rest of your life in there.

  • You know?

  • E mean depression, whatever you wanna call it.

  • It was rough.

  • And that night, Yeah.

  • I mean, I you know, I say this all the time to Brian.

  • I used to demean people.

  • That was suicidal.

  • I did.

  • I said, they're weak.

  • They can't face up to their troubles.

  • It's weakness.

  • I don't do that anymore.

  • Now, I wasn't suicidal that night.

  • I wasn't that brave.

  • But I can tell you, I wanted to lay my head on that big Kat and just not wake up.

  • It was too painful to think of my future.

  • I said, this is it.

  • And, you know, long story short.

  • I told this thousands of times and speaking events.

  • A prison guard came by and and just push the Bible through the slot on the door, and I picked it up, and it was a life changing experience for me.

  • Not immediately, but I spent 29 months and seven days in that hole.

  • And it was during that time that you know, my life and my everything changed.

  • You can call it an epiphany or a realization or, you know, come to Jesus moment, but it had a major impact on me.

  • That's less than 25 years.

  • How much my wife Wow, stop my wife.

tell me about your prison.

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DOING TIME: What It Was Like Going To Prison & Why I Left The Mob Life - Michael Franzese

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/11/07
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