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  • - People tend to think that money

  • and finance is this unemotional thing.

  • That's actually not the case.

  • It's deeply rooted

  • in the traumas that have created

  • the society that we continue

  • to see inequalities prosper when we're trying

  • to dismantle those systems.

  • (slow bright music)

  • I'm Chloe McKenzie,

  • I'm the Founder and CEO

  • of BlackFem.

  • BlackFem is making communities better

  • because we are implementing financial education five days

  • a week as a core subject starting in elementary school.

  • So that black girls and girls of color have the skills,

  • habits and resources to build and sustain wealth.

  • We've seen students perform better.

  • It's a standard deviation

  • in their math and English language arts test scores

  • because they are receiving our curriculum five days a week.

  • Even though we care most about closing

  • the wealth gap for black women and girls,

  • black feminist teaching tells us

  • that if you liberate those who are

  • at the bottom,

  • you're actually liberating everybody.

  • So we could do so in a way that takes

  • this radical idea of closing the wealth gap

  • for black girls and ensuring that all students who work

  • with our curriculum are receiving financial literacy

  • five days a week as a core subject

  • during the school day.

  • We typically see financial literacy happening after school

  • so you're only gonna reach a certain population.

  • I wanted every single kid to get it every single day

  • for at least 45 minutes.

  • And that's what we're doing

  • in school districts across the country.

  • - Because a lot of people heard it

  • and it was like,

  • what are we gonna teach kids that's in the second grade?

  • Like that's too much for them.

  • Like some teachers had that mindset

  • and some was willing to embrace it.

  • I just felt

  • like I was willing to embrace it.

  • Even if I've got,

  • you know

  • one or two kids to understand or

  • just strike their interest,

  • it was a success to me. (upbeat music)

  • - School was everything to me.

  • I'm not really sure why,

  • but I've always just loved learning.

  • I actually skipped two grades.

  • So you know,

  • the kind of idea of being a nerd was something

  • that I really took to heart

  • and really embraced and enjoyed.

  • For me what I found

  • to be so important to my trajectory

  • and the work that I do

  • in the world was the fact that I had

  • an enabling environment.

  • I had teachers who understood my passion for history

  • and my passion for understanding and studying injustices.

  • - Today we're here to talk about one

  • of my former students,

  • Chloe McKenzie.

  • Chloe and I came to know each other

  • when she first entered in my previous high school.

  • And she commanded my attention

  • the moment I'd say I met her.

  • She has always been passionate about

  • what she believes in.

  • - I think I've always had this motto of service is

  • how you heal.

  • Mr. McCluskey is actually one

  • of the people who helped me understand

  • that. BlackFem will be coming to this school.

  • And of course, because Mr. McCluskey was

  • the reason why I got into social justice.

  • It's a big theme here in this school community.

  • - We are in Bethesda, Maryland,

  • right outside Washington, DC.

  • We're here now because in my new role as a principal,

  • I want to do some partnership

  • with Chloe in her new role with BlackFem.

  • - The way that wealth was created in America was

  • through stolen indigenous land

  • and through black bodies.

  • And so the fact that my body was a source of wealth

  • but that I didn't have any value inherently

  • as a person is something that lives within us.

  • Our education system is inadequately supporting certain

  • groups of students as it is,

  • black girls being one of them.

  • And our schools also don't have

  • this intention to set our students up

  • for financial success.

  • - I see the work that Chloe is doing.

  • She knows that this work and BlackFem is going

  • to make a difference in the lives of young people.

  • - I think what's so great

  • about the generation that's in high school right now is

  • there's this very strong intention

  • and rigor to be able to create a better world

  • for themselves.

  • And so we're really going to be identifying

  • how financial activism can be something

  • that the students here engage in

  • and prepare to not only build wealth

  • but then use their financial activism at

  • the same time to change our communities.

  • The narratives that we're providing to students,

  • get them to think that they need to be

  • on this journey or this pursuit

  • for more above all else rather

  • than thinking about what is it that I really want

  • and how do I fund that vision?

  • And that's really what wealth is.

  • (bright music)

- People tend to think that money

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B1 wealth chloe financial black wealth gap bright music

How One Organization Is Fighting For Wealth Justice // Presented by Hyundai

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    林宜悉 posted on 2020/10/28
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