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  • the whole area has been charred.

  • There's no way a quality living here anymore.

  • They're in really big trouble.

  • Oh, that's adorable.

  • My name's Jack Randall on I'm a zoologist.

  • Let's close angle.

  • Australia's wild places and animals are close to my heart.

  • Earlier this year, the most devastating wildfires on record swept through the country, consuming over 18 million hectares of land and killing over a billion animals.

  • I've been following this story since then and have come to South Australia to see how people on nature of fighting back on to find out more about the fate of one of the world's most beloved animals, the koala things Forest used to be a perfect habitat for koalas because it's all eucalyptus trees.

  • Koalas were in huge populations, but now they're in really big trouble.

  • Good thing is that there's been lots of Australians that really care for their wildlife, and they've come to places like this, find any qualities that needed to be saved.

  • My first stop is the Adelaide Kuala Rescue.

  • Try our center, where a team of volunteers dedicate their time to rescuing wild qualities in need.

  • Ah, that is the most adorable animal I've ever seen in my life.

  • He's cute even when he's not trying to bay.

  • How many koalas would you say you've rescued over the bushfire period?

  • Over 300.

  • 300.

  • Will they be released back into the wild?

  • We've released 80 koalas.

  • We do, however, have some koalas that have no home to go home.

  • Team will be quite a few years before.

  • Those habitats are good enough koalas to go back into you.

  • Okay, Now, a lot of these rescued quarters needs serious medical care on the Adelaide Kuala and Wildlife Hospital.

  • Provide just that.

  • Even now, wild quarters are being brought in injured, dehydrated or without homes.

  • Spinney.

  • So this is actually was picked up yesterday.

  • She was found in the inside of a burnt out tree.

  • So what would yours?

  • We're doing well.

  • Check over.

  • Start to finish, Actually.

  • Aren't any burns to her?

  • Port was, which was really good.

  • So hopefully she wasn't around when the significant fire went through.

  • Although at first glance, Ashley seems perfectly healthy.

  • Nurse Natasha worries that smoke inhalation might have damaged her lungs, so she does have really quite muffled chest sound so normal you can hear the air moving around in the her chest.

  • She's just covered in charcoal.

  • Imagine all of that being inhaled into the lungs cannot be good for any quality.

  • So what do you think?

  • The chances of her managing to survive and get back out into the wild?

  • Well, if we could get everything under control for about 80% chance that she'll go well, you just have to make sure that we can keep it pain free and supportive care throughout her healing process.

  • 80%.

  • Well, I'm definitely happy with that.

  • That's amazing.

  • Ashley is one of the lucky ones to have been found and taken to the hospital.

  • But what about those that are still out there?

  • It's one of the hottest days of the year, and qualities don't do well in the heat.

  • So what's the best thing to do if you see a dehydrated Kuala?

  • I've seen that people have bean feeding quality water by her that you're supposed thio.

  • Give water in a bowl, rose bowl or in your scoot hands.

  • Yeah, otherwise they can actually inhale it into their lungs, and then it can cause secondary infections like pneumonia and things, and it is quite life threatening in that case.

  • Wow.

  • I must be careful.

  • I set off to Norton Summit whether, as a chance, I'll be able to check on any qualities that might be struggling with the heat.

  • This area has been untouched by the fires.

  • So it's one of the last refuges for the Kuala is living in this state.

  • Usually they'll be high up in the trees, but if they're lower down, it means them overheating.

  • I've actually got some water with me.

  • I'm gonna offer that water to a koala.

  • That might be really, really thirsty.

  • Okay, so that is a koala poop.

  • They only eat.

  • Believes in these eucalyptus trees.

  • They actually just absorb as much moisture from a food as possible.

  • There's very little moisture left in there.

  • It smells a bit like eucalyptus.

  • I've actually heard that the koalas, they like sitting by the side of a road.

  • Believe it or not, I think it's a bit cooler down there.

  • So I'm gonna go up on top of this valley.

  • There's a road up there, so I'm gonna move along.

  • They're looking for any koalas.

  • I might be there now.

  • Go on.

  • It's Qala in the tree.

  • Really?

  • Really.

  • close down to the ground must be extremely extremely hot.

  • Old aboriginal language Kuala actually means drink.

  • Guare's don't normally need to drink any water at all.

  • They get all their water from believes.

  • But the problem is it's so hot, so dry that the moisture content and believes is so low.

  • So they're not getting as much water.

  • They would usually, if he's really dehydrated, he may take some water from me.

  • He's been confused, is like what is not human doing up in the tree, and it may a God bowl so he can just look up the water because if he thinks too much water, one guy, they can actually drown in water.

  • So you have to be really careful.

  • Last year, very fast.

  • E Wow, we've got a very dehydrated quality here to take that water for my hands.

  • That might be enough just to get him through this really, really hard dry season.

  • It's nice to meet you.

  • Make it good luck.

  • This was a wildlife encounter that will stay with me for the rest of my life.

  • No seeing this Kuala Later on in the evening, high up in his tree, it filled me with hope.

  • But until these forest habitats have restored the future off, the whole of Australia's Kuala population hangs in the balance.

  • Wow, look at that.

  • Many of these trees you look at and think that's it.

  • They're gone forever.

  • That's not the case.

  • This is new life that's coming to this tree.

  • I reckon in a few years time I will come back here on C, This place thriving again with lots of wildlife.

  • Nature's resilience to bounce back is just remarkable, but only when combined with a solid reforestation program.

  • Thank you on the incredible efforts of so many Australian wildlife warriors.

  • Will it be enough to give Australia's most adored species hope for the future?

the whole area has been charred.

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The Future of Koalas | National Geographic

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/10/31
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