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  • Yeah, 2020 has been a year of first, not all of them good.

  • But in keeping with that tradition, we're starting today's show with the first for the United Nations General Assembly.

  • I'm Carl Jesus.

  • This is CNN 10.

  • This year marks the 75th anniversary of when the United Nations was established, and this week marks the beginning of the U.

  • N.

  • General Assembly, an annual meeting at the U.

  • N headquarters in New York City.

  • Representatives, often the leaders of the UN's 193 member countries are there to publicly address global cooperation.

  • Global concerns, global problems.

  • This is what the event usually looks like with his many as 2500 people assemble in one room that's under normal circumstances.

  • But for the first time in the organisation's history, it's meeting is happening online this week out of concerns over the spread of coronavirus.

  • Roughly 210 people, less than 1/10 of what you normally see, are expected in the assembly hall.

  • Their role to introduce the videotape speeches of their leaders, those recordings and virtual meetings will replace the large gatherings and sideline get togethers.

  • There will be no in person lobbying.

  • No power lunches.

  • Diplomacy has gone online.

  • And while Tuesday speakers alone included the leaders of the United States, China, Russia, France, Iran and all of them, within hours, there's no way to gauge audience reactions or to know who's watching live.

  • And the secretary general of the United Nations, the leader of the organization, says for diplomacy to be effective, person to person contact is needed.

  • So it's hard to say how much will get accomplished through this year's U.

  • N General Assembly.

  • But the event still has a list of topics it plans to address.

  • Armed conflict, hunger, poverty and racism are among them.

  • So is the elephant in the room.

  • The coronavirus pandemic.

  • Scientists around the world continue their race to find antibody treatments and drugs to fight the disease.

  • The quest to develop a widely approved vaccine continues, But even that's on Lee a step in the pandemic.

  • Getting it to people will be the next challenge.

  • Pharmaceutical companies are inching closer to the finish line.

  • There are over 170 vaccine candidates around the world.

  • Eight are in the final stage of human trials, proving them to be effective, safe on achieve regulatory approval isn't the only challenge.

  • We have to go from there to actually having billions of doses of vaccine that can be delivered to people around the world.

  • We're investing in the process of manufacturing before we even know whether a given vaccine will reach licensure and could be used.

  • Governments around the world have committed billions of dollars to vaccine makers, buying up hundreds of millions of vaccine doses, which may not even work.

  • Pfizer, in partnership with Bio in Tech, plans to make 100 million doses off its vaccine candidate by the end of the year and over a billion next Well, it is absolutely not normal.

  • It's unprecedented to try and meet that demand.

  • Visor has set up separate manufacturing in the US and Europe.

  • Ondas, drawing on all its resource, is making the vaccine isn't the end of the challenge next up, getting it to those that need it All over the world, Companies like GPS plan to be ready to pick up, store on deliver successful vaccine, different types of vaccine, need different transport and storage conditions.

  • One of the biggest challenges is temperature.

  • Keeping the vaccine safe and secure is critical and UPS plans toe have 24 7 tracking for every single vial.

  • 12th trivia.

  • What occurs when the sun crosses Earth's equator?

  • Solar eclipse, equinox, daylight saving time or solstice?

  • When this happens, day and night are the same length and an equinoxes occurring.

  • It's fall.

  • Y'all, at least it is in the Northern Hemisphere.

  • Yesterday marked the second equinox of the year, which signals the advent of autumn if you live north of the equator and the start of spring if you live south of it.

  • The term equinox comes from the Latin word equinox, IAM and yes, I wrote that in because I wanted to say Equinox iam.

  • It means equality between day and night.

  • And that's what people saw yesterday, no matter where they live.

  • It doesn't make much difference if you live on or very near the equator.

  • Your days and nights are roughly the same length year round, but the farther you live from the equator, the more you're going to notice the changes in daylight for the months ahead.

  • Folks in northern Canada, Norway and Russia are going to see a long, dark winter with minimal sunshine.

  • They're daylight hours in the summer of the opposite.

  • If the descent into darker months gets them down, though they have, this is their consolation prize.

  • The aurora borealis, or northern lights, are usually more active during the equinoxes, according to a solar physicist interviewed by CNN.

  • Most of the world's population an estimated 90% lives in the Northern Hemisphere, and many of them are looking forward to the change of scenery that comes with the change of seasons.

  • The term leave peeping.

  • You often hear it from, say, September through November, and it's that informal term given to people who travel vast distances to get a glimpse of the fall.

  • Colors certainly could feel the cool temperatures outside.

  • You can see the splash of color is beginning to take place.

  • But why does this all happen?

  • I want you to think about leaves on a tree has essentially many solar panels.

  • What they're able to do is fascinating.

  • They're taking the sunlight in and through a process known as photosynthesis.

  • They're able to transfer the sun's energy and create a chemical known as chlorophyll.

  • Now chlorophyll is key because it gives the leaves.

  • It's green colors during the long summer months, but beneath the surface.

  • The leaves actually always have the reds, oranges, yellows in place.

  • While chlorophyll is there, it's there, and it's green.

  • While it's taken away in the shorter days and shorter months of the autumn, now you're releasing some of the true colors back to the surface.

  • Off course weather could play a role in this as well, especially in the vibrancy of it.

  • When you have plenty of rainfall in the growing season or in the spring season, be able to get plenty of good colors in early September, October and November.

  • If you have extreme heat, extreme drought in place, maybe a free early snowstorm or even strong winds.

  • Certainly that can do damage.

  • Believes will not be there for you to see them in peak foliage.

  • So hopefully have a chance to get out there this year and enjoy the fall colors.

  • We're going to spend the last part of today's show talking about tug of war.

  • Now you might be like, Dude, how long can you talk about that?

  • Well, I'll start with history.

  • According to time dot com tug of war used to be an Olympic sport.

  • From 1900 to 1920 teams of eight men tried to drag their opponents over a certain distance.

  • If neither team could get the upper hand or foot whoever made the most progress one and one of the most successful countries that this was Britain, whose city of London police officers proved opponents couldn't escape the long arm or the strong arm of the law.

  • Now some people might think of Tug of War is a game for summer camp or county fairs.

  • But a group of folks in Brooklyn, Wisconsin, hopes to drag the sport into the 21st century.

  • Okay, Tiger tug of war is the ultimate team sport.

  • If one man goes down, he could take the whole team down with because you have to have eight pullers working in unison as one he's keep that that we owe to the general public.

  • They think tug of war may be just a game in high school.

  • Keep a low in serious competition, their strict rules and guidelines and Onley top athletes in the country's get to that level center one.

  • Keep it down.

  • If you're going into a rope pull, you might be the strongest person in the world.

  • But if your head isn't in it.

  • You're gonna lose.

  • I've got a bad Got a fantastic positions.

  • You go.

  • There you go.

  • Go.

  • Ah, guys, your legs are the strongest muscles in your body and they can push £400 easy.

  • And you've gotta transfer that through your hands.

  • They're not allowed to wear gloves.

  • They could only put the tack on calluses build up.

  • I call them square fingers because you get the edges pushed again.

  • Well, the reason that tug of war was ousted from the Olympics is that they were cutting sports.

  • So they dropped it.

  • And that's been the fight to get it back in e hope to see it back in the Olympics because I believe it deserves to be there.

  • I'm representing the U.

  • S.

  • And I take a lot of pride in trying to do the best job I possibly can.

  • So anyone could get roped in, pulled in, dragged in, towed in, hauled in, strung along and find the whole idea moving.

  • Does it tug at your heartstrings?

  • It certainly seems to have a draw, even if it doesn't end in one.

  • I'm Carla Zeus, Santa Rita High School.

  • We see you shout out to our viewers in Tucson, Arizona.

  • We'll see you tomorrow on CNN.

Yeah, 2020 has been a year of first, not all of them good.

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B1 INT vaccine tug equator assembly war northern

Leaders Go Online and Fall Arrives | September 23, 2020

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    林宜悉   posted on 2020/10/28
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