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  • JAIR DARKE: Oh my god.

  • Another one, another one. Wait.

  • Wait.

  • [bleep]

  • JASON DARKE: He's got a dolphin in his mouth.

  • NARRATOR: Sharks and dolphins.

  • This vicious rivalry has been raging for millions of years.

  • Two Australian oystermen get a firsthand look

  • at the aftermath of a battle.

  • Oh my god. Another one, another one.

  • Oy.

  • Oy, massive one.

  • Massive one.

  • [bleep] Look at it.

  • That just come out from underneath the boat.

  • The moment I saw the second shark,

  • adrenaline started pumping through my veins.

  • I didn't know what just happened.

  • That scared the [bleep] out of me.

  • Second shark was bigger than the first.

  • It would have been 12 to 14 foot, probably,

  • but it was definitely bigger.

  • It was huge.

  • JAIR DARKE: Oy, they're fighting.

  • They're fighting.

  • They're fighting.

  • They're fighting.

  • [bleep] He just stole that dolphin.

  • [inaudible] He just stole the dolphin.

  • [interposing voices]

  • JASON DARKE: Look at the size of the thing.

  • NARRATOR: A dolphin is worth fighting over.

  • We do know that if a shark gets

  • the opportunity to eat a dolphin, they absolutely will.

  • In fact, it's a really prized food source.

  • Like many marine mammals, dolphins have all this blubber.

  • So that's a good nutritious meal.

  • NARRATOR: From the injuries, it's

  • clear the dolphin was initially attacked from behind and below.

  • He swam straight past us with the dolphin in his mouth.

  • NARRATOR: How did the shark get past this dolphin's defenses?

  • Dolphins are really quite zippy.

  • They can outmaneuver a shark fairly

  • easily, especially if they're in deeper or open water spaces.

  • NARRATOR: To understand how sharks catch

  • these slippery creatures, the team

  • heads to a beach that offers a unique look

  • at Shark Bay's dolphins.

  • So we're right now at Monkey Mia in Shark Bay.

  • There has been 20 years of really incredible

  • ecological and biological research

  • on the interactions between sharks and dolphins.

  • NARRATOR: Dolphins were first drawn

  • here in the 1960s by fishermen sharing their catch.

  • Today, this site is regulated by the Parks and Wildlife Service.

  • We have some friendly dolphins that come here very regularly.

  • And we get to see them up close and personal,

  • which is really special.

  • NARRATOR: No need for a baited underwater camera.

  • Here, dolphins come to you.

  • And they're covered in scars.

  • So this individual that's just approaching us just now

  • is called Piccolo.

  • And you can see on her dorsal and on her back,

  • she's got scars from encounters with sharks.

  • Dolphins make this trade off.

  • A lot of the food that they want most and the easy fishing

  • grounds, the yummy fish occur around shallow seagrass beds.

  • Unfortunately, that's also where tiger sharks

  • preferentially like to hunt.

  • NARRATOR: To protect themselves, dolphins have a secret weapon--

  • echolocation.

  • They can send out a beam of sound

  • from a fatty part of their head called the melon.

  • The sound beam bounces back and forms

  • a mental image in the dolphin's brain of the world around them.

  • Echolocation is the way that dolphins

  • have to see in dark and low lit environments.

  • Basically, it's like radar or sonar.

  • NARRATOR: But there are limits to this super power.

  • So it works kind of like wide beams on a flashlight.

  • They can only see kind of directly ahead

  • of them or to the sides.

  • So if they get attacked from the back or from underneath,

  • they probably won't see the predator coming.

  • NARRATOR: Dolphins have a blind spot, and sharks know it.

  • JASON DARKE: He's got a dolphin in his mouth.

  • NARRATOR: Great whites use their massive power

  • to charge from beneath in a breach attack.

  • White sharks, you would consider

  • more of an ambush predator.

  • It's probably the shark that you

  • don't see that you worry about.

  • Because a lot of white sharks rely on surprise.

  • They're stealth predators.

  • NARRATOR: It's easy to sneak up on a lone dolphin.

  • But the safety of the pod can stop an ambush,

  • even from a great white.

  • A white shark swims with a group of dolphins.

  • The ocean going mammals show no concern

  • for the killer in their midst.

  • Their ability to communicate and spot their stalker

  • gives the shark no chance at an attack.

JAIR DARKE: Oh my god.

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B2 dolphin narrator shark fighting bleep oy

How Dolphins Evade Shark Attacks | Sharks vs. Dolphins: Blood Battle

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/11/03
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