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  • If you have problems with expressing yourself, sometimes maybe you can't find the right expression or you're thinking of that word.

  • But you want a nice way to explain it or to show it.

  • Then maybe this video is going to help you.

  • Hello, everybody.

  • This is Elliot from E.

  • T.

  • J.

  • English, and I'm here today to just give you a few useful expressions.

  • These air quite advanced.

  • Most of them are informal, but they would be used in kind of everyday conversation with natives.

  • So they're really, really useful on really common, especially some Fraser verbs that I'm going to share with you towards the end of this.

  • Anyway, let's begin with the list Number one.

  • I have a really interesting one.

  • I heard this the other day while I was listening to the football.

  • I was watching England, of course, lose to Croatia in the semifinals.

  • I knew we weren't going to go all the way.

  • I knew football wasn't coming home, as everyone was saying, but we gave it a good try.

  • We did our best, However, one of the commentators during the football was talking about a previous manager, and he said he gets a lot of stick now.

  • Firstly, let's just say it in a very natural way.

  • He gets a lot of stick, he gets a lot of stick.

  • So ah, lot of is kind of almost like one section.

  • A lot of we're connecting lot on off.

  • A lot of off is not being pronounced as off as its true form.

  • It's being relaxed.

  • It's what we call a weak form because the word off is not very important in this sentence.

  • A lot of now you might hear in Americans say, a lotta This is our version off it, a lot of so to get a lot of stick.

  • This usually means that maybe people treat you badly.

  • They complain about something you might have done in the past or something you do that's always wrong.

  • So this manager in the past maybe wasn't very successful with the England team.

  • He got into a bit of trouble, so he gets a lot of stick.

  • People still talk badly about him.

  • Now let's say that you have a friend who is planning to do something, but it's something that's a little bit crazy, but maybe your friend is a bit crazy.

  • Let's say your friend is in a really good job, but suddenly he's decided he wants to quit his job and he wants to go and travel the world for the rest of his life, sell his house and just travel the world and do something crazy.

  • I imagine you have a friend who wants to do this.

  • However your friend is is quite known for doing this kind of thing like your friend is maybe a little bit crazy and has done things like this in the past.

  • Well, that means maybe you wouldn't put it past your friend to do this thing.

  • If you were talking about this with someone else about your friend on you were having this conversation and they were saying, Oh, did you know that Dave is going?

  • And he's just decided that he wants to go and travel the world and quit his really good job.

  • You could respond and say, Yeah, well, I wouldn't put it past him.

  • Pronunciation.

  • I wouldn't put it.

  • Put it past him.

  • We're connecting.

  • Put on it because put ends with the continent.

  • It begins with a vowel.

  • So the team moves to the beginning off it put it.

  • I wouldn't put it past him.

  • Weaken.

  • Drop the T at the end of it if we want to.

  • I wouldn't put it past him.

  • Put it past him.

  • Remember, if you want to have that RP accent, that classic British accent you'll want to pronounce past as past not passed.

  • However, in some parts of England, I've explained this in a video before some parts of England will pronounce.

  • It has passed, similar to how Americans dio.

  • It's not a problem.

  • If you wouldn't put something past someone, then it's like saying I wouldn't be surprised if they did this.

  • You know it's not crazy for them, it's something maybe they would do, perhaps, were, um, or negative example.

  • Let's say somebody said to their friend, Did you hear that?

  • Fred cheated on his wife, and now they're having a divorce.

  • You could respond and say, Well, I wouldn't put it past him, meaning I'm not surprised.

  • Now this one is really, really useful for loads of my students, A Z.

  • You know, I have a pronunciation course, and I get messages on WhatsApp all the time from the members of my course, and in the first lesson I asked them to send me, you know, 2 to 5 minute recording off them, just speaking so I can evaluate their pronunciation.

  • Well, when they do this a lot of the time, I have a student who just goes silent halfway through their speaking on.

  • They don't know what to say on there, saying, Oh, I can't think of the word.

  • I know the word, but I can't think of it.

  • I mean, this happens to me as well.

  • Sometimes when it happens to me, I say I'm having a mind blank.

  • I'm having a mind blank now.

  • Firstly, this means to basically just lose your train of thought.

  • Suddenly your mind has gone blank.

  • There's nothing in your mind And you can't think of what it was you were going to say.

  • So if you forget a word, you forget something, anything you could just say you're having a mind blank.

  • But talking about the pronunciation here, I'm having a mind blank mind, mind blank.

  • A blank.

  • Okay.

  • However, mind blank is quite a lot of constant sounds there.

  • So we will actually say mind blank.

  • Imagine you're saying the word mine.

  • It's mine, right?

  • Mine blank.

  • I'm having a mind blank.

  • And finally, I'm going to use a variation off one word in many different types of Fraser verbs.

  • The word is pop.

  • This is extremely British.

  • So if you love British English, you're going to love this one pop.

  • So, firstly, in a literal sense, toe pop, something would usually mean.

  • For example, if we have a balloon on, we put a pin into the balloon, it will go pop in British English.

  • We use it in a different way.

  • What we do use it.

  • In this way, however, we use it in a phrase over way as well.

  • So, for example, I will pop in tomorrow.

  • I could say this to my parents.

  • Okay, I'll pop in tomorrow on.

  • That simply means I will come to your house tomorrow on It's almost like saying it's quick.

  • It's not like saying I'm going to come around.

  • I'm going to stay for dinner for five hours and watch TV with you.

  • To pop in usually means it will be quick and easy.

  • I'll pop in tomorrow.

  • Sometimes people also say I'll pop round or pop over tomorrow on.

  • That's the same thing.

  • So if I'm going to pop out.

  • Let's say I'm in my parents house now.

  • I've popped over.

  • I've popped round on.

  • Now I'll just say to them, I'm just going to pop out for a second.

  • Lots of people say this.

  • If they're smokers and they want to have a cigarette, they might say, I'm just going to pop out for a cigarette once again.

  • That simply is the opposite, and it just means I'm going outside for a second, very quickly pop out again.

  • These are very British.

  • However, it's not just for direction.

  • I could also tell someone to pop something on, for example, something I say to my girlfriend or the time pop the kettle on.

  • Turn something on pop the air conditioning on pop radio on pop the TV on, pop anything on Turn it on.

  • Like I said, the word pop is a very British thing.

  • It is used in other countries, but we use it a lot.

  • Just remember pop finishes with a constant and usually those propositions after will begin with avowal on.

  • That is an easy, easy way to start practicing are connected speech in pronunciation.

  • Pop over, pop out pop in.

  • Anyway, I hope you enjoyed the lesson.

  • Don't forget you conjoined my pronunciation course on Speak to me on what's app at the same time over at www dot e t j english dot com that links in the description below.

  • I can't wait to help you with your British pronunciation.

  • Give me a thumbs up if you enjoyed the video And don't forget to hit Subscribe If you love this channel Thank you very much for watching.

  • I will see you next week.

  • Cheers, guys.

  • Bye.

If you have problems with expressing yourself, sometimes maybe you can't find the right expression or you're thinking of that word.

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A2 pop blank pronunciation british mind put

Everyday Native English Expressions+ British Pronunciation

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/11/06
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