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  • Yeah, welcome viewers around the world to this Election Day edition of CNN.

  • 10.

  • My name is Carl.

  • Jesus feels a little different to be covering an election outside the CNN Center in Atlanta, Georgia, but we're still covering it, just like the two main candidates have covered some serious ground over the past few days, crisscrossing the country on the hunt for votes.

  • Yesterday alone, incumbent Republican President Donald Trump visited Michigan, North Carolina, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin, while Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden traveled to Ohio and Pennsylvania.

  • Both of these candidates voted early.

  • The president in Florida on October 24th, the former vice president in Delaware on October 28th.

  • Of course, their race is hardly the only one.

  • 35 of 100 U.

  • S Senate seats are up for election this year.

  • All 435 voting seats in the House of Representatives are up for election.

  • 11 states air holding, gubernatorial elections, the makeup of state houses and senates are being decided.

  • People are voting on ballot measures, which are laws are issues that citizens decide themselves.

  • All of this is happening today for those who didn't already participate in early voting and when it comes to the presidential race, the number we're looking for is 270.

  • That's how many electoral votes a candidate needs to win the presidency.

  • Each state gets a different number of these based on its population.

  • And while predicting how this puzzle will fit together to make 270 is not an exact science, political analysts and you can tinker with the possibilities on CNN's interactive electoral map.

  • We posted a link to this at CNN 10 dot com by turning state's red for the Republican incumbent or blue for the Democratic challenger, you can see all the path the election could take in determining who gets the minimum number of electoral votes.

  • As we have stated before, though, we may not have the answer tonight like we usually do.

  • Some states will still be counting mail in ballots.

  • In fact, 23 states, except mail in ballots after Election Day as long as they're sent in the mail by November 3rd.

  • So in a close race, if the results from these states aren't known for days, the results of the election may not be either, and there are other complications with the election process that may also delay results.

  • Now, as the results come in on election night, everybody's waiting for news of the call.

  • Our appears President Reagan has one, and he has called Reagan and congratulated him.

  • That's when the losing presidential candidate calls the winner to concede the election.

  • A few minutes ago, I called President way Donald Trump to ensure the smooth transition of power.

  • Now, of course, that's not always how it goes down.

  • The vice president has recalled the governor and retracted his concession.

  • He's not ready to give this up just yet.

  • Election night is just the start of what could actually be a very lengthy process to officially pick the president.

  • Now let's back up for a second.

  • When you vote for president, you're not doing it directly.

  • That's why a candidate can win the popular vote, but not the presidency.

  • What you're actually doing, you're voting for electors.

  • Those are people who are appointed in each state to then choose the president and the vice president.

  • Federal law says all election disputes at the state level need to be wrapped up by December 8th so the electors can cast their ballots on December, the 14th.

  • Now each state governor has got to certify the electoral votes and then send them on to Congress so the results aren't official until the new Congress councils ballots on January the sixth.

  • Now it's usually a straightforward process.

  • But let's say one of the candidates questions the legitimacy of the states count.

  • The governor could choose not to certify the electoral votes or though this is really unlikely, the state Legislature could decide to contest the election and send a different count to Congress, meaning Congress could end up with no results or with competing results from the same state.

  • Now that's a violation of federal law, so Congress would no longer have toe honor that state's electors at all.

  • Now the House and the Senate can then decide which result is valid or throw out the votes from that state altogether.

  • Now I know you think I'm crazy, but this actually happened.

  • It was 18 76 shortly after the Civil War.

  • Samuel Tilden won the popular vote, but there were 19 electoral votes in dispute.

  • Congress had to step in and broker a compromise.

  • Rutherford Hayes was eventually named president in exchange for the end of reconstruction and the withdrawal of federal troops from the South.

  • Here's where things get even more interesting if a candidate still doesn't have a majority of electoral votes.

  • By the end of this process, the 12th Amendment says, the House representatives decides who will be president, and each state delegation gets one vote.

  • The Senate picks a vice president no matter what happens.

  • Somebody has got to take the oath of office on January 20th.

  • So help me God, you both the president and the vice president are still undecided.

  • The speaker of the House temporarily gets that job.

  • Mm.

  • We've reported on how concerns about coronavirus have already impacted this election.

  • It's thought to be a major factor in why more than 95 million votes are already estimated to have been cast before today.

  • The Pew Research Center says other issues on the minds of American voters include the state of the economy, health care and violent crime.

  • The way people feel about a particular candidate the moment they enter the voting booth can also factor in and, according to CNN, 10 contributor Tyler Mauldin soak in the weather.

  • It's Election Day in America, Carl voters are deciding who will be president of the United States for the next four years.

  • As exciting as this may be, studies show whether can keep voters from heading to the polls.

  • It's been long suspected that weather can have a significant impact on Election Day turnout.

  • Researchers in recent years have put data behind those claims.

  • Their results show rain and snow will indeed deter voters from showing up on Election Day, especially undecided voters that have yet to determine which candidate to choose.

  • When inch of snow, they say, can lower turnout by half a percent.

  • And one inch of rain can negatively impact turnout by one hole per cent for those voting today, if that's you a friend or family member.

  • No worries.

  • Today's forecast is about as tranquil as it comes.

  • 99.9% of the country will check the box for a fantastic election day weather For the few of you that may see a little precipitation, it's no more than you would typically see in early November.

  • Those blemishes are in Oregon and Washington, as a front approaches the Pacific Northwest and a small portion of the Great Lakes and New England, with a week.

  • Weather maker Moving over high pressure is leading to great weather for the rest of us, with near to slightly above normal temperatures across much of the U.

  • S.

  • So, yes, Carl history shows whether can affect Election Day in a variety of ways.

  • But for much of the country, today's forecast won't get in the way of those looking toe.

  • Cast a ballot.

  • You 12th Trivia.

  • What type of waves have the longest wavelengths in the electromagnetic spectrum?

  • Radio waves, microwaves, ultraviolent light or X rays With wavelengths measuring between one millimeter and 62 miles, radio waves are the longest.

  • Eso Here's an engineering challenge.

  • You want to move a building 200 ft away.

  • It's five stories tall and weighs £15 million.

  • Think the idea has legs?

  • The building did.

  • Engineers in Shanghai, China, attached almost 200 mobile supports under this building.

  • They acted like robot legs controlled by sensors, and they work together to walk the 85 year old schoolhouse almost a block away.

  • The buildings unusual shape prevented workers from pulling or sliding it.

  • Once the plan was set in cornerstone, it seemed pretty concrete when they took it step by step because they couldn't go brick by brick.

  • It was a feat for robotic feet, a victory for masonry.

  • And they did it without losing a chip off the old block up garlic juice for CNN.

  • 10.

  • Today's shoutout Salutes Freedom.

  • That's Freedom Prep Academy.

  • It's a school in Provo, Utah, where folks there are subscribing and leaving a comment on our YouTube channel.

  • We'll see you all tomorrow, yeah.

Yeah, welcome viewers around the world to this Election Day edition of CNN.

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Election Day In America | November 3, 2020

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/11/03
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