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  • now one of the most important moments from the MBA's bubbles when the Milwaukee Bucks decided to walk out of their playoff game against the Orlando Magic in protest of the Jacob Blake shooting following the Bucks lead, other teams joined in boycotting all across sports.

  • Now Bucks guard Kyle Korver spoke at his alma mater, Create University on Sunday, and he described the emotional scene in the locker rooming and gave some details on how the bucks came to their decision.

  • Korver started by describing Bucks assistant coach Darvin Ham's initial reaction.

  • Take a listen, one of our one of our coaches, um, Darvin Ham.

  • I'm sure he'd be fine with me telling the story, but he's got two sons that are in their twenties who they live in Milwaukee, right?

  • He's thinking about them.

  • He's in tears and he he came in and he said something like kids out on the streets.

  • It's really emotional and went into this little.

  • The locker rooms were kind of weird, but there's like a little coaches thing had been set up like just took the whole thing down.

  • Everyone's jumped up and everyone's already on edge and everyone's already in bad headspace, and I just sat there in my chair with tears running down my face.

  • Mhm.

  • And I'm looking at my jersey that says black lives matter and I'm I'm just like, what are we doing?

  • Mhm.

  • And so we had one teammate, George Hill, uh, decided that he wasn't gonna play.

  • And, uh, Sterling Brown on our team, who has his own case going on in Milwaukee right now.

  • It's It's still open, you know, I'm I'm a George, and they kind of he stood up and he's like, You guys don't have to do this if you don't want to.

  • Me and George, we're going to set out tonight and we all just sat there and we're like, we're all with you, right?

  • We're with you.

  • And there was, like, 13 minutes on the clock, like, you know, this is this is happening in real time.

  • Um, we just kind of sat there and let the clock run out.

  • And we're like, we know we don't know exactly what the future holds.

  • We're not sure exactly what our plane is going for, but we're doing the right thing.

  • This is the right thing.

  • Very powerful.

  • This is the right thing.

  • Matt, you with the Clippers when the Donald Sterling tapes were released, faced a similar situation.

  • You guys were getting ready for a playoff game.

  • You did end up playing that night.

  • Although we remember the demonstration in the middle of the court.

  • You had a mix of races on that team, just like Kyle is describing.

  • Can you describe the emotions you were feeling and what similarities?

  • As you listen to Kyle, they're kind of what does that bring up in a vote for you?

  • It's just a tough situation because you want to do what's right.

  • A t end of the day.

  • You want to do what's right for not only yourself, your family, your team, your community.

  • And I think the fact that their situation was to me on a much bigger scale, obviously, you know, we took care of Donald Sterling.

  • But this is something that's happening continuously in our society.

  • And it happened.

  • I think it was obviously like you said it was countdown.

  • Do we go out and play?

  • Do we not?

  • I think if that was thrown on our plate, we possibly what it did the same thing as them so I applauded these guys for what they did.

  • Um, some people say they gave the power away going right back, but to me, I think you just showed your power.

  • You know, they started.

  • And we know we spoke on this for a whole month.

  • The domino effect across sports in general.

  • Um, the fact they made.

  • So I hope we continue to carry this energy into the polls and realize that that's gonna be the first step of hopefully getting some kind of change.

  • Deck?

  • Yeah, I said this at at the time, you know, obviously incredibly moving from Kyle.

  • But the bucks took.

  • There were some people in Orlando who were mildly irritated that the bucks kind of acted unilaterally and without running a by anybody.

  • And I said this at the time.

  • I'm glad they did that because it was I mean, clearly, you could see how genuine and agonizing it was for them.

  • But, you know, Matt just talked about the widespread domino effect that happened.

  • I don't know that that kind of impact happens if they say, you know, let's go talk about it in a committee with all the other teams that air here and discuss it.

  • And what?

  • The plan of action.

  • Sometimes you just need toe act.

  • Sometimes you just need to go.

  • And they went because it felt right to them and the impact that that decision had and the suddenness of it and the fact that it was unexpected and unrehearsed.

  • I think it was an important part of why we're still talking about it now.

  • And I think it was part of why it was so effective.

  • I I've heard the same things you have mad about.

  • Let go.

  • They just went right back to playing.

  • What did they really accomplish?

  • This wasn't some big, large campaign to accomplish something, because the thing you really want to accomplish is just stopped killing innocent, unarmed black people in this country.

  • And that was not gonna get solved by a basketball game being played or not played.

  • If only it were that easy.

  • What they wanted to do is say we cannot function like this right now, and they showed that and the fact that it was so genuine and spontaneous to me spoke to that.

  • And it didn't have to be about What are you doing two days from now?

  • or what do you demanding?

  • It was like that in the moment cannot do this.

  • We just cannot get up and go play basketball game right now.

  • And the fact that that resonated with so many more athletes around, so many other sports, that was the effectiveness.

  • And it did obviously get so many people's attention.

  • I think one people seem to forget so much is, you know, once you get to this top level, everyone is very talented.

  • It's a mental capacity which allows you to excel or or fall off the map.

  • And there was just so much going on in the world at this time for these guys to be in a bubble taken away from their kids, their family, and then also look to to change the world like you, said Rachel, It's never gonna be a simple Aziz.

  • If we stop playing, they're gonna stop killing us.

  • It's not that, but there.

  • So we say 90% of the game is mental, and if your mental state is not exactly on what you have to do one so your baby, you should be able to focus.

  • No, we're human beings.

  • So if you can't focus Obviously we can't focus either, so I think they did a great thing spur of the moment.

  • You try to spread it around and asked to me and to get into many opinions.

  • I'm glad they did what they did.

  • They flex their parent.

  • Like I said, I hope we understand that it doesn't just stop November 3rd.

  • This is a movement they need to carry on from here on out, absolutely in the league is talking to the Players association about how they want to move forward with that.

  • There's the largest billion dollar corporation in America that made the most public statement on this in the last six months, and they have to decide where to go forward from here.

now one of the most important moments from the MBA's bubbles when the Milwaukee Bucks decided to walk out of their playoff game against the Orlando Magic in protest of the Jacob Blake shooting following the Bucks lead, other teams joined in boycotting all across sports.

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Discussing Kyle Korver's emotional comments on the Bucks' protest | The Jump

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/11/01
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