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  • So, E, I'm going to read this passage to you and...

  • "I'm all ears"?

  • Hi. James from engVid.

  • Today I'm going to use "all" in phrases and idioms, and teach you how you can use them

  • in common speech.

  • And I'm going to try and put them into sections that you will find most useful to help you

  • remember.

  • E writes...

  • Is saying right now: "He's all ears", and I bet you want to know what that means.

  • I'll explain that to you, and I have another seven other idioms.

  • Let's go to the board.

  • So, E's all ears.

  • Before we even start, let's talk about: What is "all"?

  • What does it mean?

  • Well, generally, it means as much as possible, or it can mean complete or whole.

  • The whole thing; all thing; complete.

  • Excuse me.

  • Or the parts of it.

  • Now, we understand that, what does an "idiom" mean?

  • An "idiom" is basically...

  • It could be a phrase or a clause, but it's a bunch of words that are together that when

  • you hear them, they don't actually make sense by themselves; but if you have the history

  • behind it, you get it.

  • One of my favourite ones to tell people is: "It's raining cats and dogs."

  • Clearly, dogs and cats don't fall from the sky, so you have to say: "What does that mean?"

  • Well, it means it's a lot of rain.

  • Okay?

  • So, there's a lot of rain coming down.

  • Now, it has an ancient...

  • Not ancient roots.

  • From, like 1600/1700s that there would be so much water coming down that dogs and cats

  • might, like, float away or, you know, be swimming down the streets, so that's: "It's raining

  • cats and dogs."

  • What does that have to do with what we're doing now?

  • Well, today, we want to look at "all" and how "all" can be used in different idioms

  • to have different meanings.

  • You probably won't know what they mean right away; but by the time I'm done, it shouldn't

  • be a problem.

  • So, let's look at the number one, the first one: I want to talk about emotional states.

  • So, it's a mental state or an emotional state; how you think or feel.

  • So, number one is: "It's all in your head."

  • That means imaginary; it's not real.

  • If something's all in your head, you go: "Oh, I think I have, like", I don't know.

  • I...

  • I don't want to say it because I don't want to give myself a disease.

  • People might say: "Oh, I think I'm growing four heads."

  • It's like: "It's all in your head.

  • It's your imagination.

  • It's not real.

  • It's not happening.

  • It's not going to happen."

  • Okay?

  • Or: "I think...

  • Oh, I think Beyoncé is going to leave her husband and meet me, because she was on a

  • TV program and she winked twice.

  • That was her code that she wants me."

  • It's in my head; it's not going to happen.

  • Okay?

  • Your friends will say: "You're crazy.

  • It's not happening."

  • What's another one?

  • We'll go down to number two.

  • Oh, sorry.

  • Before we go here, we'll go here: "All shook up".

  • Oh, yeah, yeah, I'm all shook up.

  • Those of you who like Elvis, that's an Elvis song: "All Shook Up".

  • What does "all shook up" mean?

  • Well, it's to shake...

  • "Shake" means to...

  • To disturb something.

  • In this case, to make it extremely excited.

  • You could be extremely excited if you win the lottery.

  • If I won 20 million dollars, I'd be all shook up, I'd be like: "What am I going to do?

  • I...

  • I...

  • I...

  • How...?

  • How do I get...?"

  • I'm excited.

  • I can also be very worried or disturbed when I'm all shook up.

  • If you get very bad news...

  • My baseball team, the Boston Red Sox, they lost again - I'm all shook up; I'm emotionally

  • disturbed.

  • Okay?

  • And you can be worried as well.

  • So that's emotional state with "all".

  • "All in your head".

  • Remember we said completely?

  • It's completely in your head.

  • "You're all shook up", it means as much as possible you've been disturbed.

  • Let's look to the other ones.

  • So, we talked about mental state, your emotional state; let's look at knowledge - how much

  • you can know.

  • All right?

  • So, if "somebody's not all there", you're not all there, it means it's not working properly.

  • Imagine if you had a car with four wheels, but only three tires.

  • They're not all there; something's missing.

  • You need one more tire to make four tires, four wheels.

  • Makes sense.

  • When somebody's not all there, something's wrong in the cabeza.

  • In the head, there's something missing.

  • Maybe half a brain.

  • You know?

  • You got to be careful.

  • If somebody goes: "Hey, watch out for E. He's not all there", it means he could be crazy.

  • Okay?

  • He could be not focused on the work.

  • And the other one, sometimes people say it, like: "That guy's not all there."

  • You stupid, you's very stupid.

  • Okay?

  • Because you only have half a brain so you can't think like other people.

  • Sorry, that just seems mean, but in case people say it, that's what they mean.

  • Now, the next thing about knowledge we're going to talk about is this one.

  • Okay?

  • If somebody says: "For all I know", it means: "For the knowledge that I have currently,

  • right now at this moment, all the information I have, this is what I believe will happen."

  • So I'm talking about knowledge, and it's like...

  • It's, like, my opinion on something that might happen.

  • So: "For all I know, that girl's going to get married to somebody else because she left me."

  • What do I know?

  • She left me, so then I'm guessing: "For all I know, based on my information of she left

  • me, she might get married."

  • Doesn't mean it's true; it's kind of my opinion based on what I know now.

  • "For all I know, this might be a great opportunity."

  • It means: All the information I have says it, but it doesn't necessarily mean it's true.

  • Usually when people say: "For all I know", it's used in a negative sense.

  • People don't go: "For all I know I could be rich."

  • Not usually.

  • It's usually negative.

  • "For all I know, that guy should be killed."

  • Okay?

  • Or will be killed.

  • "Know-it-all".

  • Hmm, that seems pretty good, right?

  • You're a know-it-all.

  • Actually, no.

  • A "know-it-all", and I did the short version, but I'll give you the long version to know

  • what a know-it-all is.

  • A "know-it-all" is someone who seems to have a lot of knowledge, tells everybody that they

  • have all the knowledge, and it irritates everybody that they have so much knowledge because not

  • everybody thinks they have all the knowledge that they have.

  • Do you want me to repeat that?

  • I'm not going to because I don't know how to say all of that again.

  • That is what a know-it-all is.

  • It's somebody who thinks they know all the answers, and they make sure they let everybody

  • else know this, but not everybody agrees.

  • So, if someone calls you a "know-it-all", it's not a compliment.

  • So, if you're like...

  • I go: "Hey, you're a know-it-all", you go: "Yes, it's true; I know everything.

  • That's what all the people say to me, I'm a know-it-all because I know all" - they're

  • insulting you.

  • It's something we don't like.

  • Okay?

  • So, we've gone from mental state, emotionally, imagining things, and being, you know, excited

  • or worried about something, to amount of knowledge you have.

  • And let's see how this would play into work as we shift over her, and we talk about work

  • and "all".

  • Okay?

  • Now, when "somebody pulls an all-nighter", it means to go from the evening, say about

  • 5 o'clock, all the way through the night to the next day.

  • It means to continually work through the night; not to stop.

  • Usually you do this in high-...

  • Not high school.

  • Yeah, high school and university.

  • You've got an essay to do, it's due the next day, you're like: "I'm never going to get

  • this done.

  • I've got to pull an all-nighter."

  • That's when you get a Red Bull or a coffee, you drink it, and you work all night to the

  • next day.

  • Cool?

  • Now, if something was an "all-nighter", it means it took all night.

  • So if you went to a party that was an all-nighter, the party didn't end at 2 o'clock in the morning;

  • it went from 5, 6, 7, it went on into the next day into the morning; it was an all-nighter.

  • Okay?

  • So, it's all night.

  • So, we've got "night".

  • Let's go to the opposite of "night", which is "day".

  • Okay?

  • "It's all in a day's work".

  • What does it mean: "It's all in a day's work"?

  • I heard one person say: "'All in a day's work' means easy."

  • That's not quite correct.

  • So, if you ever see that person, you should think carefully what they're saying.

  • It means that there's a job that's a usual job in my work which is actually quite difficult

  • or unpleasant.

  • I don't...

  • You know, so anybody else would go: "Ugh".

  • So, when you're a garbageman, okay?

  • You pick up garbage - sometimes it has dirty nappies.

  • It means little babies have went poo-poo and pee-pee in this, and you got to pick it up

  • and throw it in the truck.

  • And I go: "Oh, geez, oh, god, man.

  • Oh!

  • I'd kill myself if I had to do that."

  • You go: "Hey, dude.

  • It's all in a day's work.

  • It's just what I do."

  • It doesn't mean it's easy; it means it's a regular task or a regular thing I got to do

  • every day.

  • It's just in my day.

  • Okay?

  • Sometimes you have a stupid boss.

  • Yeah, you got a stupid boss and you got to look at the boss every day, and you go: "[Laughs]

  • It's all in a day's work.

  • It's all in a day's work."

  • It's an unpleasant task or an unpleasant thing to do.

  • By the way, the word "task" means job.

  • It means something that you have to do.

  • Okay?

  • It's not: "I have a task" meaning I'm working for somebody, they're paying me.

  • "I have a task", it means I have some work that I must do.

  • Like, cleaning your dishes is a task.

  • Right?

  • It's not a job; it's a task.

  • You don't get paid to do it.

  • All right?

  • Cleaning your toilet is a task you have to do.

  • Well, we've got that out of the way.

  • I have one over here.

  • I couldn't fit it in-sorry-but it's up here: "Pull out all the stops".

  • Notice with an "all-nighter" we had to stay up all night to do the work.

  • "All in a day's work", it means: "Hey, this may not be a good thing or it may be difficult,

  • but it's part of the job; you just got to do it."

  • All right?

  • All is done in the day.

  • When "you pull out all the stops", this means to put your heart and your mind, everything

  • into something - everything.

  • You want to put everything in there to get a result.

  • Okay?

  • So: "I want to meet a pretty girl."

  • You know, she's like walking down the street, she's really cute and I want to meet her,

  • and I go: "Pull out all the stops, man.

  • I'm going to get my car clean.

  • My car.

  • Get my hair cut.

  • Get some new shoes.

  • Get some pants, got a shirt.

  • I'm going to pull out all the stops.

  • Got the tie on.

  • Okay, I'm ready.

  • I'm pulling out all the stops.

  • She's getting the good stuff.