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  • - Fixin' to. So I'm about to.

  • - Yeah, yeah

  • - Fixin'

  • [energetic guitar music]

  • - So where are y'all going?

  • - Oh, well I'm fixing to have my lunch.

  • [jazz music]

  • - A winder is a window.

  • See, it's not Southern, it's go stand by the winder.

  • Purdy is pretty.

  • You look purdy.

  • I have to say, you look downright purdy.

  • A pie supper, It's an organized kind of supper

  • where you would be,

  • auctioning or selling off pies.

  • Gonna hand me a pie supper for the PTA.

  • I've been to pie suppers at my church.

  • Biscuits are really big in West Virginia

  • and a cats head is a big biscuit.

  • What, West Virginia is known for is Tudor's Biscuit World.

  • And there you can get yourself a cats head biscuit

  • and a sausage gravy.

  • [jazz music continues]

  • - Hip, hip is a term that typically means,

  • I understand something.

  • If, if someone's trying to pull one over on me, they can't,

  • 'cause I've already got the information.

  • So somebody would say, would say,

  • "My man thought he was cheating on me

  • "and I didn't know [beep],

  • "but I was hip, I was hip to it".

  • - Huh, yeah, yeah

  • - So you know what I mean, you know what I'm talking about?

  • you know what I'm talking about?

  • 'Cause he would, he said, "He gonna go to college.

  • "He gonna go on the other side with that degree.

  • "And he going to be in good shape.

  • "So no I'm hip, I'm hip."

  • Meaning I understand, what you're saying.

  • I comprehend what you're saying.

  • Yeah, hip.

  • Chicken, amongst other, food related words, means money.

  • So back in the old days it was like dough,

  • but now it's like,

  • "Yo man, he got a lot of chicken,"

  • or, "He got a lot of cheddar."

  • You can say chicken, you can say cheddar,

  • you can say bands like the, like the little money,

  • the money bands that they put around the money,

  • they count that as money.

  • Got that paper, she got that paper.

  • She got that paper, you know, or let me go get that paper.

  • [jazz music continues]

  • [Mathew laughs]

  • - Dad gum, It's a nice way to say,

  • instead of saying, you teach your kids.

  • Instead of saying dammit.

  • - Oh, dad gum,

  • - Oh, dad gum.

  • - Dad darn it.

  • - Yeah, it's very funny when you see it written.

  • - Dad, gum [laughs]

  • - Dad gum.

  • - Bless your heart.

  • - That's everywhere, that's universal.

  • - Yeah, bless your heart.

  • - That's the English language

  • - Women, in Texas and in the South

  • Oh bless your heart, oh bless your heart.

  • If you're going through a bit of a tough,

  • tough, tough moment.

  • [jazz music continues]

  • - Aksarben, Aksarben is Nebraska backwards.

  • Our main like civic center,

  • I guess, where Boys II Men would play,

  • which I saw them in fifth grade

  • when Brandy opened up for them,

  • no big deal, that it was called the Aksarben Centers.

  • So, we're pretty clever in Nebraska.

  • Red beer, baby!

  • Red beer is, just like a beer.

  • And then you put tomato juice in it.

  • Like Mexicans have micheladas and, those are delicious.

  • We, sort of do that without any of the delicious spices.

  • [Adam laughs]

  • We have like the Whitest version of a michelada

  • and it's just called red beer, also pretty delicious though.

  • Oracle of Omaha, my boy,

  • the king himself, Warren Buffet.

  • We call him the Oracle of Omaha because he's from Omaha

  • and he's like, I think he's like the second richest man

  • in the world or something like that

  • and, he's just really good at doing the stock markets.

  • And Omaha weirdly has like,

  • like the most millionaires per capita at least was a fact

  • that I heard when I was a child because of Warren Buffet,

  • because everybody was just like, "This guy seems smart"

  • and invested with him

  • and then he made everyone super rich, except for my parents

  • [jazz music continues]

  • - Giggin' mean dancing, grooving

  • Uh yeah, I got my own gig.

  • You wanna see me gig.

  • [E-40 laughs]

  • No, no, no

  • I got dumb gigs.

  • Cattin' off, that's a Bay area word fo' sho fo' sho

  • that's just lingering through the streets for many moons,

  • you know, cattin' off me, just,

  • you know me just doing some more silly shit, you know,

  • just cattin' off, fucking around. You know what I mean?

  • Cattin' off, hello.

  • Hella, You now that's Bay area,

  • Whenever you hear somebody say,

  • "Man, there was hella of them out there,"

  • You know what I'm saying,

  • How many dudes was outside waiting for y'all?

  • Hella of 'em.

  • [E-40 laughs]

  • I want hella of 'em, man.

  • You know hella, that mean just a whole bunch.

  • That's it, they're right there.

  • Put that in a dictionary, a whole bunch.

  • [jazz music continues]

  • The Bootheel, Missouri is, is a, is an odd little shape

  • and in the South East corner is a little chunk,

  • that kind of bites into Arkansas called the Bootheel.

  • My family is from kind of down South toward that way,

  • but not quite as far as the Heel.

  • Oh, t-ravs, the shortened version of toasted ravioli's.

  • Have you ever had toasted ravioli?

  • - No, is this something you eat?

  • - What you basically do is take a ravioli

  • and you bread it and deep fry it

  • and then you dip it in tomato sauce and cover it with

  • Parmesan cheese.

  • - [indistinct] Deep fried.

  • - Oh it's so good.

  • - T-ravs.

  • Farty-far

  • - Farty-far, St Louisans have what can only be described

  • as a particular accent,

  • especially when trying to pronounce, the O vowel sometimes.

  • - Mm hmm

  • - So forty-four

  • - Oh

  • - Highway 44,

  • Highway Farty-Far

  • [Michael laughs]

  • - That's so good.

  • - Large, arge,

  • that's a gorgeous orange family you got wearing there.

  • [jazz music continues]

  • - Oh might could, I could probably do it.

  • There's a possibility in which I could attempt it.

  • Yeah, I might could, I might could,

  • like it depends like I might could, maybe not, maybe could,

  • I might attempt it, but probably not.

  • [finger snaps]

  • Oh, plump as a dumplin'.

  • God, you know,

  • you know, just little cushion.

  • Yeah, I don't know. Plump as a dumplin' is just,

  • yeah, it's a lot of gravy.

  • [Chloe laughs]

  • I gotta go.

  • [Chloe laughs]

  • That one made me red.

  • [Chloe laughs]

  • A hussy, my grandma used the term "floozy".

  • "Your grandma is no floozy, your memaw is no floozy."

  • So much so that my brother actually ,

  • got that tattooed on the back of his arm.

  • 'Cause that was like her main thing

  • and she never wanted to be called a floozy.

  • [Chloe laughs]

  • I think it's so cute.

  • But, again it goes back to the theme, like in the South,

  • there's a lot of respect, a lot of respect.

  • So, how's Sierra floozy.

  • You don't want to be one of those girls.

  • [jazz music continues]

  • - Woo wop da bam.

  • - Woo wop da bam is like,

  • then, we was at the store

  • and then womp and I was like, bam, bam.

  • - That's... - Like a fight,

  • like, like a Batman.

  • - That's close it really is almost like a "yada yada",

  • I'm just trying to get to the story.

  • - Oh. - You can be like,

  • "So Dan, I told Pat, you know,

  • "get out of my house.

  • "You son of a [beep] and he said no [beep] you,

  • "you're the [beep] and you know woo wop da bam,

  • "the cops came and took him away."

  • - T'd.

  • - Past tense of t.

  • - That's pretty good.

  • In Chicago it means the party just went to a new level.

  • "Oh this [beep] just got t'd off, man."

  • - I'm bout to go on you.

  • - To me that sounds like something,

  • you would say to Trump because he likes golden shower.

  • - Ooh, in Chicago it really means I'm gonna roast you.

  • Like, "Oh pad look who got [beep] French's mustard

  • "on his Konerko jersey.

  • "Oh big I'm about to go on you, pad."

  • - You bout to piss on him

  • - Yeah.

  • - Yes. - See it's the same.

  • [jazz music]

  • - Nary is the word not any ever,

  • - Ever.

  • - Is the definition.

  • - There was nary a time,

  • when I didn't want to be working with you.

  • - This is well done.

  • - I'm not going to go after that I'm sorry.

  • - You can't go after that.

  • - Smidgin'

  • - That's a very small amount.

  • - There's just a smidgin' of sugar in those muffins.

  • - Or smidgin' of interest in this bit we're doing.

  • [Laura laughs]

  • - Haired up like a summer pig turd.

  • - Means, needs to shave

  • - It means you need to shave.

  • Usually slang will shorten,

  • [Laura laughing]

  • what you trying to say.

  • - In this case.

  • - It doesn't.

  • - This is what you say when you need to shave

  • [jazz music continues]

  • - Kentucky waterfall, is that like a long whiskey pour?

  • - No, it means mullet.

  • - That's so brilliant.

  • [Jennifer laughs]

  • That's so brilliant.

  • Hot Brown.

  • [Joel laughs]

  • [both laughing]

  • - No, it's not what you're thinking.

  • - It's a, is that like some.

  • - You eat it.

  • - Just baked bread or something?

  • - Close Yeah, it's like an open face, unhealthy sandwich.

  • - You know what that is? - Toboggan.

  • - Yeah, yeah that's when like a vehicle,

  • for a non-motorized snow vehicle.

  • - No, I mean, first of all,

  • that's no way to talk about penguins.

  • This is a snow hat.

  • - Toboggan?

  • - Yeah you put it on your head.

  • - Well, there's a lot of miseducation in Australia.

  • A toboggan is like something you get on and you go on the

  • snow with, which is like a sled.