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  • - I didn't realize that I had a barrel chest,

  • and I could approximate anything.

  • I can do those big dumb announcer voices and everything.

  • I'd do it when I was a kid.

  • I thought it was useless,

  • like a parlor trick or something

  • 'cause no one ever looked up to see

  • what the hell was going on.

  • It's like, yeah, we know what you can do.

  • - Good news, everyone.

  • - You stupid idiot.

  • - What's up, Doc?

  • - What a doofus. [laughs]

  • - Hi, "Vanity Fair."

  • This is Billy West, me, and today,

  • I'm going to be reviewing your impressions of my characters.

  • Can't wait.

  • I can't go through with it, Skeet.

  • What if she says no or starts laughing or something?

  • - Hi, my name is Doug Funnie.

  • I just love running around with my friend Skeeter

  • and my dog Porkchop.

  • I really like Patty Mayonnaise.

  • She's probably one of the prettiest girls in all the world.

  • [Billy laughs]

  • - That was really darn good.

  • Bravo.

  • Thank you for your bravery.

  • Doug, as it was described to me originally,

  • he was a 11-1/2 painfully shy tweener.

  • This voice that you're doing sounds like he might be older,

  • which to me is a perfectly fine idea for a character,

  • for a voice for another character

  • that doesn't look like Doug or someone else,

  • but you did a really good job with it.

  • And you know what?

  • You had the somberness in your voice

  • and your delivery and your performance.

  • I would pitch it up higher, if it's possible.

  • You're kind of like here.

  • Well, hey, everybody.

  • This is Doug.

  • You know, but his voice was higher

  • 'cause he was a young guy when I was doing him.

  • He couldn't wait, you know, to go to the Honker Burger.

  • And I got a crush on Patty Mayonnaise, too.

  • And throw more acting into it.

  • Don't be afraid to do anything.

  • Don't be afraid to experiment.

  • Be fearless.

  • Ah, who's gonna notice if we mess up anyway.

  • In five minutes, everybody's gonna be snoring.

  • - Hey, what the?

  • Whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa!

  • Oh, brother.

  • What a doofus. [laughs]

  • You see, Doug?

  • I told you.

  • You can't dance. [laughs]

  • What's going on here?

  • Hey, get me up.

  • You can't just leave me here.

  • Come on!

  • - Nicely done.

  • That was really good.

  • He had the pitch.

  • He had Roger's pitch,

  • which I could do a lot better

  • if it was 30 years ago or so

  • or whenever we did that,

  • but he had the pointedness of Roger.

  • I looked at the picture of Roger

  • and he reminded me of a bully

  • that used to antagonize me in high school.

  • He would always bother me.

  • He had pointy hair, you know,

  • pointy nose,

  • and he was always poking me in the shoulder,

  • and his shoes were pointy.

  • Everything about him was pointed, and eh!

  • This performer had the voice

  • in the right pitch and everything,

  • and I think he was doing a good performance.

  • You know, you can stop every now and then

  • and take your moment.

  • You don't have to Gatling gun through lines

  • unless you're doing a tirade or something.

  • But yeah, he's high energy, Roger.

  • And I think you captured that.

  • Good news, everyone.

  • We were supposed to make a delivery

  • to the planet Tweenis 12,

  • but it's been completely destroyed.

  • - Well, back to the old drawing board, I suppose,

  • and find our own jobs and businesses.

  • For me, I'll just go to the home,

  • where an old bag of dust like me belongs.

  • Good news, everyone.

  • We've run out of food supply for the whole year.

  • Oh well, time to eat Zoidberg.

  • [Billy laughs]

  • - That's really funny.

  • He has the right confidence and he's not afraid to perform.

  • But the thing is is you had the shake,

  • the shaky voice at first of like an old man, but,

  • but he's really old.

  • I mean, old as the hills.

  • You know, I'm looking around for that young idiot Fry.

  • You know, don't be afraid to take your moment with words.

  • I mean, that's how you draw people in.

  • You don't rush through stuff.

  • He, doing the professor,

  • he began to sound like the guy

  • that sits in front of a fire at his estate,

  • and he's got a goblet of Chivas Regal, you know,

  • leaning back on his laurels, and I've done quite a thing.

  • I've done many things, and ask me about one of them,

  • and [mumbles].

  • Look at me.

  • I'm Dr. Zoidberg, homeowner.

  • - I thought that you said that you had good news.

  • Blah, whoop, whoop, whoop, whoop, whoop, whoop.

  • That was my ink defense, ladies.

  • [Billy laughs]

  • - That guy's really good.

  • He's got the spark.

  • He plays with the character voices

  • and he takes his moment.

  • He did little pauses,

  • and it's like, you got to milk that stuff.

  • That's what makes it sound like a real person,

  • rather than some, you know, cloying annoying,

  • made-up cartoon voice.

  • It makes it real.

  • And he had the tonal quality that those characters have.

  • He was hitting the right notes

  • and he was hitting all the right beats.

  • I thought it was great.

  • What I would say to him about Zoidberg,

  • I don't do his voice like with my hand over my mouth,

  • but you're supposed to sound like that.

  • I don't know.

  • What am I doing here?

  • Get me some cake.

  • Zoidberg wants cake.

  • Zoidberg could eat.

  • If you try to imagine all that cool meat

  • hanging off your face how you would sound.

  • Just imagine it.

  • You're all over the place.

  • [mumbles]

  • Oh, you pesky wabbit.

  • I've got you now.

  • - I know what you are thinking, Mr. Bunny Wabbit.

  • You are thinking did old Elmer fire six shots

  • or possibwy onwy five.

  • [laughs]

  • - That's really good.

  • A for effort.

  • Totally A for effort.

  • He's fearless, you know what I mean?

  • He had the tone in his voice,

  • but maintaining it is the hard part.

  • You know what?

  • I think that was the wabbit.

  • He sounded like he was from Boston.

  • I don't know if he was or not,

  • but there's a lot of guys from Boston

  • that were like, aw, Cwist.

  • I don't know.

  • But, but he's got the spirit.

  • He's definitely got the spirit,

  • and good job.

  • You were expecting maybe the Easter bunny.

  • - Well, does he say what's up Doc, like this.

  • Meh.

  • Once, I need a carrot.

  • I'm gonna grab a carrot 'cause I need a carrot for this.

  • [crunching]

  • Yeah.

  • What's up, Doc?

  • I'm just gonna finish the carrot.

  • Nope, never heard of him.

  • You know,

  • maybe there is no intelligent life

  • out there in the universe after all.

  • La da dee da da dum

  • - That was really cool.

  • I liked the method acting.

  • Mel Blanc used to use substitutes for carrots

  • when he did Bugs Bunny because he was allergic to carrots.

  • He'd chew salary stalks and stuff like that,

  • and he had the mouth full.

  • It was real like true Bugs.

  • You know, that spirit, the smugness and the, you know,

  • I know something you don't know.

  • It was in there.

  • He just needs to keep consistent with the Bugs character.

  • You know,

  • it's so easy to drop in and out of character

  • when there's an extended dialogue.

  • You know, if you watch the first episode of "The Simpsons"

  • and you watch the 800th one or whatever it is,

  • the characters sound totally different because we didn't

  • know how to be consistent with characters we created.

  • We weren't sure how far to go or to pull it back.

  • And it's almost like, I didn't know what I was doing.

  • I mean, they find themself eventually,

  • and they become what they're supposed to be.

  • When doing impressions,

  • I think that was a good approximation

  • except to keep hearing yourself doing that character.

  • Try not to be distracted,

  • but I think you've got the right general idea.

  • It's really hard to do that kind of stuff.

  • Doing impressions of somebody like Mel Blanc.

  • I mean, forget it.

  • He was the Mack Daddy, you know.

  • He led the way for all of us.

  • At last,

  • I can have those pec-tor-line plants.

  • - Today's character voice

  • is going to be Ren from "Ren and Stimpy."

  • You stupid idiot.

  • You worm!

  • Turn around, you sick little monkey.

  • Do you have to keep tapping like that,

  • you bloated sack of protoplasm?

  • I know what you want.

  • You coveted my ice cream bar.

  • No, you don't.

  • You can't take it from me now.

  • Oh, this ice cream bar,

  • since I was a child,

  • people always tried to take it from me.

  • Why won't they leave me alone!

  • - Boy, that was good.

  • That was really great.

  • What I noticed was that's an episode

  • from the first season of "Ren and Stimpy,"

  • and this guy has the acting

  • that he was studying from these characters.

  • He has that acting down,

  • the voices or, well, actually he just, he did Ren,

  • and it was really good.

  • I mean the intensity and that, you know,

  • I'm going to kill you kind of thing was in there, you know,

  • like gangsters and then turning

  • into a little whimpering child.

  • But that is the John Kricfalusi version of Ren.

  • It was the original version.

  • - Do you have to keep tapping like that

  • you bloated sack of protoplasm?

  • - He is replicating John Kricfalusi's choices and the voice,