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  • Hello. Welcome to News Review from BBC Learning English. I'm Neil.

  • Joining me is Catherine. Hi Catherine!

  • Hello Neil and hello everybody! Yes, today

  • we've got a story about protests.

  • If you want to test yourself on

  • any of the vocabulary you learn in today's programme, there's a quiz on our

  • website bbclearningenglish.com.

  • Now, let's hear more about that story

  • from this BBC news report:

  • Yes, we're in the Eastern European country of Belarus for this one.

  • There are protests because people feel

  • that the elections that happened recently were not counted fairly.

  • They're demanding the resignation of the president,

  • Alexander Lukashenko, who's been in power for 26 years.

  • You've been checking out the headlines on this story:

  • what are the three words and expressions that will

  • help people talk about it?

  • Yes, we've got three great words and

  • expressions for you this week.

  • They are: 'eclipses', someone or something's 'moment' and 'embattled'.

  • 'Eclipses', someone or something's 'moment' and 'embattled'.

  • OK. Let's have your first headline, please.

  • Yes. In the UK for this onewe are

  • looking at BBC News. The headline:

  • 'Eclipses' – makes something seem less important.

  • That's right: E-C-L-I-P-S-E-S – 'eclipses'.

  • Now, you know what an eclipse is, don't you Neil?

  • Yeahso an eclipse, for example,

  • is when during the daytime it's lovely and sunny

  • and then suddenly the moon goes in front of the sun

  • and it goes dark.

  • That's exactly right, yes. So, the sun is shining on you:

  • it's bringing you lots of lightit's very important, isn't it?

  • And then suddenly you can't see the sun: it is no longer

  • important. Your attention now is drawn to the moon

  • something normally smaller, but in this case

  • it seems like it's dominating the sun. Is that right?

  • That's right. So, this is about

  • a change of emphasisof importance.

  • Exactly that, yes. When one thing becomes more important,

  • and actually dominates so much that the original thing

  • is no longer attracting any attention: that's the way we use 'eclipse' here.

  • So, President Lukashenko's rally is

  • dominated by the protests... the protests are becoming more important,

  • according to this headline, than Lukashenko's rally.

  • Yes, that's right.

  • Nowused here obviously as a verb as well.

  • Yes, that's right. It can be a verb:

  • you can eclipse something or something can be eclipsed.

  • Now, if we look at the recent coronavirus outbreak,

  • that has eclipsed pretty much every other news story for quite a long time now.

  • The coronavirus is the most important: nothing else

  • is really getting any significance because coronavirus is eclipsing

  • every other item of importance at the moment.

  • Absolutely. And we also hear it quite often in a sporting context,

  • for example, when somebody's record is broken.

  • Yes. So, Lewis Hamilton is a very successful

  • Formula 1 driver, but he's still not got as many Drivers' Championships as

  • Michael Schumacher, but if he does

  • he will eclipse Schumacher's record.

  • Very good example, yes.

  • OK. let's have a summary of that:

  • If you want to learn more about the word 'eclipse' or see a story

  • about eclipses we've got one for you, haven't we Catherine?

  • We have! Words in the Newsand click the link

  • and you can watch the story.

  • OK. Let's hear your next headline.

  • Most certainly. Now we're looking at The Times again, here in the UK.

  • An opinion piece this time and the title is:

  • Something or someone's 'moment' – an opportunity

  • to achieve something significant.

  • That's right. And the key word here is 'moment'.

  • It's a noun – M-O-M-E-N-T – 'moment'.

  • Now – 'moment' – why are we talking about moment?

  • Everybody knows what moment means.

  • It just means a little period of time, so why is it being used here?

  • That's right a moment is a few seconds.

  • When we say 'just a moment' or 'wait a moment'

  • we mean wait a few seconds and then something will happen. So, a moment is a few seconds in time.

  • But here we're talking aboutnot so much time,

  • but opportunity: when the circumstances

  • are right for a change or for a big achievement,

  • we can say: 'This is your moment.'

  • You need to do this thing you've been waiting to do for a long time

  • because the circumstances are right.

  • You can do this, but you have to do it now.

  • That's when we say: 'This is something's moment,

  • or somebody's moment, or your moment.'

  • Yeah. And it's a brief opportunity, isn't it?

  • Yeah. It's something that, if you don't take now,

  • it's gonna vanish.

  • That's right. That's exactly right, yes.

  • It has to happen now... or it won't – it may not happen at all.

  • So, there is general widespread agreement that there is a problem

  • with the environment and that this is the climate's moment:

  • the moment when people can take the opportunity to make a change.

  • It's now or never.

  • Exactly, yeah. A very good example, yes.

  • And we can use it for things like the climate or you can use it

  • for individual people. You can say, if a sportsperson has been

  • training and training and training, for years and years and years,

  • and finally they get to the Olympic Games,

  • and they win, and they're on that podium getting the gold medal, you can say:

  • 'this is her moment' or 'this is his moment'.

  • Absolutely. Let's now have a summary:

  • So, we've been talking about the climate and the fact that it is

  • a moment now for something to be done about the climate.

  • And we have a story about pollution and a possible

  • solution, don't we Catherine?

  • That's right. You know what to do:

  • if you want to watch it, the link's there. Just click it.

  • OK. Our next headline, please.

  • And in the UK againthis time, The Independent.

  • The headline:

  • 'Embattled' – experiencing a lot of difficulties.

  • Yes. E-M-B-A-T-T-L-E-D – 'embattled'.

  • Now, the key part of this word is in the middle and it's 'battle'.

  • Now, you know what a battle is, don't you Neil?

  • Yes. A battle is a fight, often between armies.

  • Yes. A war is often made up of individual battles.

  • Now, when we use the word 'embattled'

  • we're not talking about actual fighting with weapons and guns,

  • but the idea of a lot of fighting – a big struggle – is this idea

  • in this word here now:

  • if somebody is embattled, a lot of people are attacking them.

  • There are lots of issues and they're having

  • they must defend themselves and fight back in lots of different areas,

  • often for a long time. They're struggling and it's not looking good for them, to be honest.

  • If something's – if someone's embattled, they're in a bad situation

  • because of a lot of attacks from different people.

  • Yeah. And we use this to talk about people and

  • things in a position of authority.

  • Yeahthat's right. It's not something we talk about

  • in our kind of everyday life:

  • I wouldn't say, 'Leave Rob alone. He's embattled

  • at the moment. He's got too much to do and people are getting to him.'

  • Yeahnot so much. Not so much for your personal circumstances.

  • We can talk about football managers or football teams being embattled,

  • as you could say for poor Barcelona at the minute,

  • who lost 8-2 to Bayern Munich the otherjust last weekend.

  • That team is embattled: it's got lots of problems. They're going on for a long time.

  • Excellent example, yes. OK. Let's have a summary:

  • Time now for a recap of the vocabulary please, Catherine.

  • Yes. We had: 'eclipses' – makes something seem less important.

  • We had: something or someone's 'moment' – an opportunity to achieve something significant.

  • And we had: 'embattled' – experiencing a lot of difficulties.

  • If you want to continue improving your

  • English with us, we are all over social media:

  • BBC Learning English. Find us!

  • Thank you for joining us and see you next time. Goodbye.

  • Bye!

Hello. Welcome to News Review from BBC Learning English. I'm Neil.

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Belarus: Protests spread - BBC News Review

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/11/03
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